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Stimulus Package

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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Voter complaints that President Clinton seems more interested in taxing and spending than in cutting the federal budget have prompted the White House and legislative leaders to reconsider acting first on a $16 billion stimulus package.Instead, they will try rush approval of the blueprint for Mr. Clinton's long-term budget cuts and tax increases so they can pair it with the spending package to boost the economy.Leon E. Panetta, Mr. Clinton's director of management and budget, has asked the lawmakers to consider the president's blueprint for deficit reduction over the next four years on an "expedited track" that would bring it up for a final vote before the Easter recess April 2, about the same time as the stimulus package.
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NEWS
September 13, 2012
Former President Bill Clinton told the Democratic National Convention that President Obama has a plan to rescue the economy but that Republicans have stood in his way. From this you might think that the economy requires government intervention to create jobs. But history tells a different story. For the first 150 years of this country's existence, the federal government felt no great need to "do something" when the economy turned down. One of the last "do-nothing" presidents was Warren G. Harding.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | April 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Unable to dent a solid wall of Republican resistance that threatened their plans to recess by the weekend, Senate Democratic leaders started talking seriously yesterday about a compromise that could shrink President Clinton's $16.3 billion economic stimulus package.Majority Leader George J. Mitchell, trying to deal with Republican resolve on the issue, said after a late afternoon caucus of Senate Democrats that the White House is determined to hold out for the full spending package, a key element of Mr. Clinton's economic plan.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Like any construction firm hoping to break into government contracting, Linwood Scott's company needed to obtain a surety bond - a type of insurance - in order to win its first job. But getting the bond, which is required for contracts worth more than $100,000, can be a challenge for small businesses such as Scott's Baltimore-based LCSJ Construction. Underwriters prefer to work with companies that have completed similar jobs or are large enough to sustain major losses if a project falters.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Democrats in Congress are talking about passing another stimulus package shortly after the election. The details are still sketchy. But the cost is expected to range from $150 billion to $300 billion. The money could go to transportation projects, infrastructure, housing, job creation, unemployment insurance, tax cuts and health care for children and seniors. And, yes, more tax rebates. What do you think? Do we need another stimulus package? And if so, where do you think the money should be spent to do the most good for the economy?
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman and Thomas L. Friedman,New York Times News Service | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, confronting a new round of huge layoffs in some leading U.S. industries, said yesterday that the president was likely to propose $15 billion to $20 billion in additional federal spending this year to stimulate job growth.Since the election, President Clinton's economic advisers have been debating how much, if any, new spending and tax credits they should propose to create jobs and how that increased spending should be coupled with longer-term measures to shrink the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | January 24, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Congressional leaders and the Bush administration were close to reaching a deal on a $145 billion economic stimulus package last night as the Treasury Department crunched the numbers on components of the plan, senior House officials said. "We'll have more to say tomorrow morning," said House Minority Leader John A. Boehner. "We're hopeful." Boehner, an Ohio Republican, made his remarks exiting his third extended negotiating session of the day with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, and Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. On her way into an evening meeting, Pelosi said there had been "tremendous" progress during the day. "I'm hopeful," she said.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY and KEN HARNEY,kenharney@earthlink.net | January 25, 2009
Should you give the $7,500 homebuyer tax credit a second look? Now that Congress may be on the verge of transforming it into a true tax credit - one that never has to be paid back - you just might want to do so. On Jan. 15, the House Democratic leadership outlined its $825 billion economic stimulus package, loaded with $275 billion in tax cuts and $550 billion in new spending on health care, education, alternative energy and infrastructure improvements....
