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By GILBERT SANDLER | October 26, 1993
IT IS Friday evening, April 21, 1961. About 7:30 the cars are bumper-to-bumper on U.S. 1 south of Baltimore. Their occupants are coming to watch what happens when old cars and young men and women and oil and grease and collapsing metal and smoke and fire come together on a clay track under the Howard County sky.It's another night of stock car racing at the Dorsey Speedway. We're talking stock car racing as it used to be -- rough, rowdy and slightly disreputable. Although a couple of tracks remain in Maryland in the Dorsey tradition, stock car racing has gone national, drawing huge crowds and making household names of Earnhardt, Petty and others who have become millionaires in the sport.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Many years ago, longtime NASCAR crew chief Harry Hyde said a stock car is "like an egg. You have to handle it gently or it will break. " Though at its heart it was true, it was a shocking statement. Who compares a stock car — a big, brute of a car — to such a thin-shelled egg? That philosophy may have found its match during a Grand Prix of Baltimore interview with Helio Castroneves when he compared driving an Indy car to dancing. "There are no secrets," Castroneves said, when asked how competitors on Dancing with the Stars are able to perform intricate moves so quickly.
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SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | August 4, 1995
The start of the inaugural running of the Brickyard 400 NASCAR race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway last year was just a couple of hours away when ABC's Paul Page noticed the absence of the kind of long lines of fans that surround the Indianapolis 500.Frankly, Page, who, at that moment, was doing the pre-race show on ESPN, was a little concerned that stock car racing's introduction to the most hallowed auto race track in America might not be so accepted,...
EXPLORE
October 12, 2011
From the pages of the Havre de Grace Record dated Thursday morning, Oct. 12, 1961: The biggest story, or at least the one with the big headline across the top of the front page, was inexplicably that "Teachers To Convene October 19. " As tradition has it, that weekend in October is for the Maryland State Teachers Convention. In 1961, it was the 94th annual convention of the Maryland State Teachers Association with 20,000 teachers expected to converge on Baltimore. The lengthy story didn't say anything about whether schools would be closed, but with a full convention agenda, it was probably understood that schools would be closed.
FEATURES
By Tom Patterson and Tom Patterson,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 1999
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- Since its advent in the years after World War II, stock car racing has enjoyed a wide following in the South, and North Carolina has been one of the hotbeds of this daredevil motor sport.In hopes of capitalizing on its mass appeal, the Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art is presenting "Just Racin': Art on Wheels," a show of contemporary works inspired by stock car racing. Most of the works were created for this show, which runs through Aug. 27, and few of the 29 artists had demonstrated any particular interest in racing before they were invited to participate.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillion | December 2, 1990
Roy Coghill, a longtime stock car driver from Sykesville, looked through a scrapbook of old newspaper clippings and photos taken during the 1950s."They were the good old days," he repeated as he reminisced about the races he won, the accidents he had, the mechanical woes he suffered and the friends he made as if it were yesterday.They say once racing gets in your blood, you never get rid of it. Today, at 59, he has built a copy of his original 1950s race car and competes against other cars of that era.Coghill's father, Rudy, had raced through the Virginia hills, running moonshine, until the family left Hartwood, Va., for Baltimore in the late 1940s.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
Joe Gibbs may have caught the NFL off guard yesterday when he announced his retirement as Washington Redskins coach, but in the garages at Richmond (Va.) International Raceway, crew chief Jimmy Makar wasn't surprised."I saw it coming for a long while," said Makar, who runs Gibbs' Winston Cup stock car team. "And he's been thinking about it ever since the NFL season ended. It wasn't a snap decision by any means. He's been thinking about it a long time."Makar said that in particular, Gibbs had talked about wanting to spend more time with his family.
SPORTS
By Tom Higgins and Tom Higgins,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 29, 1992
DARLINGTON, S.C. -- Speeding across the wide-screen TV, Red Byron and his NASCAR rivals from stock car racing's early days charge sideways off a turn at a dirt track and disappear into a dust cloud that swirls like a tornado.Across the room, a voice tells of the feats of drivers who have become folk heroes: Buck Baker, Fireball Roberts, Curtis Turner, Junior Johnson, Ned Jarrett and the three Flock brothers, Bob, Fonty and Tim.Pylons featuring the likenesses of these men and 32 others stretch from floor to ceiling and are covered with memorabilia.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
RICHMOND, Va. -- Wally Dallenbach Jr. is driving a Ford Thunderbird, the hottest model stock car on the Winston Cup circuit. But Dallenbach's Ford isn't a front-runner, 14l a fact that doesn't bother Dallenbach, who still is learning the ropes.It is an unusual position for Dallenbach, the son of the successful former IndyCar driver, Wally Dallenbach, who is now the director of competition and chief steward of the IndyCar circuit.Dallenbach grew up snowmobiling with Michael Andretti and Al Unser Jr. He grew up at his father's side in the world of Indianapolis-style racing, the world of open cockpits and open-wheel racing.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
Winston Cup racing lost a pioneer yesterday when Lee Petty died at the age of 86. Petty, patriarch of what is believed to be the only four-generation family of athletes in major American sports, died in Greensboro, N.C. He had remained in intensive care at Moses Cone Hospital after February surgery for a stomach aneurysm. Petty was a part of stock car racing from the first days of NASCAR, beginning his career with an eight-race schedule in 1949 and going on to notch 55 career wins. He won the inaugural Daytona 500 in 1959 and became the sport's first three-time champion in the Grand National Series, which later was renamed Winston Cup. The Petty family made no statements yesterday, leaving it to others to talk about the man who founded the winningest organization in American motorsports.
