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NEWS
By Bob Benson | May 22, 2012
Congress may soon finalize the 2012 Farm Bill, and that hefty document should concern all of us in Maryland - especially when it comes to clean water. As we all know, the Chesapeake Bay is the nation's largest and most productive estuary. However, the bay is threatened by pollution from its major tributaries, including fertilizer-laden waters from farmlands. Each summer, nutrient runoff leads to algal growth, resulting in oxygen depletion as the algae decays. The loss of dissolved oxygen causes more than a third of the Chesapeake Bay to become a "dead zone.
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NEWS
By Bob Benson | May 22, 2012
Congress may soon finalize the 2012 Farm Bill, and that hefty document should concern all of us in Maryland - especially when it comes to clean water. As we all know, the Chesapeake Bay is the nation's largest and most productive estuary. However, the bay is threatened by pollution from its major tributaries, including fertilizer-laden waters from farmlands. Each summer, nutrient runoff leads to algal growth, resulting in oxygen depletion as the algae decays. The loss of dissolved oxygen causes more than a third of the Chesapeake Bay to become a "dead zone.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | October 23, 1992
The fifth annual Catoctin Convocation Sunday will mirror the diversity and unity of the United Church of Christ.The conference will focus on stewardship, the role of children in church, connecting Scripture to daily life as well as environmental and health issues.From 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Western Maryland College, about 150 lay and clergy members will participate in the program, which includes 16 workshops on topics from the church's missions to its local activities."The Catoctin Association covers all the UCC churches in a three-state area," said Jean Bechtel, secretary of St. Mary's United Church of Christ in Silver Run.Her church's members helped organize the convocation.
EXPLORE
May 11, 2012
Editor: I would be remiss if I didn't note the passing of the longest serving voice for Deer Creek land stewardship. Sensible politics and characteristics of a true gentleman. Monroe Duke was 94 and his beautiful wife, Olga, who predeceased him, were the kind of couple that continue to keep Darlington's integrity intact. Bob Chance Darlington
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1999
FROM THE time he was 16 years old, Aelred Geis knew what his life's work would be. He made up his mind to become a wildlife biologist.A native of the Chicago area, Geis witnessed substantial development on the outskirts of the city and saw its impact on wildlife.Some 50 years later, after earning a doctorate in wildlife management, teaching at Michigan State University and working for 30 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Geis is still practicing his life's work.In honor of his recent efforts, Howard County Conservancy presented its first Sen. James Clark Jr. Land Stewardship Award to Geis on Tuesday.
NEWS
By David Jenkins | October 3, 2008
This two-part commentary from Bay Journal News Service presents the views of the Republican and Democratic candidates for president on their policies regarding the Chesapeake Bay region. To appreciate the impact of a McCain administration on the health of the Chesapeake Bay, one needs to understand the strong stewardship ethic that guides Sen. John McCain's policy decisions. Mr. McCain cites three strong influences that shape his approach to protecting the environment. The first is his personal hero, Theodore Roosevelt.
NEWS
By James Gorman and James Gorman,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2003
It stretches from the forests of New England to the farmlands of the Mid-Atlantic, from woodlands where bobcats scream and cerulean warblers warble to lawns where deer and groundhogs graze. More than 4.5 million people drink water drawn from its aquifers. Fourteen million people use it each year for recreation, more than visit Yellowstone, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon combined. Twenty-five million people live within an hour's drive. It has been mapped, studied and reported on. Conservationists are trying to preserve as much of it as possible.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 2002
NEW YORK - Prospective 2004 Democratic presidential candidates told the pro-business, pro-growth Democratic Leadership Council here yesterday that corporate corruption must be attacked, but not in a way that would brand the party as anti-business. Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut, one of five Democrats addressing the group, said that while "we New Democrats are proud to call ourselves pro-business, now we should make clear that the best way to help business is to come down hard on those who betray it."
NEWS
January 18, 2006
The B&O Railroad Station Museum in Ellicott City celebrated its 30 years of stewardship by Historic Ellicott City Inc. on Sunday with a reception attended by county officials, including County Executive James N. Robey. Visitors were offered free museum tours. Historic Ellicott City will transfer operation of the museum to Baltimore's Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum, starting next month. Courtney B. Wilson, the Baltimore museum's executive director, told The Sun last month that the station, which was completed in 1831 when the B&O Railroad put down track from Baltimore, "gives us a chance to use the ... station as sort of a platform to do education programs and exhibits on the first 35 years of railroading."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 3, 1995
BOSTON -- Despite rising incomes, Roman Catholics are far less willing to dig into their pockets to support their churches than members of other religious denominations, according to a recent report.The average Catholic family contributes $386 annually to its church, compared with $1,696 for families in the Assemblies of God, the denomination with the highest level of giving, according to studies by Catholic University in Washington.Average annual family contributions for the other three denominations included in the report were $1,154 for Southern Baptists, $1,085 for Presbyterians and $746 for Evangelical Lutherans.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | October 11, 2011
They've grown up during an era of unprecedented interest in the environment, and on Oct. 7, students from Pot Spring Elementary School and Dulaney High School turned their knowledge, and public service intentions, into action. Upperclassmen in John Enders' horticulture class at Dulaney joined first- and third-graders from Pot Spring to plant more than 30 trees on the fringe of a forested area between the two schools. Along with other recently planted trees and the long grasses that surround them, the new trees will act as a buffer for a stream that runs through the woods behind Pot Spring.
