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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1992
Wesley Snipes is such a singular, riveting presence on screen it seems a shame to waste him on something as generic as "Passenger 57." It's like putting Anthony Hopkins or Al Pacino in an Alpo commercialThe hijack thriller is cobbled together out of pieces of other movies that, generally, weren't any good either. It's strictly a for-the-dollars and by-the-numbers money machine.Snipes plays some kind of vaguely defined "security expert" who is haunted by guilt because he tried to stop a holdup at a convenience store and only succeeded in getting his wife killed.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Filmmakers never seem to tire of making films about how hard it was growing up amid the racial turbulence that rocked the Deep South in the early 1960s.The latest to join the ranks is Goldie Hawn, who makes her directorial debut at 8 tonight on TNT with the carefully layered and well-acted "Hope."The film stars Jena Malone, who was so impressive as an abused child in "Bastard Out of Carolina." Malone plays Lilly Kate Burns, a young girl living with her maternal aunt in a small Southern town called Hope.
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By Marc Leepson | February 7, 1993
US.Wayne Karlin.Henry Holt.` 215 pages. $22.50.Wayne Karlin is one of the most literarily accomplished Vietnam veterans. A former Marine helicopter crewman, he has written four novels and a book of short stories. He makes his living teaching literature at Charles County Community College and at the University of Massachusetts' William Joiner Center.Mr. Karlin's Vietnam-heavy "Lost Armies" (1988), which is set in a fictionalized Eastern Shore town, is an underappreciated gem. Among its other qualities, "Lost Armies" is one of the very few pieces of fiction that deals with Vietnam veterans' psychological problems without sensationalizing the issue or stereotyping the troubled vet.In "Lost Armies," Mr. Karlin showed off a distinctive, biting writing style.
NEWS
By Marc Leepson | February 7, 1993
US.Wayne Karlin.Henry Holt.` 215 pages. $22.50.Wayne Karlin is one of the most literarily accomplished Vietnam veterans. A former Marine helicopter crewman, he has written four novels and a book of short stories. He makes his living teaching literature at Charles County Community College and at the University of Massachusetts' William Joiner Center.Mr. Karlin's Vietnam-heavy "Lost Armies" (1988), which is set in a fictionalized Eastern Shore town, is an underappreciated gem. Among its other qualities, "Lost Armies" is one of the very few pieces of fiction that deals with Vietnam veterans' psychological problems without sensationalizing the issue or stereotyping the troubled vet.In "Lost Armies," Mr. Karlin showed off a distinctive, biting writing style.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Filmmakers never seem to tire of making films about how hard it was growing up amid the racial turbulence that rocked the Deep South in the early 1960s.The latest to join the ranks is Goldie Hawn, who makes her directorial debut at 8 tonight on TNT with the carefully layered and well-acted "Hope."The film stars Jena Malone, who was so impressive as an abused child in "Bastard Out of Carolina." Malone plays Lilly Kate Burns, a young girl living with her maternal aunt in a small Southern town called Hope.
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By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2006
City of Shadows Ariana Franklin Malicious Intent Kathryn Fox Harper Paperbacks / 380 pages / $13.95 A good forensic thriller is difficult to find; too many of them rely too heavily on jargon and stock characters to advance the story, leading to too much forensic and not enough thriller. Fortunately, Kathryn Fox, an Australia-based doctor, fuses both elements with a sure touch because she renders her heroine, freelance forensic pathologist Anya Crichton, as a human being whose life is endangered by the work she does.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 11, 2005
The Chorus is unabashedly sentimental and just as unabashedly cliched. All that doesn't make it necessarily bad, but it does make it lazy - a classic case of a film that's fine for those who like this sort of thing, anathema for those who don't. Like Mr. Holland's Opus, like The Dead Poets Society, like To Sir, With Love, The Chorus is the story of a dedicated teacher who finds himself in a class of miscreants determined to make his life miserable. Does it surprise anyone to hear the teacher is so dedicated that they learn in spite of themselves?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 14, 2001
The Man Who Cried is proof that good intentions alone do not a good movie make. Writer-director Sally Potter (Orlando, The Tango Lesson) has crafted a movie with things to say about persecution, about a woman's search for identity, about the human capacity to endure. But she's wrapped it in a story that unfolds as though it were written by Sidney Sheldon, filled with stock characters, ridiculous situations and eye-rolling plot twists. Fegele is a little Jewish girl living happily with her father in a Russian village in 1927.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 15, 2008
Fly Me to the Moon, the animated tale of three flies who find themselves reluctant stowaways on the Apollo 11 moon flight, exists for only one reason: to showcase the 3D work of its director, Belgian-born Ben Stassen, and his production company, nWave Pictures. To that end, it excels. The 3D work is quite marvelous, ranging from the awesomely impressive, as when the huge rocket lifts off from its launching pad, to the delightfully puckish, as when the three young flies - Nat, Scooter and I.Q. - savor the weightlessness of space.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 22, 2006
Debbie Isitt's sweet, fizzless British mockumentary Confetti contains too many moments that mockumentary master Christopher Guest (Best in Show, A Mighty Wind) would have left on the cutting room floor - or never taken to the soundstage. This tale of three couples competing for the title of "most original wedding of the year" in a promotion cooked up by a bridal magazine, also called Confetti, is woefully unoriginal as an improvisational farce. The setup is promising. As the deviser of the contest says, most people would not want to have their wedding taken over by a gimmick, but some would.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1992
Wesley Snipes is such a singular, riveting presence on screen it seems a shame to waste him on something as generic as "Passenger 57." It's like putting Anthony Hopkins or Al Pacino in an Alpo commercialThe hijack thriller is cobbled together out of pieces of other movies that, generally, weren't any good either. It's strictly a for-the-dollars and by-the-numbers money machine.Snipes plays some kind of vaguely defined "security expert" who is haunted by guilt because he tried to stop a holdup at a convenience store and only succeeded in getting his wife killed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Think of "Third Watch" as "ER" times three.Apparently not satisfied with the medical mayhem chronicled weekly on his "ER" juggernaut, executive producer John Wells triples the freneticism in this new dramatic series (which moves to its regular time slot this Sunday at 8) by focusing on the entire emergency services crew on duty during the 3 p.m.-11 p.m. shift in a New York precinct.That means you've got paramedics, firefighters and police officers practically tripping over each other, trying to keep the population safe.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2001
Rated NC-17 (sex, nudity). Sun score: *** 1/2 Writer-director Michael Cuesta's L.I.E. (short for Long Island Expressway) bravely tackles adolescence, sexuality and perversity by treating them as they really are: conditions of unfathomable complexity that defy categorization but are ignored (or oversimplified) at mankind's peril. Howie Blitzer (Paul Franklin Dano) is a teen-age loner, though not by choice: His mother is dead, his father's a swindler, his friends a directionless bunch burglarizing homes in Long Island.
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