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By Universal Press Syndicate | September 7, 1994
The flavors of the potatoes, cabbage and stewed tomatoes are as rustic as the presentation of Stewed Tomatoes with Potato Peasant Purses. The purses can be made in advance, then warmed just before serving. A sprinkling of grated Cheddar cheese on top is a perfect complement to this dish. These purses go nicely with grilled English-style sausages (from "Tomatoes: A Country Garden Cookbook" by Jesse Cool, Collins Publishers, $19.95)Stewed TomatoesServes 31 medium yellow onion1 small red or yellow bell pepper1 stalk celery2 tablespoons canola oil3 pounds ripe tomatoes, coarsely chopped5 to 7 sprigs fresh parsley1/4 to 1/2 cup light brown sugarjuice of 1 to 2 lemons1 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperPEASANT PURSES6 large cabbage leaves, preferably savoy1 medium yellow onion finely chopped2 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter ( 1/3 cup)
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | September 13, 2006
Lenore Greenway of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a long-lost recipe for an eggplant casserole, made with eggplant, tomatoes, onions and crackers as well as some other ingredients. Mitzi Hines of Laurinburg, N.C., sent in a recipe for a casserole that sounds very much like what Greenway was looking for. She says it is from a cookbook from the 1950s. The eggplant is boiled and sauteed with onion and garlic; then stewed tomatoes are added to make something that resembles a ratatouille.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 5, 1998
Responses to requests for Frog Eye Salad and stewed tomatoes have been received and tested. You are in for a treat.Frog Eye Salad was the request of Debbie Trimp of Sioux Falls, S.D. She wanted a version of this quick and simple noodle dish that didn't use eggs. Her response came from Trina Herll of Brandon, S.D.Ann Bailey of Pasadena wanted stewed tomatoes, and Mary W. Earl of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "came from Ms. Brown's cookbook at the Hilltop House in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. I have made these for the last 40 to 50 years.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 20, 2006
I never gave much of a thought as to why we had stewed tomatoes on the dinner table a couple of nights a week. It was just a part of Baltimore. And not only at my family's house on Guilford Avenue. They were regularly served at the Maryland Club. And only a few weeks ago, I enjoyed some of the best at a luncheon preceding the Grand National steeplechase race. Stewed tomatoes? Basic food, terribly out of style today, but so evocative of the cuisine that has been vanishing from Maryland since the chefs all got their culinary arts degrees.
FEATURES
October 2, 1991
Satisfy hungry appetites with delicious harvest barley pilaf. Pearl barley is available in the rice and noodle aisle of most grocery stores. Add spicy sausage to create a hearty main dish )) meal.F: This recipe is from the National Barley Foods Council.Harvest Barley Pilaf1 cup pearl barley3 tablespoons butter or margarine1/2 cup each chopped onion and celery1 clove garlic, minced1/2 cup diced green pepper1 16-ounce can stewed tomatoes2 cups water1/2 teaspoon thyme1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepper1/2 pound chorizo or spicy sausage, sauteed and slicedIn large saucepan, saute barley, onion, celery, garlic and pepper in butter over medium heat, until barley is lightly browned.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 20, 2006
I never gave much of a thought as to why we had stewed tomatoes on the dinner table a couple of nights a week. It was just a part of Baltimore. And not only at my family's house on Guilford Avenue. They were regularly served at the Maryland Club. And only a few weeks ago, I enjoyed some of the best at a luncheon preceding the Grand National steeplechase race. Stewed tomatoes? Basic food, terribly out of style today, but so evocative of the cuisine that has been vanishing from Maryland since the chefs all got their culinary arts degrees.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | January 30, 1991
Take a look at this low-fat magic! One pound of meat stretches to satisfy eight hungry diners when you mix it with hearty lentils and lots of vegetables. Because lentils contain almost no fat, they keep the fat content of the stew at a low seven grams per serving while providing lots of protein, B vitamins and iron. This recipe makes plenty, so you may want to freeze half for another time.Beef Stew with Lentils1 pound boneless beef chuck steak, trimmed of fatNon-stick spray coating7 cups beef broth1 cup chopped onion1 cup sliced celery1 cup sliced carrot1 1/2 cups lentils, rinsed and drained1 14 1/2 -ounce can stewed tomatoes1 bay leaf1 9-ounce package frozen Italian-style green beansCut meat into one-half-inch pieces.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
Alice G. Harrison, matriarch of Harrison's Chesapeake House, a Tilghman Island eating and lodging establishment that was a beacon to fishermen and storytellers posing as fishermen, died Wednesday of a heart attack in the kitchen where she had happily toiled for the past 70 years. She was 92.The flamboyant and colorful Mrs. Harrison, who was called "The Grand Dame of the Chesapeake," was known more affectionately as "Miss Alice" to everyone from presidents to her less exalted regular customers.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
From the field to the table is a short walk at the home of Mary Florence Smith. She cans and stews home-grown tomatoes every summer, and every winter her grown children return home to Rolling Acres Farm to help cure the hams."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer CO; RECIPE FINDER | November 17, 1993
Sesame noodles, spicy Cajun chicken and apricot jam? Plan to serve these winners, and the dinner bell will be welcome music.Lisa Underriner of Owings Mills asked for a sesame noodles recipe similar to the one served at the American Cafe, and Susan Manning of Owings Mills and Ruth H. Roulette of Tilghman Island responded with Chef Gilles Syglowski's choices.Julie McYeaton of Salisbury requested a spicy Cajun chicken made in a crock pot with stewed tomatoes and celery, and Kim Skellan of Finksburg sent in the chef's choice.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 6, 1998
Gertrude's, the new restaurant in the Baltimore Museum of Art, is a work in progress. You can see the potential, but it isn't there yet.Give John Shields credit. The cookbook author and TV show host came up with a great idea for his restaurant. Why open just another seafood place when this year we've already seen the arrival of two good ones: McCormick & Schmick's and Legal Sea Foods downtown.Instead, Shields has Gertrude's firmly grounded in the Chesapeake Bay region. When tourists come to Baltimore and want authentic Maryland seafood, are they going to go to chains from the Northwest and Boston?
