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BUSINESS
June 12, 2004
No tables U.S. stock and bond markets were closed yesterday in observance of a national day of mourning for former President Ronald Reagan. No stock tables appear today.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho h and Hanah Cho h,anah.cho@baltsun.com | October 10, 2008
Shares of Baltimore's Legg Mason Inc. suffered the largest one-day percentage drop in its history as a public company yesterday and plunged to their lowest price in almost 10 years. Legg's shares fell nearly 25 percent, or $6.25, to $19 in a broad market sell-off amid continuing fears over the credit markets, weakening consumer spending and the economy as a whole. The Dow Jones industrial average closed below 9,000 for the first time since 2003. The Wall Street turmoil also punished stocks of other Baltimore-area companies and financial institutions.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES | April 14, 1996
NEW YORK -- Despite last week's rough ride in the stock and bond markets, evidence mounted that investors were not losing their appetites for stock and bond mutual funds. Far from it: A mutual fund trade group estimated that investors poured more cash into stock and bond funds in the first quarter of 1996 than in the first nine months of last year.The Investment Company Institute, a mutual fund trade group, estimated that stock and bond funds took in a net $23 billion in March. While that was down slightly from February's total, it also supported contentions by mutual fund companies that individual investors did not flee the markets after a sharp decline in stock prices early last month.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS | August 19, 2007
Should you bolt from your stocks and stock mutual funds? Perhaps you've been tempted as the stock market has plunged repeatedly since mid-July. Virtually everything you own - whether you invest in U.S. stocks or those overseas - has probably plunged during the past four weeks. The average mutual fund that invests in U.S. stocks has lost about 7 percent, and the average fund that invests around the world is down about 8.7 percent, according to Lipper Inc. Some analysts think the worst is over and investors will calm down as they see the end of missteps with exotic mortgage-related securities.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Cash flows into mutual funds that invest in stocks slowed a bit in May from April's level, but demand remained strong, with aggressive growth funds continuing to attract the largest portion of assets, an industry group estimated last week.Mutual funds that invest primarily in stocks took in an estimated $22.5 billion in net new cash in May, down from April's total of $26.4 billion but still the third highest monthly total on record, according to the Investment Company Institute of Washington.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Ever the contrarian, Legg Mason Inc. plans to take advantage of the relatively slow times in the stock and bond markets to open as many as five new retail brokerage offices this year."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Top administration economists have stoutly rejected suggestions by Federal Reserve officials that the central bank not consider cutting short-term interest rates because of fear that this could fuel an unwanted speculative bubble in stocks and bonds.The economists said near-record stock and bond levels in no way constituted a bubble, but were rather a justified response to lower interest rates, which they said were fostered by lower inflation and President Clinton's deficit-reduction efforts.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 13, 2005
The debate over Social Security reform has exposed a little secret among professional money managers: They're not sure what they're doing, either. President Bush proposes that workers be allowed to divert part of their Social Security insurance premiums into private accounts, to be invested in professionally managed stock and bond funds. Workers naturally are wary. Perhaps coincidentally, the pros who would be asked to manage the money are having an anxiety attack as well. Rules of thumb that governed investing for decades are being questioned in the wake of the Nasdaq bubble and the widespread forecast of flat stock and bond markets for the next several years.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | April 24, 1991
Alex. Brown Inc. said yesterday that it earned more during the first three months of 1991 than in all of 1990 and gave much of the credit to a rising stock market that boosted the Baltimore investment bank's stock and bond trading commissions and investment banking fees.Alex. Brown earned $10.6 million, or 66 cents a share, during the first quarter, which ended March 29. The company earned only $2.5 million, or 16 cents a share, in the first quarter of last year."In general, the industry had a very good quarter," said Beverly L. Wright, Alex.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Further interest rate increases remain "an open question" because inflation's warning signs are "mixed," Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan told the Senate Banking Committee yesterday.But he gave no hint that another move by the Fed is imminent.In one of his semiannual reviews of the economy, Mr. Greenspan also told senators the dollar's recent 5 percent slide against the yen, and its dips against other major currencies, are "bad for the economy" and warned against letting the greenback become so weak as to provoke "a flight from the world's prime reserve currency."
