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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
Members of Baltimore's Board of Fire Commissioners will receive their final paychecks at the end of this month, after a recent discovery by the city's Finance Department that the members have not been eligible for a city stipend since 1996. A provision authorizing pay for the commissioners was removed from the city's charter when it was revised under Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's administration more than a decade ago. But, apparently, neither the commissioners nor the city department that writes the checks realized it. The board members have continued to receive nominal pay from the city - roughly $3,600 a year for each member and $4,200 for the president.
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NEWS
October 28, 2013
Baltimore City's interim schools chief, Tishsa Edwards, says the $10,000 "retention stipends" being given to seven top system administrators are needed as an incentive to keep the team of her predecessor, Andrés Alonso, intact until June, when a permanent schools CEO is scheduled to be named. But that's a lot of money for staffers who are already quite well paid for their services, and it raises the question of why they should need more to continue doing their jobs. Put another way, what exactly is the public getting for the money it's shelling out to keep a handful of managers at their desks for the next eight months?
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Trying to forestall a protest march by aged survivors of the Holocaust, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert agreed yesterday to rethink a widely criticized plan to give them a monthly stipend of about $20 each. Olmert had announced the plan in response to concerns about poverty among some of the approximately 240,000 Holocaust survivors who live in Israel, but the size of the stipend was considered laughable by an organization of survivors. The organization announced that it would hold a protest march tomorrow, and some planned to wear striped concentration camp uniforms.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Seven senior administrators in the Baltimore City school system are being offered $10,000 each to stay through June to assist with the transition to a new administration — an expense that school officials say is the price of maintaining stability. The "retention stipends" were proposed by interim CEO Tisha Edwards after two key members of former city schools chief Andrés Alonso's administration resigned last month. "In other urban districts, the superintendent leaves and everything is back to ground zero — that has not happened in Baltimore," said Edwards, who signed a contract to serve as interim CEO until June 2014.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1995
MOSCOW -- In the old days, the typical student at Patrice Lumumba University would be a young African, someone who could hope to become his country's first native-born doctor or engineer after graduation. The new graduate would be expected to take communism home with him and preach of its glories. That communist dream is gone, but the university goes on, struggling to survive in free-market style.Patrice Lumumba University -- alma mater of the terrorist "Carlos" and of hundreds of men and women who are government officials throughout the Third World -- now is a cheap and not so choosy institution.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Holy budget cut! Maryland's legislative leaders are all but eliminating future funds for prayer.It is not that they believe the General Assembly doesn't need prayer in these difficult times. It just don't want to pay for it anymore.Sessions of the Senate and House of Delegates have traditionally opened with prayer, usually delivered by a priest, rabbi or minister invited to the State House by a lawmaker representing his or her district.For their trouble, these men and women of the cloth were slipped a $40 stipend.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | March 28, 2007
A bill to require the governor to select Anne Arundel County school board members from a nomination list has cleared a significant hurdle with the House of Delegates' passage of a version that would pay board members an annual stipend of at least $6,000. The Senate passed a similar version last week without mandating a stipend. The House bill passed Monday 136-2, with Republican Dels. Warren E. Miller of Howard County and Tony McConkey of Severna Park casting the minority votes. Both contain the "essential elements of reform," said County Executive John R. Leopold: The governor would not be able to deviate from a nominating commission's selected finalists for board openings, and appointed members would be required to stand for a retention election.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | April 9, 2004
CHICAGO -- Under the best of circumstances, jury duty is about as enjoyable as being trapped in an elevator with a Ronco salesman. You're yanked away from your job or domestic responsibilities, stuck in an airless bunker with lawyers who flunked out of charm school, forced to work with strangers and paid only a minimal stipend -- and all this can go on for weeks or even months. But one 79-year-old New York woman found out what jury duty is like when the circumstances are not the best. A member of the jury in the trial of Tyco International executives L. Dennis Kozlowski and Mark Swartz, she has not only had her name and photo spread around the world, but was ridiculed in New York newspapers for allegedly being stingy, snobbish and paranoid.
NEWS
December 9, 1995
ADVOCATES FOR the poor feel that Gov. Parris Glendening just returned "half a loaf" in restoring part of the controversial cut he made last summer to the Disability Assistance and Loan Program. Indeed, he deserves at least half a loaf's worth of credit.With federal cuts looming and criticism over his own welfare cut still roiling, the governor announced he would rebuild the sum for the program to $18 million from $13 million, as of Jan. 1.For the individual recipient, the increase will mean a monthly rise from $50 to $100 a month.