SPORTS
By Mike Miller, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Jeff Oleen's racing career began 12 years ago with an old, ramshackle go kart his father bought for him to restore. And for much of his youth, racing was just a hobby for Oleen. Spending Saturdays at the track meant a chance to bond with his father. The Bethesda native quickly demonstrated an innate ability, winning five consecutive go kart championships between ages 12 and 16 at Sandy Hook Speedway in Street, Md. Kart racing led to formula racing and then to stock car racing.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli | July 21, 2010
Certain races mean more than others, and tradition tells us this weekend's Brickyard 400 is one of those. Location is mostly the reason. Indianapolis Motor Speedway with its yard of bricks at the start-finish line and milk-stained victory lane is why the Brickyard 400 matters at all. To drivers who hail from Indiana — Tony Stewart, Ryan Newman and Jeff Gordon, to some extent — it means the closest thing to a hometown race. To a guy like team owner Chip Ganassi, who won this year's Indy 500 with Dario Franchitti, Indianapolis means a chance to pull an unprecedented triple.
SPORTS
March 24, 2010
Sunday's race in Martinsville, Va., will mark the first Car of Tomorrow race for NASCAR with a spoiler instead of a wing. Stock car purists have to be pleased at the change. The spoiler makes the car look more like a traditional stock car. As for the changes in racing? Even the drivers don't know what to expect. "There's not a lot of characteristic difference from the driver's seat because they did a good job making sure, from an aero standpoint," said Kevin Harvick, who participated in a test at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
Coming to a mall near you: the Daytona 500. No, not that Daytona 500, the so-called Great American Race. The Daytona 500 fragrance, which "embodies the confidence, power and intensity of the men daring enough to race in the ultimate adrenaline rush." If cologne doesn't get your motor started, there's plenty more for the NASCAR lover in anyone. Those in need of a heart-racing boost can check out In the Groove, the first Harlequin romance novel based on stock car racing. Families fixing for a cookout can stock up on NASCAR-brand hot dogs, smoked sausages and fresh produce.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The sun has just gone down and the lights at Lowe's Motor Speedway have come up, showcasing more than 150 race cars crowded into the infield. Up in the stands, mixed in with family and fans, will be some of NASCAR's most successful car owners, all of them on the lookout for the next Jeff Gordon or Kurt Busch. On this night, they have come to watch dozens of children ages 8 to 14 roar around a 1/5-mile oval at 80 mph to more than 100 mph. And it doesn't matter that many of the kids can't even touch the pedals of a car on a showroom floor because the newest trend among Nextel Cup car owners is to stockpile talent - even if that means signing youngsters still in middle school.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | March 7, 2004
Put on the 3-D glasses at the Maryland Science Center at the Inner Harbor and two things happen: You find NASCAR's Nextel Cup racing virtually in your lap and you get to go for some daring, breathless rides. The film, NASCAR: The IMAX Experience, which opens Friday, is a documentary and reality show in one. It begins with a 1940's car chase that is supposed to suggest the good old days, when racing legend Junior Johnson - among others - would outrun the law on North Carolina's back roads.
FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SANDRA MCKEE is a sports writer for The Sun | August 2, 1992
"There are only three real sports. Mountain climbing, bull fighting and auto racing. Everything else is a game . . ." Ernest Hemingway.Seen on a sweat shirt at a stock car race It's hot. Noses are burning. Shoulders blistering. Knees turning as red as a steamed Maryland crab, but those facts never register with fans of major-league stock car racing.Cold, rain, snow fail to deter them, too. Hands may numb and lips turn as blue as the Chesapeake Bay, but the fans grip their cups of coffee or hot chocolate in one hand, tuck their blankets around their legs with the other and never complain.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
RANDLEMAN, N.C. -- As the long white bus with the words "Richard Petty for Secretary of State" in blue script on its sides rolls to a halt, there is no one to be seen in Bunn, N.C. But when Richard Petty emerges onto the street, this town of 364 residents suddenly is alive.Folks emerge from every doorway. Cars and trucks pull to the curb. People rush toward the candidate, a slim man dressed in jeans, sport jacket, black felt cowboy hat and dark sunglasses. After signing napkins, wallets and shirts, he inches farther down the street, leaving Rhonda Cox enthralled.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
In Sunday's Daytona 500, Nextel Cup teams will begin racing under NASCAR's new points system that essentially sets up a regular season and a postseason. It is a system that is being met with a wait-and-see attitude by some, and one that is causing some teams to rethink their strategies. But at least one driver has no problem with the change that is bringing stock car racing more in line with other pro sports. "Until now, we've been the only major form of team sports without a postseason or playoff," Jeff Burton said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Twenty-four years ago, NASCAR put its rough-hewn roots on display for the whole country when two of its stars traded punches on the track during stock car racing's biggest event. Those within NASCAR say it was one of the best things that ever happened to the sport. Obviously, times have changed. Jimmy Spencer punched fellow driver Kurt Busch in the face while he was still sitting in his race car after Sunday's Winston Cup race at Michigan International Speedway, and Spencer was suspended by NASCAR until Tuesday.
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