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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | January 28, 1994
Capital gains tax reduction proposedANNAPOLIS -- The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee will hear testimony at 1 p.m. today on a bill sponsored by Sen. Larry E. Haines, R-Carroll-District 5, on lowering the state's capital gains tax.Mr. Haines, a Westminster Realtor, is sponsoring Senate Bill 204, which would reduce the amount of capital gains taxed under Maryland law.Currently, 100 percent of the profit from an investment is taxed. Only 50 percent would be taxed under the senator's proposal.
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NEWS
January 24, 2013
Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the rallying cry from our elected leaders, both locally and nationally, for the need for more restrictive gun control (smaller magazine clips, banning certain "assault" weapons, etc.). The liberal left seems to hold the patent on exploiting current events to further their political agenda, and they're following the playbook step by step to further erode our right to bear arms, guaranteed to us in the Second Amendment. Some of the pro-gun control letters published in The Sun question why any hunter would need a so called "assault weapon" to go hunting, or they claim that our forefathers only intended the amendment to be about muskets and single shot rifles, because that's what was around back then.
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NEWS
November 4, 1991
The greatest idea we've heard from a politician in a long time is Gov. William Donald Schaefer's order to his state minions to get on the stick with capital projects in order to create jobs, stimulate the economy and rebuild the state's infrastructure.The problem is, a governor can do only so much along that line. What's needed is for President Bush and Congress to push Schaefer's idea on a national scale.Why not dust off and redeem the old New Deal idea of the Works Progress Administration?
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | May 23, 2011
April housing starts were down 10 percent from March, the Commerce Department tells us, hitting the lowest level since the 1940s. What is disturbing is the dire tone that accompanies this information — the oh-my-oh-my attitude of the business sector that is passed on compliantly by the news media. New housing starts are falling for at least three good reasons, all brought to us courtesy of the despairing housing industry itself: •There too many houses on the market because builders have over-built.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
Six months ago, American politicians took great delight in bashing Japan. They said Japan's unfair trading practices were responsible for many of America's economic ills. The litany of offenses ranged from dumping automobiles in the United States to closing its markets to American construction companies.In recent weeks, however, the political campaigns have been free of this rhetorical pummeling, thanks to Japan's economic woes. Plummeting land values and share prices on the Tokyo stock market have taken their toll on the economic superpower.
NEWS
March 10, 2001
NO HELP can be expected from Japan for reversing the U.S. economic slowdown. The once-feared Japan has been economically down for a decade and seems to be sinking back into recession. That means the economies of Indonesia and other Southeast Asian tiger cubs, struggling to recover from their meltdown of three years ago, can hardly expect soon the level of Japanese investment to which they were previously accustomed. It was Japan's finance minister, Kiichi Miyazawa, who created a sense of panic last Thursday by saying the nation's finances were "very near collapsing."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Congressional leaders are predicting that they will kick out of the starting blocks when they return to work today, trying to overcome election-year partisanship to act quickly on a number of measures intended to stimulate the economy -- from a tax cut for the middle class to an extension of unemployment benefits for the jobless.The political discord of presidential election years usually shackles congressional action, but leaders say this year could be different -- at least on tax policy -- because the recession demands efforts to stimulate the economy.
NEWS
By Gar Alperovitz | December 17, 1992
AS Bill Clinton devoured economic advice at his two-da "summit" meeting, a sobering concern arose: Just how much do new policies really matter?Has federal economic policy ever had a major impact on 20th-century U.S. economic experience?Our economy has rarely achieved sustained high employment except in wartime or in unusual postwar conditions.Early in the century we were in trouble until World War I bailed us LTC out. The postwar years faded into the mixed bag of the 1920s, which collapsed into the Depression until (after a brief New Deal upswing faltered)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The dollar soared to its highest level against the yen in nearly five months yesterday after the United States and Japan sold about $1 billion of yen and the Japanese government moved to make it easier for institutions there to invest their yen abroad.With world markets flooded with yen, the dollar rose 3.3 percent against the Japanese currency, standing at 90.96 yen in late New York trading, up from 88.04 yen on Tuesday. In early trading in Tokyo today, the dollar was at 91.10 yen.Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin said the moves by both nations were consistent with an agreement made by the Group of Seven leading industrial nations on April 25, which called for an "orderly reversal" of the plunge in the dollar that occurred in the winter.
NEWS
By CAROL COX WAIT | February 1, 1993
Howard Baker called it a riverboat gamble. We wanted to believe we could have higher government spending and lower taxes, and that economic growth would make it all come out right. But it didn't work.We have been living on borrowed money for over a decade. The national debt is growing faster than the economy. If that trend continues, it ultimately will take 100 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (our total economic output) just to pay interest on the national debt.That is obviously an absurdity.
