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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | October 16, 1991
Biotechnology continues to be the rage in stock mutual funds. It has provided added muscle to an investment year in which a great many portfolio managers have beaten the market averages.The average stock mutual fund rose nearly 25 percent in the first three quarters of this year. That compares with a 17 percent gain for the Dow Jones industrial average, 20 percent for the Standard & Poor's 500."Health, financial services and small companies have been hot this year, with over-the-counter stocks leading the way," said A. Michael Lipper, president of Lipper Analytical Services, which tracks the nation's stock mutual funds.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
After a brutal third quarter in which the United States saw an unprecedented downgrade of its credit, many weary investors are staying on the sidelines. Despite encouraging signs about new unemployment claims in recent days, uncertainty remains as the continuing European debt crisis threatens to erode an already fragile economic recovery in the United States. Meanwhile, investors fear that failure by the congressional "supercommittee" to reach a deficit-reduction plan by this week's deadline could further hurt consumer confidence, especially as the crucial holiday shopping season begins.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 4, 1998
So, how should you proceed in this market?Don't panic. And don't follow the crowd; the crowd is often wrong.Look for buying opportunities, especially depressed high-tech issues.If you seek income in this bear market, ask your broker about Duff & Phelps Utilities Income Fund. It trades on the New York bTC Stock Exchange, pays a high dividend and mails you a monthly check.Stick to quality in a bear market. If Merck & Co. Inc. stock drops 20 points, you still own a top-grade pharmaceutical issue.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
You may not see a lot of black armbands or be wearing one yourself. But many of us are in deep mourning — for big stock losses going back to 2008. And our sorrow is so similar to what we feel after a divorce or death in the family that we're likely working through the five stages of grief, says Andrew W. Lo, a finance professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has studied investor behavior. The stages for investors are the same as for the grieving: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1998
T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. was the leading manager of diversified U.S. stock mutual funds over the past three years, according to an industry report yesterday.The survey by Chicago-based Morningstar included the 20 biggest firms in terms of assets under management in four investment categories. It gauged how the funds did in the three-year period ended Jan. 31.The fund companies were then ranked in accordance with how their funds performed. The rankings also took into account the risk level of the portfolios.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | April 15, 1992
The dramatic flow of money into stock mutual funds in early 1992 unfortunately hasn't been rewarded with breathtaking performance.Equity funds, coming off a 31 percent average return last year, slipped a fraction of a percent in the first quarter. A flat stock market was blamed. Adding insult to injury, last year's superstars, the health and biotechnology stocks, declined 9 percent in the quarter. Financial services stocks replaced them as the top performers."The contrarians who said a money-market fund would be the best-performing fund in 1992 may have been right after all," observed A. Michael Lipper, president of Lipper Analytical Services, which tracks the nation's funds.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1993, Washington Post Writers Group | May 16, 1993
New York --How do the First Couple manage their personal money? Like all too many affluent people of their age, they run it disjointedly and without a plan.Given their youth and the size of their assets, the Clintons should be aggressively committed to growth. That means a heavy dose of diversified stocks or stock mutual funds, held for years.Instead, they overload on "safe" bank accounts and bonds, without realizing how risky it is to invest for no growth -- the risk being that your savings lose value after taxes and inflation.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 13, 1996
Holiday hints about your money:If you buy stocks with bonus money -- or give shares as holiday gifts -- don't overlook local issues. Some recent developments: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. appears under "Appealing High-Yielding Stocks" in the Nov. 27 S&P Outlook. The stock yields 6 percent, double the current inflation rate.The Dec. 4 Outlook lists Black & Decker under "Economically Sensitive Stocks We Favor." A B&D spokesperson says the company's SnakeLight flexible flashlights are selling "extremely well as holiday gifts."
BUSINESS
April 3, 1993
Gerstner's RJR stock plummetsThe $5 million signing bonus that Louis V. Gerstner Jr. received from his new employer, International Business Machines Corp., will come in handy.Yesterday, the value of Mr. Gerstner's stock in RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp., his former employer, plummeted $7.04 million. Mr. Gerstner, 51, who took over the helm of the weakened computer company Thursday, has not sold his 5.63 million shares of RJR stock, the company said.Saturn union chief survives voteThe United Auto Workers local president who supports the union's unconventional labor partnership with the Saturn Corp.
BUSINESS
By Bill Barnhart and Bill Barnhart,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 18, 1998
News that stock mutual funds suffered a net withdrawal of cash in August to the tune of $11.2 billion -- the first monthly net redemption in eight years -- eroded the belief that systematic mutual fund buying represents a safety net under stock prices.The long-running bull market engendered the expectation that American workers, individually empowered with tax-advantaged, employer-sponsored retirement savings plans such as 401(k) programs, would buy stocks through mutual funds in good markets and bad, with the convenience of payroll deductions.
