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By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
If you're ever in line behind Microsoft's Bill Gates at Nordstrom, and he charges the polo shirt on MasterCard, and he throws the yellow slip in the trash, dive in there and get it.It might be worth something someday.As capitalism tightens its embrace on the planet, the residue of tycoons is becoming a valuable commodity.Collectors bored of coins and enticed by history are stoking a trade in old stock certificates, bond coupons and other financial flotsam. Documents once stuffed in barristers' files are seeing the light of the 1990s, matted, framed and hanging in living rooms.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,sun reporter | November 8, 2006
Tony Terranova, a professional coin collector from New York City, will have a chance to diversify his collection when more than 100 hand-engraved steel plates go on the auction block today. The plates belonged to the American Bank Note Co. and were used to print stock certificates, bank notes and engravings of presidents. Private and professional collectors began gathering at the Pier 5 Hotel at the Inner Harbor yesterday for the two-day auction. Thousands of coins, some valued at as much as $600,000, were auctioned the first day; the plates are to be auctioned today.
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BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | February 1, 2004
My husband and I own shares of Lucent Technologies Inc. We've held these many years. What is the outlook for this company? - M.L., Chicago Long-term shareholders in this giant telecommunications equipment maker have seen fire and rain. Shares of Lucent (LU) are up 43 percent this year, adding to a gain of 125 percent in 2003. But that stellar performance follows declines of 75 percent the year before, 53 percent in 2001 and 81 percent in 2000 as the telecom industry suffered through its worst slump in history.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | February 1, 2004
My husband and I own shares of Lucent Technologies Inc. We've held these many years. What is the outlook for this company? - M.L., Chicago Long-term shareholders in this giant telecommunications equipment maker have seen fire and rain. Shares of Lucent (LU) are up 43 percent this year, adding to a gain of 125 percent in 2003. But that stellar performance follows declines of 75 percent the year before, 53 percent in 2001 and 81 percent in 2000 as the telecom industry suffered through its worst slump in history.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | November 19, 1995
Due to a flood in our basement, we lost most of the records of our stocks. We have the initial cost and the stock certificates but did not recover the stock splits or dividend reinvestments. How can we get this additional information?If you hold the actual certificates in your name, the transfer agent should be able to give you information on the number of shares you currently own, reflecting all stock splits and any reinvested dividends.If you used a dividend-reinvestment program offered by the companies whose stock you own, the investor-relations or shareholder-services departments should be able to get a copy of your records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ralph Blumenthal and Ralph Blumenthal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2003
What would John D. Rockefeller say? In the basement of his Standard Oil Building, just steps from Wall Street, where the Museum of American Financial History celebrates the wonders of capitalism, an exhibit wall is papered with gaily colored stock certificates carrying names like Enron, WorldCom and ImClone Systems. It's the dark side of the American dream. But the dot-com debacles and infamous bankruptcies of the infant millennium are as much part of the nation's financial heritage as scandals of the past and the stock market crash of 1929, say historians at the museum, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | October 22, 1995
I have several stock certificates I wish to sell to a friend. Do I have to go through a brokerage firm, or can we handle the transaction between ourselves? If we can handle it without a brokerage firm, how do we notify the company of the new stock ownership?My first question to you is: Why do you want to avoid a broker? You will certainly be complicating matters for yourself.But, if you choose to do it yourself, here is what you will need to do:* Ascertain that the stock is registered properly and can be sold.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY | June 4, 1995
Q: My son told me I should put my stock certificates in a brokerage account.He said a new regulation will reduce the settlement period and could create problems for me.I'm happy keeping my stock in a bank safety-deposit box and collecting the dividends myself. What is this new law? When does it go into effect? Will it hurt me? What do you recommend I do?A: I've always been in favor of keeping stocks in a brokerage account, preferably at a discount brokerage firm that does not charge an annual fee or an "inactive" account fee.The new rule your son mentioned -- called "T-Plus-Three" in Wall Street jargon -- tightens the current five-day settlement period for trades to three days and takes effect June 7, 1995.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 28, 2001
SADLY, it's time to say goodbye. This is my last column. When Ticker was born almost 25 years ago - Feb. 22, 1977, to be exact - the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 939.26. This morning it is at 10,131.31, a gain of nearly 979 percent. Today, 2,300 columns and about 2 million words later, thanks to our many readers for loyalty. I appreciate your kindly letters, cards, calls, for over a quarter of a century. Since Ticker first ticked, we've seen many changes. Most important: better-informed investors, thanks to an outpouring of financial books, magazines, newsletters, seminars, evening courses, TV shows, computerized research and professionally trained brokers.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 11, 1996
TODAY, we present suggestions about your money and your career.GROW LIKE TOPSY: "The most valuable benefit that retirement plans provide is tax deferral for compounded investment returns. Over a period of years, this can be much more valuable than the one-time tax saving from your contribution to the plan." (David Rhine, partner, BDO Seidman Co.)LET THEM PAY: "If you plan to take a class this fall, ask your company to reimburse you for the tuition. Many companies do this. Not only do you save money, but you also increase your earning potential."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ralph Blumenthal and Ralph Blumenthal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2003