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 5, 1998
Responses to requests for Frog Eye Salad and stewed tomatoes have been received and tested. You are in for a treat.Frog Eye Salad was the request of Debbie Trimp of Sioux Falls, S.D. She wanted a version of this quick and simple noodle dish that didn't use eggs. Her response came from Trina Herll of Brandon, S.D.Ann Bailey of Pasadena wanted stewed tomatoes, and Mary W. Earl of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "came from Ms. Brown's cookbook at the Hilltop House in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. I have made these for the last 40 to 50 years.
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
From the field to the table is a short walk at the home of Mary Florence Smith. She cans and stews home-grown tomatoes every summer, and every winter her grown children return home to Rolling Acres Farm to help cure the hams."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1996
Alice G. Harrison, matriarch of Harrison's Chesapeake House, a Tilghman Island eating and lodging establishment that was a beacon to fishermen and storytellers posing as fishermen, died Wednesday of a heart attack in the kitchen where she had happily toiled for the past 70 years. She was 92.The flamboyant and colorful Mrs. Harrison, who was called "The Grand Dame of the Chesapeake," was known more affectionately as "Miss Alice" to everyone from presidents to her less exalted regular customers.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 3, 1996
IT IS the '90s, and we're supposed to be more than merely "active." We're supposed to be "interactive." This is computer lingo meaning to communicate electronically. It is my understanding that to do this well, you have to be "wired" or "webbed" and maybe even "home-paged." I am none of the above.But I do have some interesting mail from readers, about waffles, shad, and the resurgence of the fondue pot, to share with other readers. So let's get interactive the old-fashioned way, let's read letters.
NEWS
By HELEN CHAPPELL | April 5, 1995
Oysterback, Maryland. -- Fresh dispatches from the Oysterback Bugeye:The ''Patamoke Peeper'' has been apprehended by Sheriff Wesley Briscoe. It turned out to be the town criminal, Alonzo Deaver, who was not peeping, as many have thought, but stealing shrubbery for resale to new homeowners at the Shallow Shore Doublewide Park. That's Alonzo's story and he says he's sticking to it. . . .Paisley Redmond is back at home with wife Beth and son Olivier after his return from an unexpected trip to New York in the back of the Patamoke Seafood Truck along with a quarter ton of Cap'n Fike's Flash Frozen Breaded Clam Strips.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | September 13, 2006
Lenore Greenway of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a long-lost recipe for an eggplant casserole, made with eggplant, tomatoes, onions and crackers as well as some other ingredients. Mitzi Hines of Laurinburg, N.C., sent in a recipe for a casserole that sounds very much like what Greenway was looking for. She says it is from a cookbook from the 1950s. The eggplant is boiled and sauteed with onion and garlic; then stewed tomatoes are added to make something that resembles a ratatouille.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 6, 1998
Gertrude's, the new restaurant in the Baltimore Museum of Art, is a work in progress. You can see the potential, but it isn't there yet.Give John Shields credit. The cookbook author and TV show host came up with a great idea for his restaurant. Why open just another seafood place when this year we've already seen the arrival of two good ones: McCormick & Schmick's and Legal Sea Foods downtown.Instead, Shields has Gertrude's firmly grounded in the Chesapeake Bay region. When tourists come to Baltimore and want authentic Maryland seafood, are they going to go to chains from the Northwest and Boston?
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | September 7, 1994
The flavors of the potatoes, cabbage and stewed tomatoes are as rustic as the presentation of Stewed Tomatoes with Potato Peasant Purses. The purses can be made in advance, then warmed just before serving. A sprinkling of grated Cheddar cheese on top is a perfect complement to this dish. These purses go nicely with grilled English-style sausages (from "Tomatoes: A Country Garden Cookbook" by Jesse Cool, Collins Publishers, $19.95)Stewed TomatoesServes 31 medium yellow onion1 small red or yellow bell pepper1 stalk celery2 tablespoons canola oil3 pounds ripe tomatoes, coarsely chopped5 to 7 sprigs fresh parsley1/4 to 1/2 cup light brown sugarjuice of 1 to 2 lemons1 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperPEASANT PURSES6 large cabbage leaves, preferably savoy1 medium yellow onion finely chopped2 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter ( 1/3 cup)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer CO; RECIPE FINDER | November 17, 1993
Sesame noodles, spicy Cajun chicken and apricot jam? Plan to serve these winners, and the dinner bell will be welcome music.Lisa Underriner of Owings Mills asked for a sesame noodles recipe similar to the one served at the American Cafe, and Susan Manning of Owings Mills and Ruth H. Roulette of Tilghman Island responded with Chef Gilles Syglowski's choices.Julie McYeaton of Salisbury requested a spicy Cajun chicken made in a crock pot with stewed tomatoes and celery, and Kim Skellan of Finksburg sent in the chef's choice.
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