Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStevie Ray Vaughan
IN THE NEWS

Stevie Ray Vaughan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 11, 1999
On Aug. 26, 1990, an all-star blues concert was booked into the Alpine Valley Music Theatre in East Troy, Wis. Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Stevie Ray Vaughan, his brother Jimmie Vaughan, and Buddy Guy were on the bill, and they concluded the show with all five jamming together on the Robert Johnson chestnut "Sweet Home Chicago."A few hours after the show, the musicians and their entourage boarded three helicopters bound for Chicago. Two made the trip without a hitch, but the third crashed into a fog-shrouded hill, killing all aboard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 11, 1999
On Aug. 26, 1990, an all-star blues concert was booked into the Alpine Valley Music Theatre in East Troy, Wis. Eric Clapton, Robert Cray, Stevie Ray Vaughan, his brother Jimmie Vaughan, and Buddy Guy were on the bill, and they concluded the show with all five jamming together on the Robert Johnson chestnut "Sweet Home Chicago."A few hours after the show, the musicians and their entourage boarded three helicopters bound for Chicago. Two made the trip without a hitch, but the third crashed into a fog-shrouded hill, killing all aboard.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lynn Van Matre and Lynn Van Matre,Chicago Tribune | August 11, 1993
There was one empty seat left on the first of several chartered helicopters leaving Alpine Valley Music Theater in East Troy, Wis., in the early hours of Aug. 27, 1990, and Stevie Ray Vaughan snagged it.Moments earlier, the Grammy-winning Texas blues guitarist had been trading torrid licks onstage with Eric Clapton; it was part of the grand finale of a show that found Vaughan's band, Double Trouble, opening for the veteran blues rocker. Now Vaughan was in a hurry to get back to his hotel in Chicago and put in his nightly long-distance call to his teen-age fiance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 8, 1996
Tom Petty and the HeartbreakersSongs and Music from the Motion Picture 'She's the One' (Warner Bros. 46285)Few rockers have as much fun with form as Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers do. On "Songs and Music From the Motion Picture 'She's the One,' " Petty and the boys do a bit of everything, from dramatic, wide-screen story-songs ("Grew Up Fast") to droll, Dylanesque ravers ("Zero From Outer Space") to the chiming, Byrds-influenced pop we normally associate with him ("California"). Heck, they even take a stab at lounge jazz on one track (the brief, moody instrumental "Airport")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 8, 1996
Tom Petty and the HeartbreakersSongs and Music from the Motion Picture 'She's the One' (Warner Bros. 46285)Few rockers have as much fun with form as Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers do. On "Songs and Music From the Motion Picture 'She's the One,' " Petty and the boys do a bit of everything, from dramatic, wide-screen story-songs ("Grew Up Fast") to droll, Dylanesque ravers ("Zero From Outer Space") to the chiming, Byrds-influenced pop we normally associate with him ("California"). Heck, they even take a stab at lounge jazz on one track (the brief, moody instrumental "Airport")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1991
THE SKY IS CRYINGStevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble (Epic 47390)Posthumous albums are, by nature, hodgepodge affairs, invariably consisting of leftovers and often sounding like it. Stevie Ray Vaughan's "The Sky Is Crying" is a happy exception, however, in part thanks to the painstaking care with which Vaughan's brother Jimmie assembled the album, but mostly because of the astonishing consistency of the late guitarist's playing. It hardly matters whether Stevie Ray is tossing off an upbeat blues number like "Empty Arms," exploring the possibilities of a jazz tune like "Chitlins Con Carne" or pulling new insights from a rock classic like "Little Wing" -- his solos are never less than stunning, making this album an ideal tribute.
FEATURES
By Brian Byrnes and Brian Byrnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 6, 1996
Dressed to kill in black pants, vest and T-shirt, Josh Smith works the crowd at Cafe Tattoo like a seasoned veteran.As he picks his Fender Stratocaster, his long, curly brown locks flow out of his trademark black Stetson. His mannerisms offer up an eerie resemblance to his late mentor, Stevie Ray Vaughan. Josh jumps off the stage to take an extended solo during Jimi Hendrix's "Machine Gun." The 16-year-old guitar phenom was in town recently with his band, the Rhino Cats, making a stop on his three-month national tour.