NEWS
January 13, 2011
For more than a generation, efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay have treated the family farmer as gently as one might a friend or relative. Where other industries have been forced to meet more stringent rules and taxpayers have shelled out billions of dollars for better sewage treatment plants and the like, agriculture has been given more subsidies and incentives and offered more voluntary regulations than any other major polluter. And make no mistake — agriculture is a major polluter.
NEWS
December 25, 2010
The expression In vino veritas roughly translates from Latin into "in wine, there is truth. " Pliny the Elder, the Roman author who first turned the phrase, was observing how alcohol can loosen the tongue and cause people to reveal things they might not have intended. One might also note that allegedly independent reports on wine shipping can be revealing too. Comptroller Peter Franchot's lengthy missive on the topic — released last week — reveals not only how nonsensical are many of the objections to direct shipment to Maryland consumers, but also how resistant his own agency is to endorsing needed reforms.
NEWS
August 25, 2010
It was recently argued on this page that major universities across the country — including a few in Maryland — are administratively bloated. I agree that institutions of higher education are obliged to be responsible stewards of our funding. But the argument leading to the assessment of university "bloat" was reached through a flawed process. In the original report referenced in his recent op-ed, Jay P. Greene of the Goldwater Institute acknowledges that in collecting data from the Department of Education, he included two separate categories as constituting administrative employees.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
Events over the next six months will determine whether Michael S. Steele gets another term as Republican national chairman, party leaders said after Steele defended his financial stewardship in a private meeting Tuesday. "He addressed what he called the big elephant in the room," said Saul Anuzis, a national committeeman from Michigan, referring to news accounts of lavish Republican National Committee spending. "Nobody wanted to ask the question, and he came out and addressed it," said Anuzis, who lost to Steele in the chairman's race and has become an ally.
NEWS
By David Jenkins | October 3, 2008
This two-part commentary from Bay Journal News Service presents the views of the Republican and Democratic candidates for president on their policies regarding the Chesapeake Bay region. To appreciate the impact of a McCain administration on the health of the Chesapeake Bay, one needs to understand the strong stewardship ethic that guides Sen. John McCain's policy decisions. Mr. McCain cites three strong influences that shape his approach to protecting the environment. The first is his personal hero, Theodore Roosevelt.
EXPLORE
May 11, 2012
Editor: I would be remiss if I didn't note the passing of the longest serving voice for Deer Creek land stewardship. Sensible politics and characteristics of a true gentleman. Monroe Duke was 94 and his beautiful wife, Olga, who predeceased him, were the kind of couple that continue to keep Darlington's integrity intact. Bob Chance Darlington
NEWS
December 3, 2003
Suddenly on Monday, December 1, 2003, CHARLES A., beloved husband of Sheila L. Klipp (nee Meekins); devoted father of Deborah K. Tucker, and her husband Al, and Charles Eric Klipp; brother of Shirley Gabriele, and her husband Rocco; and loving grandfather of Jesse, Laura, Sarah, Rachael, and Rusty. Friends may call at Loring Byers Funeral Directors, Inc., 8728 Liberty Road (two miles west of beltway exit 18-B), Wednesday, 3 to 8 p.m., where prayers will be said Thursday at 1 P.M. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 26, 2008
We know about the stark-raving looniness that characterized Marge Schott's time as owner of the Cincinnati Reds, and the Madness of King George of the Bronx has been well documented. Now, Al Davis' stewardship of the Oakland Raiders is taking a decidedly unfortunate turn. It was reported yesterday that Davis - once considered one of the most canny operators in sports - sent a letter to coach Lane Kiffin asking him to resign. Kiffin has been on the job one year, and the early word is that he refused.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 26, 2007
The most enjoyable aspect of watching the HMS Hillary take on water is the prospect that Bill - and his cult of personality - will go down with the ship, too. Bill Clinton has been stumping for his wife on the Iowa hustings, framing the election as a referendum on his tenure as president. Last month in Muscatine (during the same speech in which he falsely claimed to have opposed the Iraq war from the beginning), he told the assembled Democrats that HMS Hillary could transport America "back to the future."
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