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NEWS
August 10, 2013
Tom Schaller in his column "GOP just can't say yes to President Obama" (Aug 7) is correct in describing the president's stimulus program as a resounding success that revived the economy after the disastrous Bush recession and avoided the nation falling into a full blown depression. As a past vice chairman of the American Road and Transportation Builders Association, I clearly recall how the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 kept the highway construction industry, including contractors, engineers, equipment manufacturers and suppliers, afloat and in business for quite a number of years, and avoided laying off millions of workers.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Construction is expected to begin this spring on a commuter parking garage for Howard County's first transit oriented development, a project planned to eventually include apartments, stores, offices and a hotel. County Executive Ken Ulman has approved a financing arrangement to pay for the $17 million job, a four-story, 704-space garage to be built next to the MARC Savage Station by the Somerset Construction company of Bethesda, and operated by the Maryland Department of Transportation.
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NEWS
July 23, 2010
After reading the story "Stimulus-money jobs are a win-win for state" (July 19). I could only shake my head. The Baltimore Sun is gaga over 100 jobs created by the state using $3.6 million dollars of stimulus money. What The Sun doesn't get (and it doesn't surprise me) is, who will pay for the jobs when the stimulus money runs out? Gee! A good journalist might have thought to ask a simple question like that. But with state workers being furloughed every year, I guess we'll soon hear from the state employees' unions.
NEWS
August 10, 2013
Tom Schaller in his column "GOP just can't say yes to President Obama" (Aug 7) is correct in describing the president's stimulus program as a resounding success that revived the economy after the disastrous Bush recession and avoided the nation falling into a full blown depression. As a past vice chairman of the American Road and Transportation Builders Association, I clearly recall how the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 kept the highway construction industry, including contractors, engineers, equipment manufacturers and suppliers, afloat and in business for quite a number of years, and avoided laying off millions of workers.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
In your editorial on the Republican reaction to President Obama's jobs plan ("Let them eat tax cuts," Sept. 12), why give a snide remark about House Speaker John Boehner playing golf? Mr Obama has played more in the last two and a half years than I have, and I am retired and my kids are out of house. I couldn't afford the time to play golf when my kids were his age - not the money but the time investment. He must be either cutting us or his kids short (and seems to be us). His jobs bill (aka stimulus 2)
NEWS
February 1, 2010
According to your Sunday edition, some business leaders in Baltimore are critical of the Obama administration's stimulus program, arguing that it has not created jobs or helped buoy up the economy ("Business tax-rate impasse emerges," Jan. 31). Most economists from all persuasions agree that without the stimulus we would have unemployment of 14 percent rather than 10 percent and that we would now be struggling with a depression rather than a recovering recession. I hope that these business leader colleagues of mine who are critical of the stimulus are more clear headed running their businesses than they are making political pronouncements.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
President Barack Obama's call for spending an additional $50 billion on transportation was quickly dismissed by Republicans as more of the same old economic stimulus. They could not be more wrong. If there was a valid criticism to be made of the first stimulus package, it was that not enough was invested in the nation's infrastructure needs. What Mr. Obama is proposing is not some wild-eyed liberal spending scheme but the kind of basic investment that Washington should be making whether today's unemployment is 9.8 percent or 2.8 percent.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | February 5, 2002
CHICAGO - The story is told of a prosperous obstetrician who is having lunch with some colleagues when he looks at his watch and abruptly announces that he has to get to the hospital for a delivery. "Is it a Caesarean?" asks one of his friends. He replies, with a smile, "Only if I get there in time." Physicians occasionally like to pretend that their services are needed when they really aren't, and politicians are no different. The president and Congress are urging the swift passage of a fiscal stimulus bill to assist the economy, each accusing the other of risky methods and unconscionable stalling.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2009
Up to 40 commercial buildings in five sections of Baltimore will receive facade improvements under an $800,000 revitalization program funded as part of the federal government's stimulus efforts and administered by the Baltimore Development Corp. The development agency announced this week that it is seeking proposals from architects to oversee facade renovations of privately owned buildings in Belair-Edison, Oldtown, Pigtown, West Baltimore Street and the Pennsylvania Avenue corridor. The money was awarded to Baltimore as part of the federal government's efforts to create jobs to help stimulate the economy through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Feb. 1 is the deadline for architects' proposals to BDC. Donna Langley, director of the Baltimore Main Streets Program, said she expects the facade improvement work to begin by spring.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
The developer of a Wegmans Food Markets in Abingdon has received a $7 million federal stimulus bond loan to be used towards construction. The Harford County Council voted to approve the loan for Box Hill FC, LLC earlier this week. The 144,000-square-foot Wegmans will be the anchor of a retail and office center planned for the intersection of Box Hill Corporate Drive and Woodsdale Road near I-95 in Harford County. It is slated to open next year, with construction to begin this month.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 6, 2013
