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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Momentum continues to build in a wide-ranging effort to restrict the use of weight-loss supplements containing the herbal stimulant that may have contributed to the death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Baseball commissioner Bud Selig released a statement yesterday calling for talks with the Major League Baseball Players Association aimed at placing ephedrine and other potentially dangerous - but legal - supplements on Major League Baseball's list of banned substances.
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NEWS
January 24, 2013
Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the rallying cry from our elected leaders, both locally and nationally, for the need for more restrictive gun control (smaller magazine clips, banning certain "assault" weapons, etc.). The liberal left seems to hold the patent on exploiting current events to further their political agenda, and they're following the playbook step by step to further erode our right to bear arms, guaranteed to us in the Second Amendment. Some of the pro-gun control letters published in The Sun question why any hunter would need a so called "assault weapon" to go hunting, or they claim that our forefathers only intended the amendment to be about muskets and single shot rifles, because that's what was around back then.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 16, 1994
People love home remedies for everything from bee stings to colds or tummy aches. But nothing has captured our readers' imaginations like the raisin remedy for arthritis.Several months ago, we received a note attached to a clipping that described soaking golden raisins in gin, letting the gin evaporate, and then eating nine a day to combat arthritis pain and stiffness. The reader who sent it said his wife had been given the recipe by a neighbor.Well, we'd never heard of this remedy before and we thought it sounded a little strange.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Maryland small businesses gripe that they can't get loans from banks. Lenders complain of a dearth of borrowers. Is there any way to get these two together? The state is going to try, under legislation expected to be signed into law today. Maryland will use a carrot — or, rather, up to $50 million in deposits — to encourage banks here to lend to small businesses. Basically, participating banks that make loans to small businesses will receive an equal amount of deposits from the state.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1991
HAVANA -- Canadian Olympic Association officials reacted angrily yesterday to the announcement that a shot putter from Calgary, Georgette Reed, tested positive at the Pan American Games for a banned stimulant in her multivitamin tablets.According to a statement released by Diana Duerkop, the head of the Canadian delegation, the COA was informed last Friday of the positive result but was assured that the information would not be made public because the Pan American Sports Organization's medical commission ruled that the use of the stimulant was inadvertent.
HEALTH
By Paul Lavin, Ph.D | September 11, 1990
The article entitled "Scientologists triggered Ritalin debate" (8-7-90) contends that the Church of Scientology almost singlehandedly stimulated the Ritalin issue to discredit psychiatry. In fact, there are many professional groups and individual doctors who have been concerned about the over- use of Ritalin long before the Church of Sci-entology entered this debate.For instance, the American Academy of Pediatrics investigated the wide-spread use of Ritalin in the early 1970s. At that time, many respected clinicians charged stimulant medication was being prescribed indiscriminately and stimulants were being used without real justification for prolonged periods of time without adequate supervision.
SPORTS
January 31, 1998
Snowfall: No new snow in Nagano City or on men's downhill course. That left 6.7 inches in Nagano City, and 6 feet, 6 1/2 inches on the downhill course.Update: A haircut salon has opened in the International Zone of ** the Olympic Village, where 100 barbers and beauticians who volunteered to run the salon will take turns serving athletes and officials during the games.Going for the gold: Michael Dionne, a push-athlete on the U.S. bobsledding team, was barred from the Games after testing positive for the banned stimulant ephedrine in November, the international bobsled federation said.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | February 23, 2003
TAMPA, Fla. - The heart palpitations started on a Sunday night in March 1996 as David Wells sat in his hotel room after a day of spring training workouts with the Orioles. When Wells arrived at Fort Lauderdale Stadium for work the next morning, his heart was still speeding. By that afternoon, Wells was admitted to Holy Cross Hospital, intravenous tubes in his arms, his heart pounding and his mind racing. At one point, doctors measured his heartbeat at nearly 200 beats per minute. Wells had an irregular heartbeat, the doctors told him, and they recommended stopping his heart, then starting it again by shocking it with a defibrillator.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2004
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Marion Jones is in. Regina Jacobs is out. Torri Edwards may be out, too. You may need more than a program to determine the lineup of the 2004 USA women's Olympic track and field team. A legal defense team would be helpful, too. Four days after failing to make the team in the 100-meter dash, three-time 2000 gold medalist Jones earned a ticket to Athens by winning the long jump at the U.S. Olympic trials yesterday at Sacramento State with a leap of 23 feet, 4 inches.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2003
Water bottles have become ubiquitous among hydration-conscious Americans. But keeping your beverage of choice close at hand is an old custom in many parts of South America, where mate (pronounced MA-ti) reigns as the national drink and serves as far more than a thirst quencher. Travel through Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and other areas where this herbal elixir is sipped, and you're likely to see locals carrying a pouch of tea, a thermos of water and a small, well-used gourd with a wooden or metal straw.
