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Stirrup Pants

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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
The mature males we know were dragged kicking and resisting into pleated pants and unconstructed jackets. They whined and scoffed, holding on to their flat-front khakis and narrow blazers for dear life. Most of them were forced to loosen up finally when even conservative retailers turned the fashion corner.Now these same men are getting comfortable with their new look. Even the few uptight holdouts have learned to relax in their weekend baggies. Poor dears. Just when they are beginning to feel cool, stylish and expansive, the fashion world is getting narrow-minded.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
As the storm-battered work force that was non-essential on Monday and Tuesday became essential again yesterday, the slushy streets of Baltimore filled with lumberjacks and snow goddesses in their post-blizzard finest.Suits and boots. Briefcases and jeans. Turtlenecks and wingtips. Stirrup pants and pearls. The city's legions had to return to work, but full corporate regalia was mandatory only for those with the most ceremonial of responsibilities and the warmest of heated garages.The rest of the workaday world resorted to fashion fusion, which kept up corporate appearances but acknowledged the impracticality of pinstriped business as usual.
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By Catherine Cook | April 11, 1991
Some of this spring's best sales have come as surprises."In a season when customers were supposed to be wanting to buy safe because of the economy and everything, we found what they really wanted was something new," says Nancy Chistolini, vice president of creative merchandising at Hecht's. "They didn't want a basic jacket, but one with fancier buttons or braid or trim."And I won't say the unitard was a blowout, but at $48 apiece, they did very well for something that wasn't a necessity. The black stirrup pants really took off, and I wish we had more of them.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewciz | November 15, 1992
It's an age-old fashion dilemma: How does a busy hostess balance the practical demands of holiday entertaining with the desire to look fabulous?The simplest solution? You could have your next holiday soiree catered, but alas, hiring a lot of help isn't very practical in these tough economic times. Or you could throw on a favorite pair of jeans, a sweat shirt and tennis shoes for serving dinner, cocktails and snacks to your nattily attired guests. Practical? Yes. Glamorous? Definitely not.Don't despair.
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By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 12, 1990
Active sportswear has sprinted out of the gym, galloped away from the stables and schussed off the slopes. It's turning up on the runways in New York and Europe.Designers who survive beyond their first collections often credit street styles and real people as their inspiration, often finding fashion ideas in places most people wouldn't even think to look.In recent seasons, Americans' fascination with fitness and comfort convinced U.S. designers to incorporate the basics of active sportswear clothes that look sleek but feel great into their ready-to-wear collections.
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By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | April 18, 1991
Deborah Norville, former co-host of NBC's "Today Show," is an advertisement for maternity chic.Throughout her pregnancy, Ms. Norville wore bright dresses and separates that looked feminine and flattering but professional enough for a serious discussion on the Persian Gulf crisis.Here's the surprise: She didn't wear maternity clothes. She carefully picked styles that accommodated her expanding figure."The wonderful thing is that my timing is perfect for current trends. The swing dress, the little trapeze of the '60s is back in style," said Ms. Norville, who recently gave birth to a boy.One fashion expert agrees.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
EVEN IF you never learned to figure the footage of an area rug, the colorful shapes in this fall's retail racks will convince you that geometry is your strong suit.The brights have been seen for several seasons, but pieced and patched designs in unconventional combinations are a fresh twist.This punch of color is just the shot in the arm -- or shoulder or collar -- fashion needs to brighten the dressing picture in these budget-conscious times."Color is a gift and doesn't need to carry an astronomical price tag," says Aniko Gaal Schott.
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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,N.Y. Times News Service | September 19, 1990
THE DEMISE of big shoulder pads sent many women into a tailspin.After all, shoulder pads are a godsend to anyone whose hips are less than svelte. A little extra width at the top helps to balance a little extra width at the bottom.But fortunately, designers are providing some compensation for the lack of huge padded shoulders. Though clothes aren't quite as wide at the top these days, they're being shown over sleek leg coverings that help to create that same lean line.Slim skirts are paired with matching tights in a rainbow of bright colors and prints.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewciz | November 15, 1992
It's an age-old fashion dilemma: How does a busy hostess balance the practical demands of holiday entertaining with the desire to look fabulous?The simplest solution? You could have your next holiday soiree catered, but alas, hiring a lot of help isn't very practical in these tough economic times. Or you could throw on a favorite pair of jeans, a sweat shirt and tennis shoes for serving dinner, cocktails and snacks to your nattily attired guests. Practical? Yes. Glamorous? Definitely not.Don't despair.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
As the storm-battered work force that was non-essential on Monday and Tuesday became essential again yesterday, the slushy streets of Baltimore filled with lumberjacks and snow goddesses in their post-blizzard finest.Suits and boots. Briefcases and jeans. Turtlenecks and wingtips. Stirrup pants and pearls. The city's legions had to return to work, but full corporate regalia was mandatory only for those with the most ceremonial of responsibilities and the warmest of heated garages.The rest of the workaday world resorted to fashion fusion, which kept up corporate appearances but acknowledged the impracticality of pinstriped business as usual.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
The mature males we know were dragged kicking and resisting into pleated pants and unconstructed jackets. They whined and scoffed, holding on to their flat-front khakis and narrow blazers for dear life. Most of them were forced to loosen up finally when even conservative retailers turned the fashion corner.Now these same men are getting comfortable with their new look. Even the few uptight holdouts have learned to relax in their weekend baggies. Poor dears. Just when they are beginning to feel cool, stylish and expansive, the fashion world is getting narrow-minded.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | December 20, 1991
NEW YORK -- While retailers have given up on Santa creating a miracle deluge of Christmas sales in 1991, the president of May Co. said yesterday that results in the mid-Atlantic states and the Northeast have been a little better than expected."