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Richard Simon and Noam N. Levey and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Less than a week after quickly crafting a rare bipartisan compromise, the House yesterday overwhelmingly passed a $150 billion economic stimulus package to send checks to millions of low- and middle-income Americans. But what shape the final legislation will take remains unclear as the Senate begins debate on its own plan amid more signs of economic instability. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, will convene a meeting today to consider his version, which differs substantially from the House bill.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 14, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's Cabinet approved a record $116.8-billion in economic pump-priming last night -- a move designed as much to shape relations with the United States as it is to generate a surge in the Japanese economy.At the same time, the government appeared ready to make another uncomfortable gesture to the West -- and especially the United States -- by allocating about $1.8 billion in aid to Russia despite a territorial dispute with Moscow over the Kuril Islands in the North Pacific.The $116.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
Columnist Thomas F. Schaller's analysis is incredibly myopic ("Avoiding Europe's austerity nightmare," April 18). To compare the economic condition of the U.S. to those of Greece or Spain at the beginning of the economic crisis is comparing apples and oranges. The fundamental strength of the American economy was far greater than that of the countries he selects in order to contrast and applaud President Barack Obama's response. In short, America had the ability to absorb additional debt - for a time.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
So "Re-electing President Obama in 2012 would be a disaster for America"? (Readers respond, June 10.) Yeah right, and Osama bin Laden's death was a great tragedy to freedom lovers everywhere. The only looming disaster in 2012 is the possibility (getting slimmer every day, thankfully) that the craven Republicans and their phony-populist, corporate backed and directed "tea party" fanatics can hang on to power and not be sent back under the rock they crawled out from. Fortunately, America is beginning to see through their lies and obfuscations.
NEWS
By Michele McNeil, Hechinger/EWA | February 17, 2011
In the two years since Congress made the federal government's largest one-time investment in public schools, change has rippled through classrooms from coast to coast. Tennessee and Delaware have revamped their laws to promote the growth of charter schools. Massachusetts and Maryland have launched efforts to tie teacher evaluations to student performance. Reflecting similar moves elsewhere, a persistently failing high school in Oregon is investing a record amount in additional training for teachers.
NEWS
By Andy Harris | January 17, 2011
Last November, the American people sent a clear message to Washington: Government cannot solve all of our problems, and in order to get the economy moving again we must head in a new direction. I am humbled that the citizens of the 1st Congressional District overwhelmingly selected me to join 95 other new members on Capitol Hill to right the ship on jobs, to fix the deficit and to hold President Barack Obama accountable on the expansion of government. On our very first day, we adopted new House rules for the 112th Congress.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
President Barack Obama will announce details of a new $33 billion payroll tax credit for businesses during a visit to Baltimore this morning, White House officials said Thursday. The proposal, which Obama mentioned in his State of the Union speech Wednesday night, is an updated version of an initiative that was first considered as a part of the 2009 stimulus package and later abandoned. A senior White House official, briefing reporters on condition he not be identified by name because Obama had not yet made the details public, said the time was ripe for the idea.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
President Barack Obama will announce details of a new $33 billion payroll tax credit for businesses during a visit to Baltimore this morning, White House officials said Thursday. The proposal, which Obama mentioned in his State of the Union speech Wednesday night, is an updated version of a similar initiative that was first considered as a part of the 2009 stimulus package and later abandoned. A senior White House official, briefing reporters on condition he not be identified by name because Obama had not yet made the details public, said the time was ripe for the idea.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Jim Puzzanghera and Janet Hook and Jim Puzzanghera,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 16, 2009
WASHINGTON - Launching an initiative that could be the cornerstone of Barack Obama's presidency, House Democrats unveiled yesterday an $825 billion spending and tax-cut plan to shore up the crippled economy he inherits on Inauguration Day. The bill, which Democratic leaders hope to enact by mid-February, includes $550 billion for spending on infrastructure, science, energy and education programs over two years, and $275 billion for tax cuts for individuals...
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | February 11, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to implore the state's congressional delegation today to craft a federal stimulus package with more money for states. The governor travels to Washington the day after the Senate approved a two-year stimulus bill that would direct $3.3 billion to Maryland, which is $953 million less than the House version. According to documents reviewed by state lawmakers, the Senate plan doesn't include money for school construction, low-income heating assistance or pandemic flu preparation.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2010
The Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Thursday it is seeking a short-term advance of about $250 million from the federal government so the state agency can continue paying unemployment benefits. The money will be used to pay benefits beginning next month and until April when employers send in their unemployment insurance tax payments to the state. Reserves in the Maryland Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund have dropped from $755 million at the end of 2008 to less than $100 million.
NEWS
July 10, 2009
Governors like Maryland's Martin O'Malley and Pennsylvania's Edward G. Rendell may be open to a second stimulus bill - as governors are seldom opposed to accepting federal largesse of most any kind - but that doesn't make it sound economic policy. To even be discussing such a plan when perhaps 10 percent of the $787 billion stimulus package approved in February has actually been spent is extraordinary even by the standards of Washington and the drunken-sailor crowd on Capitol Hill. But talk of another round of aid has intensified as economists ponder the latest unemployment figures.
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