BUSINESS
By Josh Friedman and Josh Friedman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2003
Wall Street's rebound is luring small investors back into stock mutual funds. Investors poured a net $16.1 billion into the funds in April, the biggest monthly inflow in more than a year, according to the industry's chief trade group. The buying continued into last month, according to unofficial estimates from fund trackers. If they're right, April and May would mark the first time in a year that the funds have seen back-to-back cash inflows. April saw the largest net inflow to stock funds since March 2002, when $29.6 billion piled in, according to the Investment Company Institute.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
A year ago, many investors shunned sober-sounding tax-managed mutual funds in favor of ones that focused on high-flying Internet stocks. But recent months have seen tech stocks tumble, making many investors rethink their strategy. Investors who enjoyed eye-popping returns of 20 percent or more in the late 1990s have been dealt a bitter dose of reality, with many seeing the value of their holdings plunge at the same time that capital gain distributions and dividends was jacking up their tax bill.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
You don't have to be rich to play with the rich on Wall Street. "One of the greatest developments of finance in recent years is the emergence of a variety of investment vehicles that allow people to make investments for small amounts of money," said Charles Carlson, chief executive of Horizon Investment Services in Hammond, Ind., and editor of a newsletter for investors. "There are mutual funds that allow someone to come in with as little as a $50 investment," he said. "There are company 401(k)
BUSINESS
By Russel Kinnel and Russel Kinnel,MORNINGSTAR.COM | April 23, 2000
Sector funds have always been a place where you invest to make an aggressive bet on a sector. Utilities funds used to be the exception, however. This was the place where grandparents invested to get a steady stream of income and get some shelter from the market. That was before deregulation and the information technology explosion that transformed sleepy phone companies. Utilities funds have been scattered across the investment map. Some go for fast-growing telecommunications stocks, while others have stuck with high-yielding electric utilities.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | April 5, 2000
If you plan to retire soon, Money magazine suggests investing the maximum amount you can in a tax-deferred account. "Invest heavily in stocks and mutual funds to maximize growth and keep you ahead of inflation," the article says. "Consider variable annuities, but buy only low-cost ones. Don't tap tax-deferred accounts for loans or early withdrawals, both to maximize the power of compounding and to avoid penalties and taxes." It also warns, "Don't count on seeing your living expenses fall in retirement.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Brown and Jeff Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 1999
What to give... What to give...A Buzz Lightyear? Some Pokemon cards?How about a college education? Or a lesson in the virtues of thrift and perseverance?When you give money, shares of stock, or mutual funds to a child, you know the gift can have long-lasting value that will grow over time.Cash is the easiest and most flexible gift. But if you want to give an investment that will grow, you may prefer mutual funds or stocks.In the old days, children were often given stock certificates. Today, many stocks, and all mutual funds, exist only as records held in accounts with brokerage or fund companies -- there is no certificate.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 1, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stocks closed mixed yesterday as a rebound in oil stocks and reports of growing economic strength offset the negative effects of higher interest rates.Stocks rallied after the Conference Board said its consumer confidence index jumped well above economists' expectations, to 71.2, from a revised 60.5 in October. Separately, the Chicago Purchasing Managers index of manufacturing conditions rose to 65.3 in November, from 57 in October.A rally in oil stocks pushed the Dow Jones industrial average up 6.15 points, to 3,683.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 4, 1998
JUDGING FROM letters and calls, many young and middle-age people are afraid to put -- or keep -- money in stocks at this high level.Stocks have shot straight up recently. This morning the Dow Jones industrial average stands at a record 8,584.83, up 676.58 points, or 8.5 percent, since New Year's Day and ahead 2,136.56 points, or 33.1 percent, since Jan 1, 1997.So, should you invest now?Yes. Feed every nickel you can into any retirement fund you are offered. Buy only stock mutual funds -- no bond or "income" funds, no money market accounts.
BUSINESS
By Bill Barnhart and By Bill Barnhart,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 6, 1998
Robert Stansky, manager of the world's largest mutual fund, Fidelity Magellan, has a modest definition of his job:"I'm basically an analyst who gets to buy some stocks," said the 42-year-old investor, who took command of the stock fund in 1996 after the previous manager made an ill-timed move into bonds (the $73 billion Magellan is currently closed to new investors).Stansky's self-effacement is overstated, given Magellan's enormous power to create self-fulfilling prophecies through its buy and sell decisions.
BUSINESS
By Bill Barnhart and Bill Barnhart,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 18, 1998
News that stock mutual funds suffered a net withdrawal of cash in August to the tune of $11.2 billion -- the first monthly net redemption in eight years -- eroded the belief that systematic mutual fund buying represents a safety net under stock prices.The long-running bull market engendered the expectation that American workers, individually empowered with tax-advantaged, employer-sponsored retirement savings plans such as 401(k) programs, would buy stocks through mutual funds in good markets and bad, with the convenience of payroll deductions.
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