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Stock Market Crash

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BUSINESS
By Staff Report | March 8, 1994
On Feb. 21, 1977, Julius Westheimer wrote his first column for The Evening Sun. Since then nothing -- not a stock market crash, vacations, bad weather, even illnesses in the family -- has stopped him from filing "The Ticker" twice weekly.Until this week, that is, when an illness ends his streak. He will return to his column-writing duties as soon as he is able.Mr. Westheimer, 77, grew up talking about stocks with his father, Milton F. Westheimer, over the dinner table. After a brief tenure in retailing, he worked for the Baltimore stock brokerage Baker Watts and Co. in 1961.
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FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 27, 1998
WHERE IS THE American economy headed? Should we be nervous? Will the stock market crash? Will we lose our jobs and our life savings and our homes? Will we ultimately have to ward off starvation by eating our household pets?Hold it! Let's calm down! There is no reason for that kind of thinking! Sure, the economy has been on a "roller coaster" of late, but let's consider the reassuring words of Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan in his recent speech before the Association of People Before Whom Alan Greenspan Gives Speeches.
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NEWS
By Diane Coyle | October 30, 1997
LONDON -- All the old jokes have been wheeled out here, the ones that start with skyscrapers and end with the punch line: ''It's raining brokers again tonight.''A financial crisis is always great drama, complete with pictures of panicking, shouting traders and a grave chorus of dark-suited experts punctuating the news bulletins.But the fact that the reaction to this week's stock market crash has slipped into the familiar routine of criticizing the financial markets as irrational and destructive should not obscure the fact that they play an ever more essential role.
NEWS
By Diane Coyle | October 30, 1997
LONDON -- All the old jokes have been wheeled out here, the ones that start with skyscrapers and end with the punch line: ''It's raining brokers again tonight.''A financial crisis is always great drama, complete with pictures of panicking, shouting traders and a grave chorus of dark-suited experts punctuating the news bulletins.But the fact that the reaction to this week's stock market crash has slipped into the familiar routine of criticizing the financial markets as irrational and destructive should not obscure the fact that they play an ever more essential role.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1991
NEW YORK -- Elizabeth Katsivelos was delighted when her telephone started ringing a few months ago. Wall Street firms were inquiring whether they might pay a visit to Columbia Business School to interview MBA candidates due to receive their diplomas in December."
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 27, 1998
WHERE IS THE American economy headed? Should we be nervous? Will the stock market crash? Will we lose our jobs and our life savings and our homes? Will we ultimately have to ward off starvation by eating our household pets?Hold it! Let's calm down! There is no reason for that kind of thinking! Sure, the economy has been on a "roller coaster" of late, but let's consider the reassuring words of Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan in his recent speech before the Association of People Before Whom Alan Greenspan Gives Speeches.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | April 18, 1997
"JUST BECAUSE the river is quiet doesn't mean all the crocodiles have left," runs an old saying.Although stocks have recovered about half their recent 9.7 percent losses, there's no guarantee we won't suffer another downturn. Since 1900, Wall Street has been hit with 29 bear market plunges of 20 percent or more, 50 severe corrections of 15 percent and 106 setbacks of at least 10 percent. How do we prepare for the next shock wave? Suggestions:If most of your stock "eggs" are in one basket, take some out. Then if one sector is hard hit -- as high-tech stocks were battered recently -- other categories cushion the overall decline and discourage panic selling.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
Douglas G. Ober sits back in his chair and lets a rare smile break through his normal quiet intensity. The youthful-looking chairman of Adams Express Co. and Petroleum & Resources Corp., two Baltimore investment firms, is thinking about his first job, and how it helped prepare him for a career of dealing with numbers in stressful times.Mr. Ober's first job as an aeronautical engineer placed him at the mercy of gung-ho Navy pilots, testing jets at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station during the Vietnam War. He remembers one roundtrip flight to Bermuda on an F-4 jet at Mach 2: the whole trip took 45 minutes.