I generally avoid trite devices like multiple-choice questions to frame a column. But I can't help myself this time, so please bear with me. Congressional Republicans rejected President Barack Obama's proposal last week to exchange a cut in corporate tax rates for an infrastructure-based jobs stimulus plan for which of the following reasons: (a) They know U.S. corporate tax rates aren't nearly as punitive for corporate America as they claim them to be; (b) They realize the 2009 stimulus worked and don't want to risk doing anything that might further improve the economy between now and the 2014 midterm elections; (c)
NEWS
By Andy Harris | June 17, 2013
President Harry S. Truman's famous adage - "The buck stops here" - sat on his desk in the Oval Office as a clear reminder that as president, he was responsible for the decisions he made and what happened in his administration. It sent a message that accountability would be an ethic of his presidency. From the scandals embroiling Washington, like the IRS targeting individuals based on their political beliefs, to the wasted stimulus dollars in Maryland that were supposed to help needy children, the days of "The buck stops here" are long gone.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
The Maryland State Department of Education may have to pay back up to $540,000 in federal money intended to help the state's poorest schools after a scathing audit found that Baltimore City was one of two school districts that misspent the funds, using the money for dinner cruises, makeovers and meals. The report, reviewing grant expenses from 2009 and 2010, was conducted by the Office of the Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Education. It found similar misspending in Prince George's County schools.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 20, 2013
There is an old but rejuvenated movement in the country these days. It's a far-left take on Keynesian economics: a school of thought intent on raising taxes and expanding the public sector - as a way to jump-start the economy. Yes, you read that correctly. The progressive intelligentsia (with a recent assist by the Congressional Research Service) are all hot and excited by the prospect of higher taxes on upper-income taxpayers, the better to spur economic growth. The model is supposed to be the Clinton era, wherein income tax hikes coincided with strong economic growth, a surging stock market, and three consecutive years of a federal balanced budget.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Here we go again. Under the third round of the Federal Reserve's "quantitative easing" program, the bank will spend $40 billion more a month for 12 months ("Markets rally on new Fed stimulus," Sept. 14). Together with the $45 billion already committed to the end of this year that totals $85 billion through December. The stated reason is to stimulate housing. But housing prices need to find their equilibrium through supply and demand, not through Fed funny money. That is how we got into trouble in the first place.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Former President Bill Clinton told the Democratic National Convention that President Obama has a plan to rescue the economy but that Republicans have stood in his way. From this you might think that the economy requires government intervention to create jobs. But history tells a different story. For the first 150 years of this country's existence, the federal government felt no great need to "do something" when the economy turned down. One of the last "do-nothing" presidents was Warren G. Harding.
NEWS
September 20, 2011
Before half as much money as the original stimulus package is voted on in Congress, we need to learn what of the first stimulus money has been spent or committed, and how much is still available. It would seem likely that funds have already been committed to many of those "shovel-ready" projects that President Barack Obama wants to get more money for now. Are there still so many more of those first projects still not committed to being fixed? Let's find out if the first stimulus round has or hasn't done its job before committing more money.
NEWS
July 20, 2010
Tira Jones has simply gone from one form of welfare to another ("Stimulus-money jobs are a win-win for state; Ex-welfare recipients now get paycheck as they shrink backlog of assistance claims," July 19). Printing money or taking it from working taxpayers in order to give it to individuals like Ms. Jones may do something for her self-esteem, but it doesn't do anything to move the economy forward. It simply further bloats an already excessive public sector that "regulates," "reallocates," "analyzes," and "consults" rather than working and paying and producing and creating.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 10, 2012
The economy added 96,000 jobs in August, down from 141,000 in July and not nearly enough to keep pace with population growth. The unemployment rate fell to 8.1 percent only because 581,000 workers quit looking for work and are no longer counted in the tally. In the weakest recovery since the Great Depression, the entire reduction in unemployment from its 10 percent peak in October 2009 has been accomplished through a significant drop in the percentage of adults participating in the labor force - either working or looking for work.
NEWS
By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Developer James W. Rousewas a pioneer at recycling other people's buildings for new uses, including Faneuil Hall in Boston and parts of the South Street Seaport historic district in Manhattan. Now one of the most prominent buildings he constructed from scratch - the former Rouse Co. headquarters in Columbia - is about to get a similar treatment from a successor to Rouse's firm. The Howard Hughes Corp. of Dallas, which succeeded Rouse and General Growth Properties as the master developer of Columbia, has a $20 million plan to convert the former Rouse headquarters on Little Patuxent Parkway from a single-occupant office building to a mixed-use, multitenant development with a 41,000 square-foot Whole Foods Market as the anchor.
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