SPORTS
The Washington Post | December 26, 2011
As the Washington Capitals stepped onto the ice in Buffalo on Monday evening, they did so with a much-too-familiar vacancy on their defense. The game against the Sabres was the 20th consecutive and 26th of the season without Mike Green in the lineup. Over the past two seasons, Green's absence from the lineup has become a new normal for Washington and a trying time for the two-time Norris Trophy finalist as the best player at the position. Dating to Feb. 8, Green has missed 52 of the past 62 regular-season contests because of injury.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore and the Bahamas' Freeport have a lot in common. They're both cities with a mix of tourist areas and heavy industry, and both often play second banana to a national capital. Now the two cities are linked by a direct air service that began Thursday. Vision Airlines, a U.S. carrier known for its occasional role as a charter contractor for the Central Intelligence Agency, will offer twice-weekly service between Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and Freeport, a vacation destination that in recent years has been eclipsed by bustling Nassau.
NEWS
By Anirban Basu | August 23, 2011
It is time to bring the dollars home. One of the most discussed aspects of economic life in America is the amount of capital on U.S. corporate balance sheets. But according to research by Moody's, as much as half of U.S. companies' $1.24 trillion in cash balances is in the form of overseas earnings (between $500 billion and $700 billion). Much of this money is trapped, due to America's onerous 35 percent corporate tax rate. But this money wants to come home - and we need it to. While the 2007-09 recession was dreadful, at least America was positioned to respond.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
On July 8th, the government reported that the country added only 18,000 new jobs in June, further confirming that businesses are not hiring. Commentators and many government officials act mystified by these disappointing results, but as someone who works with and invests in small companies, it is not hard for me to understand what is going on. Our government policies discourage private sector job growth. Instead of reducing the costs and red tape incurred by businesses to hire new domestic employees, we have added a major new cost by mandating that businesses provide health care benefits or face federal penalties.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock | June 26, 2011
Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve voted to stand pat last week, ending the most shocking escalation of monetary firepower the country has ever seen. Reality kept the Fed chairman from landing on an aircraft carrier and declaring mission accomplished. The Fed's goals include "maximum employment. " Nobody considers 14 million jobless Americans — 9 percent of the workforce — maximum employment. In any case it's too early to analyze what Ben hath wrought, for better or worse.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
Maryland health authorities have launched an investigation that could lead to a statewide ban on the sale or possession of synthetic stimulant drugs being marketed as "bath salts. " The probe is expected to last a month, followed by a decision on whether to add them to the state's list of "Schedule 1" controlled dangerous substances. In the meantime, "Marylanders should avoid these 'bath salts' products," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
SPORTS
October 1, 2000
Gymnast shouldn't lose gold medal due to sniffles Now it can be told: I'm a drug user! Last winter, I stopped into my local drugstore for some over-the-counter cold relief. After a couple of sleepless nights, I had a hunch the medicine might be to blame. A quick check of the ingredients revealed that the caplets contained a large dose of pseudo-ephedrine - the very drug that just cost Romanian gymnast Andreea Raducan a gold medal in the latest Olympic "doping" scandal. I was concerned.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee rejected a fast-track version of President Bush's budget yesterday but kept the nation guessing on details of the Democratic plan for jump-starting the economy.At a rancorous committee meeting, Democrats and Republicans accused each other of turning the economic debate into a political battleground and of threatening a budget-busting bidding war over tax cuts.Both sides paid lip service to the widespread unemployment, insecurity and hardship in the nation, but neither showed any signs of compromising on how to respond.
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | May 23, 2011
April housing starts were down 10 percent from March, the Commerce Department tells us, hitting the lowest level since the 1940s. What is disturbing is the dire tone that accompanies this information — the oh-my-oh-my attitude of the business sector that is passed on compliantly by the news media. New housing starts are falling for at least three good reasons, all brought to us courtesy of the despairing housing industry itself: •There too many houses on the market because builders have over-built.
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