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By Eric Adams BTC | May 24, 1991
STEVEN SCOTT GALLERY515 N. Charles St. "The New Romanticism."Like 19th century Romantic painters and poets, the artists whose works are presented here (through June 29) have abandoned the confines of the studio to seek their inspiration in nature. Baltimoreans Tom Miller and Philip Koch, and New Yorkers Wolf Kahn and April Gornik are among the 24 neo-romantics featured. Gallery owner Steven Scott says "all the scenes have a sense of infinity to them. You can see out forever and ever." The artists use wide vistas, sometimes landscapes and occasionally cityscapes, to create a sense of drama -- and at least one, William Lesch, uses artificially colored light to give a desert scene an almost surreal quality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
As 2009 begins in an uncertain economic climate, local museums and galleries are launching a variety of initiatives - from 200th birthday tributes for Edgar Allan Poe to a Bible story told with comic-strip art - to draw visitors in the new year. One reason for the diversity of offerings is the mix of groups and organizations that present art in and around Baltimore. They include everything from commercial galleries to nonprofit venues to full-fledged museums supported with public and private funds.
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FEATURES
January 3, 2006
ART At Steven Scott Today, Steven Scott Gallery kicks off the exhibit Seven Re markable Regional Realist Women, featuring Deborah English, Patricia Tobacco For rester, Kazhia Kolb, Amy Lamb, Kathryn O'Grady, Katja Ox man and Paula Waterman. The gallery is at 9169 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills. Hours are noon-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Satur days and by appointment. Call 410-902- 9300 or go to stevenscottgal lery.com.
FEATURES
January 3, 2006
ART At Steven Scott Today, Steven Scott Gallery kicks off the exhibit Seven Re markable Regional Realist Women, featuring Deborah English, Patricia Tobacco For rester, Kazhia Kolb, Amy Lamb, Kathryn O'Grady, Katja Ox man and Paula Waterman. The gallery is at 9169 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills. Hours are noon-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Satur days and by appointment. Call 410-902- 9300 or go to stevenscottgal lery.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 28, 1995
Steven Scott's current show is just called "Pennsylvania," and it features scenes from our neighbor to the north in works by four artists. Robert Andriulli's hillsides are unsettling and vaguely threatening, as if something bad is about to happen. More placid and welcoming are David Hopkins' farm scenes. Joseph Sweeney contributes farm scenes as well, but also pictures of rowers on rivers that have great precedents in the works of that other Pennsylvania artist, Thomas Eakins. And Matthew Daub presents unromanticized small town scenes, as in "Willow Street" here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine L. Fillat | September 27, 1991
STEVEN SCOTT GALLERY515 N. Charles St. Cornelia Foss: New PaintingsTo view many of this artist's works is to enter her studio, with its carefully placed open books, plates of fruit, vases of Casablanca lilies and a view out the window. Always working from life, Cornelia Foss paints what gallery owner Steven Scott ,, calls "soft focus expressive realism": With rich, urgent brush strokes in a palette of blues, she creates relaxing vistas full of great energy. Gerrit Henry, contributing editor for Art News (who wrote the exhibit catalog essay)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck 'Summer Skies' are on the walls at Steven Scott Gallery | August 7, 1994
Playwrights Festival presents sixth play by Towson lawyerIn the 13-year history of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, no playwright has had more scripts produced than Robert R. Bowie Jr., a Towson lawyer whose sixth festival production, "Between the Lines," opens Friday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St.Bowie's new play focuses on a husband and wife, beginning in the present, flashing back to their days at a progressive Baltimore high school...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 27, 1995
Even light can look menacingRobert Andriulli's paintings, such as "Estuary" here, make landscape, clouds and even light look menacing, and we step into his spaces at our own risk. His works are among the best in Steven Scott's current exhibit, "Waterworks," a show built around the theme of water that includes many of the gallery's regular artists. Among them are gentle pastels by Anne Marie Fleming; big watercolors by Patricia Tobacco Forrester and small watercolors by Hollis Sigler; rowing pictures by Joseph Sweeney; a couple of lively scenes by Raoul Middleman; and Tom Miller's latest piece of painted furniture, "King Neptune's Treasure Chest," crowned by a lively fish with bright yellow scales.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 1992
Tom Miller's furniture, now showing at Steven Scott, can be appreciated on a lot of levels, not the least of which is that it makes us happy.To be serious first -- let's eat our vegetables before we have dessert, so to speak -- there's the ecological level. Like other art furniture makers, Miller recycles old objects. Tables and chairs and cabinets and bookcases that you or I would overlook as totally unsuitable, Miller sees as color and pattern and statement and fun, and rescues them from oblivion to do double duty as utilitarian objects and works of art.There's also the African-American statement level.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | January 8, 1995
Hollis Sigler's seemingly childlike works turn out to be 0) anything but childishChicago artist Hollis Sigler has gained a national reputation for her paintings and drawings about personal issues, done in what's called a faux-naif style -- at first glance they might look like the work of a child, but they are really done with great sophistication. In recent years her works have dealt with her extended bout with cancer, but recent works such as "Save Room for Dessert" in her latest show at Steven Scott return to an earlier theme: love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 1, 2004