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Tribune Media Services | August 5, 2007
This is what you call "contagion." With revelations throughout the past week that the housing recession is intensifying and infecting stock and bond investments, as well as lending practices, investors have focused on what could go wrong. "Recession chatter is surfacing," said Merrill Lynch economist David Rosenberg. With homeowners still facing mortgage adjustments of an extra 5 or 6 percentage points on their mortgage interest rate, consumers could face more foreclosures and struggle so much with monthly payments that they will cut back sharply on purchases.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,SUN COLUMNIST | June 20, 2006
No question, William Richkus' portfolio is diversified. His holdings: mutual funds with corporate and municipal bonds, inflation-protected Treasuries, real estate, international stocks and small-, medium- and large-cap equities in growth and value styles. Last month, when the U.S. stock market turned in its worst performance in years, Richkus noticed something across all asset classes: Down. Down. Down. Waaaay down. "Every one of those funds declined, although to differing percentages," he e-mailed.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz | September 11, 2005
Q. I am a single, 32-year-old female and know I should be investing in stocks for my long-term goals, including retirement. I've managed to save $30,000, but I keep it all in the bank because I am afraid to put the money into stocks or mutual funds. How can I overcome this fear? Do you have any suggestions for me? A. From the many letters and e-mails I get, I assure you that your fear is not uncommon. And after the 2000-2002 bear market, a healthy respect for risk is not a bad thing. Your e-mail tells me you understand that if you invest too cautiously you may not accumulate the money you need to meet your goals.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
With its endowment growing in size and complexity, the Johns Hopkins University is turning to a former French professor with a knack for investing in more than just stocks and bonds to manage its portfolio. In hiring Kathryn Crecelius, who handled alternative investing for the last seven years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Hopkins joins a club of schools with the biggest pots of money and lofty ambitions to make more. Hopkins has moved more slowly than some others among the top 25 university endowments in investing in nontraditional areas such as real estate and hedge funds to improve returns.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 1, 2005
ONLY 213 YEARS after the New York Stock Exchange's founding, the government has added regulation requiring many brokers to say this before they take your money: "Our interests may not always be the same as yours." No kidding! Besides enjoying commissions on stock and bond trades whether or not the trades help your portfolio, brokerages often receive what amount to legal kickbacks from sellers of mutual funds, variable annuities and other products. A broker might be tempted to sell you a mediocre fund with a big referral fee instead of a great fund with no fee. No, his interest is not the same as yours.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | April 24, 2005
MORE THAN 60 percent of 401(k) participants don't invest outside their plans, which makes it all the more critical that plans have good investment choices. A recently released survey finds that the majority don't. A review of 680 plans by three finance professors at New York and Fordham universities concluded that 62 percent of plans don't offer adequate diversification. That can make a big difference for workers over 20 years, whose accounts could grow to only one-third the size of nest eggs invested in a broad range of asset classes, the professors found.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 26, 1994
NEW YORK -- In a surprising show of vigor, traders bid up stocks yesterday in response to a sharp drop in interest rates and better-than-expected earnings for companies whose stocks are in the Dow Jones industrial average.The Dow rose 57.10 points, to 3,705.78, and the broader Standard & Poor's 500-stock index rose 5.08 points, to 452.71. The smaller-company Nasdaq composite index rose 8.24 points, to 730.80.Yesterday's stock rally was closely tied to strength in the bond market. The yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury bond dropped to 7.15 percent, down from 7.22 percent Friday.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stock prices surged yesterday in extremely heavy trading after a three-day slump that had decimated many technology stocks. The market was aided by a strong rally in the bond market and powerful first-quarter earnings by IBM and other blue-chip stocks.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 53.83 points, to 3,652.54, and the broader Standard & Poor's 500 rose 6.77 points, to 448.73.But it was the Nasdaq composite index, heavy with battered technology stocks, that rose the most, up 13.22 points, to 718.74.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 13, 2005
The debate over Social Security reform has exposed a little secret among professional money managers: They're not sure what they're doing, either. President Bush proposes that workers be allowed to divert part of their Social Security insurance premiums into private accounts, to be invested in professionally managed stock and bond funds. Workers naturally are wary. Perhaps coincidentally, the pros who would be asked to manage the money are having an anxiety attack as well. Rules of thumb that governed investing for decades are being questioned in the wake of the Nasdaq bubble and the widespread forecast of flat stock and bond markets for the next several years.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 28, 2004
T ROWE PRICE Associates stock is up nearly 10 percent since President Bush's re-election, partly on guesses that the Baltimore company will benefit from proposals to allow workers to invest Social Security money in stock and bond markets. "Windfall for Wall Street" might be the headline for national media, but one could substitute "Pratt" for "Wall" and still capture the sentiment. "T. Rowe Price is going to do spectacularly well" if Congress allows private Social Security accounts, New York money manager Michael Holland told CNBC's Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street after the election.
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