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By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
The Nasdaq composite index - a key gauge of the U.S. high-technology sector that only a year ago was an investor darling - closed yesterday at its lowest point since October 1998, after profit warnings and worries about a standoff with China touched off yet another stock market sell-off. Trading sent the Nasdaq down more than 109 points, or nearly 6.2 percent, to finish the day at 1,673 - a drop of two-thirds from the March 10, 2000, record close of 5,048.62. "Investors are overexposed" to the riskiest stocks, said John P. Hussman, portfolio manager of the Hussman Strategic Growth Fund, a mutual fund based in Ellicott City.
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BUSINESS
By Steven Syre and Steven Syre,Boston Globe | July 8, 2007
An explosion of new exchange-traded funds hitting the market is giving investors more ways to put their money to work every day. But how many do they really want? Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, have attracted hundreds of billions of dollars as an alternative to mutual fund investments in recent years. Mutual funds still pull in much more client money than exchange-traded funds, but ETFs have established themselves this decade as competitive products that appeal to many investors. Their assets, just $130 billion at the end of 2003, had grown to $480 billion by May. Investment management companies have responded to that kind of demand by burying investors in new products.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 2000
NEW YORK -- U.S. stock indexes rose to records in the last session of 1999, after the first countries to greet 2000 reported no sign of disruption from the Y2K bug. Qualcomm Inc., the biggest gainer of 1999, led the advance. "This was a pop-the-champagne-cork rally at the end of a great year," said Michelle Clayman, chief investment officer of New Amsterdam Partners LLC. "There is relief that Y2K is coming and going without any problems." The Nasdaq composite index rose 32.44, or 0.8 percent, to a record 4,069.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | December 30, 2006
In the end, the market beat money manager Bill Miller by 10 percentage points. Miller, who manages the Value Trust mutual fund at Baltimore-based Legg Mason Inc., has outperformed the market as measured by the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index for 15 consecutive years. But his quest to extend "The Streak" came to a close yesterday, when the fund ended the year with a 5.9 percent return, well below the S&P's 15.8 percent gain, including reinvested dividends. The streak has garnered publicity and investors for Legg Mason and Miller, whose unrivaled record made him recognized as one of America's best stock pickers.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 13, 2005
The debate over Social Security reform has exposed a little secret among professional money managers: They're not sure what they're doing, either. President Bush proposes that workers be allowed to divert part of their Social Security insurance premiums into private accounts, to be invested in professionally managed stock and bond funds. Workers naturally are wary. Perhaps coincidentally, the pros who would be asked to manage the money are having an anxiety attack as well. Rules of thumb that governed investing for decades are being questioned in the wake of the Nasdaq bubble and the widespread forecast of flat stock and bond markets for the next several years.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
The addition of three Maryland companies to closely monitored Russell stock indexes underscores investor recognition of the bullish prospects the companies enjoy, analysts and officials of the companies say.Baltimore-based Creditrust Corp., Annapolis-based USInternetworking Inc. and Lanham-based Radio One Inc. were among companies added yesterday to one or more of the broad stock indexes created and charted by Frank Russell Co.One of those, the Russell 2000 index, is the most widely referred to index of small public companies as measured by market value.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 16, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks soared to record highs yesterday as optimism spread that makers of consumer goods -- such as household products and drugs -- will post steadily increasing profits in coming quarters.The Dow Jones industrial average surged 50.94 to 4,922.75, breaking through the 4,900 mark for the first time. The latest rally came just nine months after the average first crossed 4,000.Procter & Gamble Co., Philip Morris Cos., Colgate-Palmolive Co., Eli Lilly & Co. and Walt Disney Cos. were among the stocks leading the advance.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | March 16, 1996
NEW YORK - U.S. stocks were mixed in heavy trading yesterday as rising bond yields dimmed the outlook for higher corporate profits this year. Semiconductor and computer stocks gained.Borrowing costs for companies and consumers rose after a report from the Federal Reserve showed booming activity at factories and utilities last month. If interest rates rise further and slow the economy's expansion, spending on goods and services will dry up and earnings could drop, investors said.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 1.09 to 5,584.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 17, 1995
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index squeaked to new highs yesterday even as the market posted its broadest decline since Jan. 30.The market's momentum faded as telephone and chemical issues weakened, overshadowing a jump in Hewlett-Packard Co. that rallied other technology stocks.The decline in stocks came as the dollar fell below 1.5 German marks for the first time in more than three months, raising concern about whether U.S. stocks and bonds will stay attractive to overseas investors.