NEWS
By Edward Goldberg | April 5, 2004
NEW YORK - Every kid who has ever traded a baseball card knows that trade is good thing. Of course, in the grown-up world, baseball is like free trade: It's neither free nor necessarily fair. The New York Yankees invest more in their team than Tampa Bay and consequently most kids (the ones who are often the true judge of value in baseball) would prefer a Derek Jeter card to that of the current Devil Rays shortstop. To try to give the sport a more level playing field, major-league baseball has developed a plan in which the teams that invest the most in players pay a so-called luxury tax to the teams that invest less.
NEWS
By William D. Ferguson | May 15, 2003
AFTER THE Senate sliced President Bush's $726 billion tax cut to $350 billion, the administration responded with a $550 billion (minimum), which the House passed. The Senate is still debating the issue. To justify this still-enormous figure, the administration has made two equally specious arguments. It claims that large tax cuts will stimulate the economy and create jobs, relieving the current economic doldrums. But to stimulate the economy within a year or two, a tax cut needs to focus on people who will spend it - the poor and middle class - not on the rich, as this proposal does.
NEWS
March 10, 2001
NO HELP can be expected from Japan for reversing the U.S. economic slowdown. The once-feared Japan has been economically down for a decade and seems to be sinking back into recession. That means the economies of Indonesia and other Southeast Asian tiger cubs, struggling to recover from their meltdown of three years ago, can hardly expect soon the level of Japanese investment to which they were previously accustomed. It was Japan's finance minister, Kiichi Miyazawa, who created a sense of panic last Thursday by saying the nation's finances were "very near collapsing."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The dollar soared to its highest level against the yen in nearly five months yesterday after the United States and Japan sold about $1 billion of yen and the Japanese government moved to make it easier for institutions there to invest their yen abroad.With world markets flooded with yen, the dollar rose 3.3 percent against the Japanese currency, standing at 90.96 yen in late New York trading, up from 88.04 yen on Tuesday. In early trading in Tokyo today, the dollar was at 91.10 yen.Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin said the moves by both nations were consistent with an agreement made by the Group of Seven leading industrial nations on April 25, which called for an "orderly reversal" of the plunge in the dollar that occurred in the winter.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | January 28, 1994
Capital gains tax reduction proposedANNAPOLIS -- The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee will hear testimony at 1 p.m. today on a bill sponsored by Sen. Larry E. Haines, R-Carroll-District 5, on lowering the state's capital gains tax.Mr. Haines, a Westminster Realtor, is sponsoring Senate Bill 204, which would reduce the amount of capital gains taxed under Maryland law.Currently, 100 percent of the profit from an investment is taxed. Only 50 percent would be taxed under the senator's proposal.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 6, 1993
NEW YORK -- While the U.S. economy is leaving behind three years of painful restructuring and is poised for solid growth, its progress next year could be overshadowed by its trading partners' economic travails, economists said yesterday.While growth in the United States should stabilize at a respectable 3 percent next year, economists said, Europe will be bogged down in recession, and growth in Japan will be fortunate to reach a meager 1 percent. Speaking at the Conference Board's 1994 Business and Financial Outlook, the economists offered a subdued prognosis for the coming year.
NEWS
February 11, 1991
Looking at Gov. William Donald Schaefer's $1.8 billion capital budget for next year, it is hard to believe that Maryland is in the midst of a substantial recession. The total set aside for construction is only slightly less than 1991, and that's because of severe problems in the Transportation Department and the need to reduce pay-as-you-go projects. Maryland continues to issue a hefty amount of bonds to put up new government buildings and support economic development initiatives.Over the past five years, construction spending, excluding transportation, has risen nearly 200 percent.
NEWS
By Edward Goldberg | April 5, 2004
NEW YORK - Every kid who has ever traded a baseball card knows that trade is good thing. Of course, in the grown-up world, baseball is like free trade: It's neither free nor necessarily fair. The New York Yankees invest more in their team than Tampa Bay and consequently most kids (the ones who are often the true judge of value in baseball) would prefer a Derek Jeter card to that of the current Devil Rays shortstop. To try to give the sport a more level playing field, major-league baseball has developed a plan in which the teams that invest the most in players pay a so-called luxury tax to the teams that invest less.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | August 15, 1993
Tokyo -- After four decades of the best governmental relations money could buy, the stewards of Japan Inc. are finding it hard to adjust to Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's wildly popular -- new coalition government.And the stakes in this year of political turmoil couldn't be higher for the recession-weary companies that power the world's second-largest economy.What, executives wonder, will the reformist coalition mean to economic prospects -- and to the cozy business-government partnership cited as the key to Japan's postwar revival?
NEWS
By CAROL COX WAIT | February 1, 1993
Howard Baker called it a riverboat gamble. We wanted to believe we could have higher government spending and lower taxes, and that economic growth would make it all come out right. But it didn't work.We have been living on borrowed money for over a decade. The national debt is growing faster than the economy. If that trend continues, it ultimately will take 100 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (our total economic output) just to pay interest on the national debt.That is obviously an absurdity.
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