NEWS
March 17, 2006
Despite repeated promises to halt the practice, the Baltimore Department of Social Services continues to illegally house children needing foster care at the agency's downtown office building, using it as a makeshift shelter even though it has no beds or showers. By now, the department's excuse for housing young charges in the building is well known: There just aren't enough foster homes for the 7,000 city kids who are wards of the state. Last year, about 150 children were housed in the building, sometimes for more than two weeks.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A federal bankruptcy judge approved RG Steel's $767,000 "retention" plan for 21 employees Tuesday over the sharp objections of the United Steelworkers. The payments, approved by Judge Kevin J. Carey in Wilmington, include stipends for health insurance and a bonus equal to three months' salary, if the workers remain through Dec. 31. RG Steel — which owned the Sparrows Point mill in Baltimore County before auctioning it to a redevelopment firm and liquidator this summer — said the move was necessary to wind down its estate.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
Baltimore County school officials told middle and high school principals last week that they must limit the number of leadership positions next year to save $814,000, a move teachers say means schools have again been targeted for cuts. The decision will strip the title and pay from some teachers who act as department chairs and perform certain roles, including helping principals evaluate teachers, making sure books and supplies are evenly distributed, and deciding how curriculum will be taught.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
After months of discussion and planning, the Ulman administration is changing the way Howard County pays for mobile phones and other communication devices used by more than 500 employees, a move expected to save more than $350,000 annually. Instead of the county leasing the phones directly and providing them to employees, workers - including County Executive Ken Ulman - will get a flat monthly stipend, depending on their usage and need. Employees have been divided into four categories or tiers, with stipends ranging from $15 to $105 a month.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | March 30, 2009
As the economy gets grimmer, more families are likely looking into hiring a live-in au pair visiting from another country to cover child care in exchange for room and board and a stipend. I asked Christine Connally, a Maryland-based community counselor for Au Pair in America, to give interested parents some things to think about. Here are her questions and answers: * How many hours a week do I need child care? "An au pair can work up to 45 hours per week and a maximum of 10 hours per day. While this stipulation is set by federal regulations governing the au pair program, it is a ground rule that's also just common sense, as you want your au pair focused and alert during her work hours."
NEWS
December 27, 2008
Fire board stipends were money well spent Annie Linskey's report on the elimination of the stipend long paid to the members of our Board of Fire Commissioners causes me to wonder if this controversy is not a classic example of skewing legislative intent ("Fire board ineligible for stipend," Dec. 22). Before the 1996 charter amendment that relegated the board to an advisory role, the fire commissioners had what amounted to control over the operations of the Fire Department. But it is difficult for me to believe that if it had really been the intent of the charter amendment to eliminate the stipend, the payment would have continued for another month, let alone 12 years.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
Members of Baltimore's Board of Fire Commissioners will receive their final paychecks at the end of this month, after a recent discovery by the city's Finance Department that the members have not been eligible for a city stipend since 1996. A provision authorizing pay for the commissioners was removed from the city's charter when it was revised under Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's administration more than a decade ago. But, apparently, neither the commissioners nor the city department that writes the checks realized it. The board members have continued to receive nominal pay from the city - roughly $3,600 a year for each member and $4,200 for the president.
NEWS
December 7, 2005
The second financial step in the Ehrlich administration's push to stem the eroding numbers of Maryland's foster families - boosting their monthly stipend by $25 per month - adds insult to injury. With the administration currently spending $1 million on a marketing campaign to recruit more families to temporarily house children in desperate need, the roughly $1 million a year to boost monthly payments for the 3,400 families already providing such care is a pittance - particularly after 15 years of no increases.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
MARYLAND schools soon will face a critical teacher shortage: While 2,500 new teachers graduate from state colleges each year, vacancies could be four times that by 2001. A package of incentives to draw more teachers into the classroom ought to be a legislative priority.It was in the House of Delegates, where the Quality Teacher Incentive Act of 1999 passed by a whopping 108-20, with 60 co-sponsors. Will the Senate follow suit in the face of vocal opposition from the state teachers union?Maryland badly needs a basic set of incentives to weather the coming storm.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Trying to forestall a protest march by aged survivors of the Holocaust, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert agreed yesterday to rethink a widely criticized plan to give them a monthly stipend of about $20 each. Olmert had announced the plan in response to concerns about poverty among some of the approximately 240,000 Holocaust survivors who live in Israel, but the size of the stipend was considered laughable by an organization of survivors. The organization announced that it would hold a protest march tomorrow, and some planned to wear striped concentration camp uniforms.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | March 28, 2007
A bill to require the governor to select Anne Arundel County school board members from a nomination list has cleared a significant hurdle with the House of Delegates' passage of a version that would pay board members an annual stipend of at least $6,000. The Senate passed a similar version last week without mandating a stipend. The House bill passed Monday 136-2, with Republican Dels. Warren E. Miller of Howard County and Tony McConkey of Severna Park casting the minority votes. Both contain the "essential elements of reform," said County Executive John R. Leopold: The governor would not be able to deviate from a nominating commission's selected finalists for board openings, and appointed members would be required to stand for a retention election.
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