BUSINESS
By Steven Syre and Steven Syre,Boston Globe | July 8, 2007
An explosion of new exchange-traded funds hitting the market is giving investors more ways to put their money to work every day. But how many do they really want? Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, have attracted hundreds of billions of dollars as an alternative to mutual fund investments in recent years. Mutual funds still pull in much more client money than exchange-traded funds, but ETFs have established themselves this decade as competitive products that appeal to many investors. Their assets, just $130 billion at the end of 2003, had grown to $480 billion by May. Investment management companies have responded to that kind of demand by burying investors in new products.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETRUNO and TOM PETRUNO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2006
You now can earn an annualized yield of 5.25 percent on a six-month U.S. Treasury bill, the most that security has paid in more than five years. Can't get too excited about 5.25 percent? True, it's barely halfway to a double-digit return. But as Albert Einstein noted, everything's relative. The T-bill rate is more than twice the 2.5 percent a year that the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index has earned over the past five years, including dividends. A 5.25 percent return, compounded, would double your money in 13.6 years.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | June 26, 2005
HEDGE funds are hyperactive investment schemes popular in the high-rent district. Index funds are passive, starter-home investments for the middle class. Even Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, a guru of free markets, warns of excesses in the hedge fund boom. Index funds also are proliferating, as Wall Street exploits the presumably safe "index fund" label to hawk dubious products. You can build a retirement nest egg with index funds. That's what President Bush intended when he proposed private Social Security accounts.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 13, 2005
The debate over Social Security reform has exposed a little secret among professional money managers: They're not sure what they're doing, either. President Bush proposes that workers be allowed to divert part of their Social Security insurance premiums into private accounts, to be invested in professionally managed stock and bond funds. Workers naturally are wary. Perhaps coincidentally, the pros who would be asked to manage the money are having an anxiety attack as well. Rules of thumb that governed investing for decades are being questioned in the wake of the Nasdaq bubble and the widespread forecast of flat stock and bond markets for the next several years.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
The Nasdaq composite index - a key gauge of the U.S. high-technology sector that only a year ago was an investor darling - closed yesterday at its lowest point since October 1998, after profit warnings and worries about a standoff with China touched off yet another stock market sell-off. Trading sent the Nasdaq down more than 109 points, or nearly 6.2 percent, to finish the day at 1,673 - a drop of two-thirds from the March 10, 2000, record close of 5,048.62. "Investors are overexposed" to the riskiest stocks, said John P. Hussman, portfolio manager of the Hussman Strategic Growth Fund, a mutual fund based in Ellicott City.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2000
While the Nasdaq composite index and the Dow Jones industrial average saw their biggest point swings to date yesterday, the index of leading Maryland companies ended the day with a bigger percentage drop. The Sun-Bloomberg Maryland index of the top 100 Maryland stocks lost 9.56 points yesterday -- down 3.74 percent -- to close at 246.04, after a 4.8 percent loss Monday. The Nasdaq and the Dow respectively were down 1.77 percent and 0.51 percent yesterday. The Maryland index rose 54 percent in the first two months of this year, setting a record 347.07 March 6. But it has fallen steadily since then, marking its biggest one-day loss -- 7.46 percent -- March 14, as investors turned away from technology and biotechnology issues.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 1, 2000
NEW YORK -- U.S. stock indexes rose to records in the last session of 1999, after the first countries to greet 2000 reported no sign of disruption from the Y2K bug. Qualcomm Inc., the biggest gainer of 1999, led the advance. "This was a pop-the-champagne-cork rally at the end of a great year," said Michelle Clayman, chief investment officer of New Amsterdam Partners LLC. "There is relief that Y2K is coming and going without any problems." The Nasdaq composite index rose 32.44, or 0.8 percent, to a record 4,069.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 4, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks, buoyed by the biggest one-day rally in bonds since March, leapt to record highs yesterday on expectations the economy will generate steady profit growth without inflation.The advance on the New York Stock Exchange was the broadest in almost six weeks, as Treasury bond yields slid to an 11-month low of 7.24 percent.The catalyst for both rallies was a government report that predicted weaker economic activity over the next six months."Everybody has been expecting a slowdown, and now we're in the teeth of it," said William Harnisch, president and chief investment officer of Forstmann-Leff Associates Inc., which manages about $3 billion for institutional investors and hedge funds.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 17, 1993
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones industrial average closed at an all-time high yesterday -- by 0.27 point -- partly because of computerized trading programs timed to go off when the Dow approaches a high.The Dow rose 22.69 points, to 3,478.61, exceeding its March 10 high of 3,478.34. But the slight rise in the broader-based Standard & Poor's 500 index provided a better measure of what much of this week's trading seemed to be: meandering.Amid no clear indication of whether the economy is strengthening, the market's performance yesterday was a tale of these two indexes.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
The addition of three Maryland companies to closely monitored Russell stock indexes underscores investor recognition of the bullish prospects the companies enjoy, analysts and officials of the companies say.Baltimore-based Creditrust Corp., Annapolis-based USInternetworking Inc. and Lanham-based Radio One Inc. were among companies added yesterday to one or more of the broad stock indexes created and charted by Frank Russell Co.One of those, the Russell 2000 index, is the most widely referred to index of small public companies as measured by market value.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 19, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose yesterday for the fourth time this week, as gains in telephone and tobacco shares offset declines in companies whose fortunes depend on a growing economy.Traders attributed the late-day rise to the simultaneous expiration of futures and options on U.S. stock indexes and options on individual stocks.Six computer-guided buy programs and six sell programs had the net effect of adding about 66 points to the Dow, and eight points to the S&P 500, according to research firm Birinyi Associates Inc.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 21.89 to 7,895.
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