FEATURES
By PATI LOWELL | November 17, 1991
IT MAY BE THE SEASON FOR sleigh rides and snowball fights, but for most holiday revelers, a quiet evening spent by a cozy fire is far more appealing. this season stores are offering a whole new selection of clothing that's meant to stay home. Just like "comfort food," which conjures up images of home and hearth, "comfort clothes" make us feel warm and safe . . . not too exciting, but definitely inviting.A PASSION FOR PANTSNo. 1 on this holiday season's fashion wish list is pants. After all, when we're sipping hot toddies next to a roaring fire, we are more than likely going to be sitting on the floor.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
EVEN IF you never learned to figure the footage of an area rug, the colorful shapes in this fall's retail racks will convince you that geometry is your strong suit.The brights have been seen for several seasons, but pieced and patched designs in unconventional combinations are a fresh twist.This punch of color is just the shot in the arm -- or shoulder or collar -- fashion needs to brighten the dressing picture in these budget-conscious times."Color is a gift and doesn't need to carry an astronomical price tag," says Aniko Gaal Schott.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | April 18, 1991
Deborah Norville, former co-host of NBC's "Today Show," is an advertisement for maternity chic.Throughout her pregnancy, Ms. Norville wore bright dresses and separates that looked feminine and flattering but professional enough for a serious discussion on the Persian Gulf crisis.Here's the surprise: She didn't wear maternity clothes. She carefully picked styles that accommodated her expanding figure."The wonderful thing is that my timing is perfect for current trends. The swing dress, the little trapeze of the '60s is back in style," said Ms. Norville, who recently gave birth to a boy.One fashion expert agrees.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | April 11, 1991
Some of this spring's best sales have come as surprises."In a season when customers were supposed to be wanting to buy safe because of the economy and everything, we found what they really wanted was something new," says Nancy Chistolini, vice president of creative merchandising at Hecht's. "They didn't want a basic jacket, but one with fancier buttons or braid or trim."And I won't say the unitard was a blowout, but at $48 apiece, they did very well for something that wasn't a necessity. The black stirrup pants really took off, and I wish we had more of them.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | December 20, 1991
NEW YORK -- While retailers have given up on Santa creating a miracle deluge of Christmas sales in 1991, the president of May Co. said yesterday that results in the mid-Atlantic states and the Northeast have been a little better than expected."
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 19, 1990
One of the pleasures of holiday parties is getting all dressed up in your glittery finest.Which also happens to be one of the major drawbacks to holiday parties.All too often, dress-up clothes are the most confining, restrictive, downright uncomfortable garments we own. Despite conventional wisdom, no fashion rule says a certain level of discomfort is required for clothes to qualify as party-appropriate.With the trend toward entertaining smaller, more intimate groups in more casual, at-home settings, dressing down when you dress up can be pretty simple.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 19, 1990
One of the pleasures of holiday parties is getting all dressed up in your glittery finest.Which also happens to be one of the major drawbacks to holiday parties.All too often, dress-up clothes are the most confining, restrictive, downright uncomfortable garments we own. Despite conventional wisdom, no fashion rule says a certain level of discomfort is required for clothes to qualify as party-appropriate.With the trend toward entertaining smaller, more intimate groups in more casual, at-home settings, dressing down when you dress up can be pretty simple.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Fashion Editor | November 15, 1990
YOU COULD GET by with last year's little black dress. Shorten the skirt a little, add a pair of sparkling shoulder-dusting earrings and you could easily get another season's wear out of it.But if you're ready for something new, you'll find a diverse selection of festive fashions this season -- from demure winter pales to flashy fuchsia sequins."
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