BUSINESS
By Herb Greenberg and Herb Greenberg,Chronicle Features | January 25, 1991
The shorts are losing their shirts on defense stocks, especially McDonnell Douglas and Northrop -- two companies that have been mentioned recently in this column as being vulnerable to serious financial troubles.FTC Wartime euphoria has acted like a rocket booster to McDonnell Douglas, which is up more than 20 percent in the past few days; it now trades at about 35. Northrop, meanwhile, has gained about 10 percent since the conflict began, to its current level of about 20.But short-sellers argue that the war hasn't changed the fundamentals that attracted them to McDonnell Douglas and Northrop in the first place, and many are trying to short more stock.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1999
1986: Reagan tax reform1987: Stock market crash1988: RJR buyout1993: NationsBank buys Maryland National Bank
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | April 18, 1997
"JUST BECAUSE the river is quiet doesn't mean all the crocodiles have left," runs an old saying.Although stocks have recovered about half their recent 9.7 percent losses, there's no guarantee we won't suffer another downturn. Since 1900, Wall Street has been hit with 29 bear market plunges of 20 percent or more, 50 severe corrections of 15 percent and 106 setbacks of at least 10 percent. How do we prepare for the next shock wave? Suggestions:If most of your stock "eggs" are in one basket, take some out. Then if one sector is hard hit -- as high-tech stocks were battered recently -- other categories cushion the overall decline and discourage panic selling.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
Douglas G. Ober sits back in his chair and lets a rare smile break through his normal quiet intensity. The youthful-looking chairman of Adams Express Co. and Petroleum & Resources Corp., two Baltimore investment firms, is thinking about his first job, and how it helped prepare him for a career of dealing with numbers in stressful times.Mr. Ober's first job as an aeronautical engineer placed him at the mercy of gung-ho Navy pilots, testing jets at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station during the Vietnam War. He remembers one roundtrip flight to Bermuda on an F-4 jet at Mach 2: the whole trip took 45 minutes.
BUSINESS
By Staff Report | March 8, 1994
On Feb. 21, 1977, Julius Westheimer wrote his first column for The Evening Sun. Since then nothing -- not a stock market crash, vacations, bad weather, even illnesses in the family -- has stopped him from filing "The Ticker" twice weekly.Until this week, that is, when an illness ends his streak. He will return to his column-writing duties as soon as he is able.Mr. Westheimer, 77, grew up talking about stocks with his father, Milton F. Westheimer, over the dinner table. After a brief tenure in retailing, he worked for the Baltimore stock brokerage Baker Watts and Co. in 1961.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1991
NEW YORK -- Elizabeth Katsivelos was delighted when her telephone started ringing a few months ago. Wall Street firms were inquiring whether they might pay a visit to Columbia Business School to interview MBA candidates due to receive their diplomas in December."
BUSINESS
By Herb Greenberg and Herb Greenberg,Chronicle Features | January 25, 1991
The shorts are losing their shirts on defense stocks, especially McDonnell Douglas and Northrop -- two companies that have been mentioned recently in this column as being vulnerable to serious financial troubles.FTC Wartime euphoria has acted like a rocket booster to McDonnell Douglas, which is up more than 20 percent in the past few days; it now trades at about 35. Northrop, meanwhile, has gained about 10 percent since the conflict began, to its current level of about 20.But short-sellers argue that the war hasn't changed the fundamentals that attracted them to McDonnell Douglas and Northrop in the first place, and many are trying to short more stock.
NEWS
November 19, 1991
Fears of a reprise of 1987's stock market crash vanished yesterday as buyers cautiously returned to the market after Friday's 120-point plunge, the steepest one-day drop in two years.The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 29.52 points, or 1 percent, at 2,972.72, on heavy volume on the New York Stock Exchange. The rally was almost entirely confined to blue chips, however, as declining issues outpaced advancing ones by a 4-3 ratio overall.Article, Page 1D
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | July 24, 1991
TOKYO -- A 69-year-old political wheel horse narrowly fought off a challenge from the left yesterday for the right to lead the Socialists, Japan's main opposition party, through their worst crisis ever.Makoto Tanabe, a centrist 30-year career politician little known outside Japan will face wrenching challenges if he is to save his party from internal division and dwindling voter support.One of his first challenges will be a potentially disastrous stock market scandal.The political dimensions of that scandal, in which brokerages "compensated" a few hundred clients for huge losses in last year's stock market crash, have not become clear.
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