Amy Lamb's large-scale color photographs of floral subjects, on view in the group show at Steven Scott Gallery in Owings Mills through Feb. 28, are among the loveliest examples of the genre this reviewer has seen in recent years. Images of flowers almost invariably call to mind their traditional association with the transience of life, and of beauty, too. Yet Lamb's photographs, meticulously lit and enlarged to monumental scale, also invert that identification with their sense of permanence, of eternal qualities of delicacy and freshness that are continually reinvented with the flowering of each new blossom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 28, 1995
Steven Scott's current show is just called "Pennsylvania," and it features scenes from our neighbor to the north in works by four artists. Robert Andriulli's hillsides are unsettling and vaguely threatening, as if something bad is about to happen. More placid and welcoming are David Hopkins' farm scenes. Joseph Sweeney contributes farm scenes as well, but also pictures of rowers on rivers that have great precedents in the works of that other Pennsylvania artist, Thomas Eakins. And Matthew Daub presents unromanticized small town scenes, as in "Willow Street" here.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 27, 1995
Even light can look menacingRobert Andriulli's paintings, such as "Estuary" here, make landscape, clouds and even light look menacing, and we step into his spaces at our own risk. His works are among the best in Steven Scott's current exhibit, "Waterworks," a show built around the theme of water that includes many of the gallery's regular artists. Among them are gentle pastels by Anne Marie Fleming; big watercolors by Patricia Tobacco Forrester and small watercolors by Hollis Sigler; rowing pictures by Joseph Sweeney; a couple of lively scenes by Raoul Middleman; and Tom Miller's latest piece of painted furniture, "King Neptune's Treasure Chest," crowned by a lively fish with bright yellow scales.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | January 8, 1995
Hollis Sigler's seemingly childlike works turn out to be 0) anything but childishChicago artist Hollis Sigler has gained a national reputation for her paintings and drawings about personal issues, done in what's called a faux-naif style -- at first glance they might look like the work of a child, but they are really done with great sophistication. In recent years her works have dealt with her extended bout with cancer, but recent works such as "Save Room for Dessert" in her latest show at Steven Scott return to an earlier theme: love.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 22, 1994
One of Raoul Middleman's most perceptive statements about his art, in a revealing 1990 essay, was, ". . . skies with lots of hurtling clouds, before or after a storm, are my thing." If there are any doubts about that, a visit to Steven Scott, site of "Raoul Middleman: Recent Landscapes, Portraits and Still Lifes," will dispel it.The skies in Middleman's landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes show him at his energetic best. His tense, impatient brush stroke lends his clouds a fine dynamic sense, and his color adds to the intensity of these skies.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck 'Summer Skies' are on the walls at Steven Scott Gallery | August 7, 1994
Playwrights Festival presents sixth play by Towson lawyerIn the 13-year history of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, no playwright has had more scripts produced than Robert R. Bowie Jr., a Towson lawyer whose sixth festival production, "Between the Lines," opens Friday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St.Bowie's new play focuses on a husband and wife, beginning in the present, flashing back to their days at a progressive Baltimore high school...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 22, 1994
One of Raoul Middleman's most perceptive statements about his art, in a revealing 1990 essay, was, ". . . skies with lots of hurtling clouds, before or after a storm, are my thing." If there are any doubts about that, a visit to Steven Scott, site of "Raoul Middleman: Recent Landscapes, Portraits and Still Lifes," will dispel it.The skies in Middleman's landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes show him at his energetic best. His tense, impatient brush stroke lends his clouds a fine dynamic sense, and his color adds to the intensity of these skies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
As 2009 begins in an uncertain economic climate, local museums and galleries are launching a variety of initiatives - from 200th birthday tributes for Edgar Allan Poe to a Bible story told with comic-strip art - to draw visitors in the new year. One reason for the diversity of offerings is the mix of groups and organizations that present art in and around Baltimore. They include everything from commercial galleries to nonprofit venues to full-fledged museums supported with public and private funds.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 1992
Tom Miller's furniture, now showing at Steven Scott, can be appreciated on a lot of levels, not the least of which is that it makes us happy.To be serious first -- let's eat our vegetables before we have dessert, so to speak -- there's the ecological level. Like other art furniture makers, Miller recycles old objects. Tables and chairs and cabinets and bookcases that you or I would overlook as totally unsuitable, Miller sees as color and pattern and statement and fun, and rescues them from oblivion to do double duty as utilitarian objects and works of art.There's also the African-American statement level.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine L. Fillat | September 27, 1991
STEVEN SCOTT GALLERY515 N. Charles St. Cornelia Foss: New PaintingsTo view many of this artist's works is to enter her studio, with its carefully placed open books, plates of fruit, vases of Casablanca lilies and a view out the window. Always working from life, Cornelia Foss paints what gallery owner Steven Scott ,, calls "soft focus expressive realism": With rich, urgent brush strokes in a palette of blues, she creates relaxing vistas full of great energy. Gerrit Henry, contributing editor for Art News (who wrote the exhibit catalog essay)
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