What would John D. Rockefeller say? In the basement of his Standard Oil Building, just steps from Wall Street, where the Museum of American Financial History celebrates the wonders of capitalism, an exhibit wall is papered with gaily colored stock certificates carrying names like Enron, WorldCom and ImClone Systems. It's the dark side of the American dream. But the dot-com debacles and infamous bankruptcies of the infant millennium are as much part of the nation's financial heritage as scandals of the past and the stock market crash of 1929, say historians at the museum, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 28, 2001
SADLY, it's time to say goodbye. This is my last column. When Ticker was born almost 25 years ago - Feb. 22, 1977, to be exact - the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 939.26. This morning it is at 10,131.31, a gain of nearly 979 percent. Today, 2,300 columns and about 2 million words later, thanks to our many readers for loyalty. I appreciate your kindly letters, cards, calls, for over a quarter of a century. Since Ticker first ticked, we've seen many changes. Most important: better-informed investors, thanks to an outpouring of financial books, magazines, newsletters, seminars, evening courses, TV shows, computerized research and professionally trained brokers.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 11, 1996
TODAY, we present suggestions about your money and your career.GROW LIKE TOPSY: "The most valuable benefit that retirement plans provide is tax deferral for compounded investment returns. Over a period of years, this can be much more valuable than the one-time tax saving from your contribution to the plan." (David Rhine, partner, BDO Seidman Co.)LET THEM PAY: "If you plan to take a class this fall, ask your company to reimburse you for the tuition. Many companies do this. Not only do you save money, but you also increase your earning potential."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
If you're ever in line behind Microsoft's Bill Gates at Nordstrom, and he charges the polo shirt on MasterCard, and he throws the yellow slip in the trash, dive in there and get it.It might be worth something someday.As capitalism tightens its embrace on the planet, the residue of tycoons is becoming a valuable commodity.Collectors bored of coins and enticed by history are stoking a trade in old stock certificates, bond coupons and other financial flotsam. Documents once stuffed in barristers' files are seeing the light of the 1990s, matted, framed and hanging in living rooms.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | December 24, 1995
A priest gets up in the pulpit and says to his congregation: "I have bad news, good news and bad news: The bad news is that the church has a leak in the roof. The good news is that we have the resources to fix it. The bad news is that the resources are in your pockets."If you're thinking about making any major donations this year, giving appreciated stocks to charities is definitely a good idea. You don't pay commissions to sell the stock, you don't pay capital gains tax and you get to deduct the full market value of the gift.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | November 19, 1995
Due to a flood in our basement, we lost most of the records of our stocks. We have the initial cost and the stock certificates but did not recover the stock splits or dividend reinvestments. How can we get this additional information?If you hold the actual certificates in your name, the transfer agent should be able to give you information on the number of shares you currently own, reflecting all stock splits and any reinvested dividends.If you used a dividend-reinvestment program offered by the companies whose stock you own, the investor-relations or shareholder-services departments should be able to get a copy of your records.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 21, 1994
Your stock certificates, unfortunately, are worthless.Over the years, those somber words have appeared many times this column in response to readers whose dusty attics and desk drawers had offered up old certificates that they fervently hoped would be of financial value.There have been quite a few successes, such as the family last year whose holdings turned out to be worth more than $30,000. They hadn't realized that the obscure company whose name was on their certificate had merged into another that was still alive and kicking.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 24, 1992
He slid a 2-inch stack of stock certificates across the dinner table, and with a smile that seemed to contain a wink, Sam Macatee offered me 1,000 shares of American Multi-Lert -- at no charge. The certificates were made of high-quality paper, handsomely engraved with a distinctive bank-note blue border. Each bore the corporate seal of American Multi-Lert and the signatures of its officers. The certificates appeared to be the genuine article.Except that they were worthless."You can wallpaper a room with them," Sam Macatee said.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | October 22, 1995
I have several stock certificates I wish to sell to a friend. Do I have to go through a brokerage firm, or can we handle the transaction between ourselves? If we can handle it without a brokerage firm, how do we notify the company of the new stock ownership?My first question to you is: Why do you want to avoid a broker? You will certainly be complicating matters for yourself.But, if you choose to do it yourself, here is what you will need to do:* Ascertain that the stock is registered properly and can be sold.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY | June 4, 1995
Q: My son told me I should put my stock certificates in a brokerage account.He said a new regulation will reduce the settlement period and could create problems for me.I'm happy keeping my stock in a bank safety-deposit box and collecting the dividends myself. What is this new law? When does it go into effect? Will it hurt me? What do you recommend I do?A: I've always been in favor of keeping stocks in a brokerage account, preferably at a discount brokerage firm that does not charge an annual fee or an "inactive" account fee.The new rule your son mentioned -- called "T-Plus-Three" in Wall Street jargon -- tightens the current five-day settlement period for trades to three days and takes effect June 7, 1995.
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