FEATURES
By Mario Tarradell and Mario Tarradell,Dallas Morning News | April 23, 1995
One of the most respected names in American music doesn't have a recording contract.Yet the power and influence of "Austin City Limits," now in its 20th season on PBS (airing on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, at 6 pm. Saturdays), carries the clout of multiplatinum record sales and truckloads of industry awards.Ever since its 1976 debut, "Austin City Limits" has steadily carved a reputation for being more concerned about showcasing good music than chasing the trends and one-hit wonders that characterize so many music-oriented TV shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | October 26, 1995
Considering how long he's been around, it seems kind of silly to describe Luther Allison as a hot new blues player. After all, he's been playing the blues professionally since 1954 and recorded several albums in the '70s for the Delmark and Gordy labels.But because Allison spent the '80s in Europe, American blues fans lost sight of him -- until last year, that is, when he released "Soul Fixin' Man," his first American album in two decades. Between his ferocious, soulful vocals and searing, string-bending guitar solos, Allison came back with an intensity that left listeners stunned.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | June 29, 2006
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Rob Ignozzi, drums and percussion; Ryan LaHam, bass; Mark Hopkins, guitars, vocals and keyboards Founded in --2005 Style --electric singer/songwriter pop Influenced by --Paul McCartney, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, Jaco Pastorius, Stewart Copeland Notable --Hopkins left his previous band, Tribe of Ben, to move in a more mature musical direction. He says he tries to write intelligent music with lyrics that tell stories. The band will release an EP, Angry Mob, this summer and hopes to release a full-length album next year.
FEATURES
By Brian Byrnes and Brian Byrnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 6, 1996
Dressed to kill in black pants, vest and T-shirt, Josh Smith works the crowd at Cafe Tattoo like a seasoned veteran.As he picks his Fender Stratocaster, his long, curly brown locks flow out of his trademark black Stetson. His mannerisms offer up an eerie resemblance to his late mentor, Stevie Ray Vaughan. Josh jumps off the stage to take an extended solo during Jimi Hendrix's "Machine Gun." The 16-year-old guitar phenom was in town recently with his band, the Rhino Cats, making a stop on his three-month national tour.
FEATURES
By Mario Tarradell and Mario Tarradell,Dallas Morning News | April 23, 1995
One of the most respected names in American music doesn't have a recording contract.Yet the power and influence of "Austin City Limits," now in its 20th season on PBS (airing on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, at 6 pm. Saturdays), carries the clout of multiplatinum record sales and truckloads of industry awards.Ever since its 1976 debut, "Austin City Limits" has steadily carved a reputation for being more concerned about showcasing good music than chasing the trends and one-hit wonders that characterize so many music-oriented TV shows.
FEATURES
By Lynn Van Matre and Lynn Van Matre,Chicago Tribune | August 11, 1993
There was one empty seat left on the first of several chartered helicopters leaving Alpine Valley Music Theater in East Troy, Wis., in the early hours of Aug. 27, 1990, and Stevie Ray Vaughan snagged it.Moments earlier, the Grammy-winning Texas blues guitarist had been trading torrid licks onstage with Eric Clapton; it was part of the grand finale of a show that found Vaughan's band, Double Trouble, opening for the veteran blues rocker. Now Vaughan was in a hurry to get back to his hotel in Chicago and put in his nightly long-distance call to his teen-age fiance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1991
THE SKY IS CRYINGStevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble (Epic 47390)Posthumous albums are, by nature, hodgepodge affairs, invariably consisting of leftovers and often sounding like it. Stevie Ray Vaughan's "The Sky Is Crying" is a happy exception, however, in part thanks to the painstaking care with which Vaughan's brother Jimmie assembled the album, but mostly because of the astonishing consistency of the late guitarist's playing. It hardly matters whether Stevie Ray is tossing off an upbeat blues number like "Empty Arms," exploring the possibilities of a jazz tune like "Chitlins Con Carne" or pulling new insights from a rock classic like "Little Wing" -- his solos are never less than stunning, making this album an ideal tribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 29, 2005
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Rob Dubois, drums and vocals; Mike Bakke, bass and vocals; Fred Hill, keyboards, vocals; Riddie Becker, guitar and vocals Founded in --2003 Style --hip-hop, funk and rock Influenced by --Sublime, 311, Stevie Ray Vaughan, the Roots, Martin Sexton Notable --When the band played the Eight by Ten Club several months ago for their album release party, they almost sold out the venue. The album, Raised by Wolves, is hardly down-beat. Quotable --"We try and be a party band," Becker said.
FEATURES
September 25, 1990
Report on Mrs. BushBarbara Bush dipped into Sidney Sheldon and Scott Turow over the summer, took a fancy to television's "America's Funniest Home Videos" but was baffled by Bart Simpson and his acid-tongued cartoon family. "It was the dumbest thing I have ever seen, but it's a family thing, and I guess it's clean," she said in a recent interview in People magazine. During her summer vacation in Kennebunkport, Maine, the first lady said she found time to work out daily and catch up on her reading,Star wars?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.