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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
Steven Raichlen has left his tropical hat at home, but he's brought a jar of Puerto Rican cilantro pesto and some toasted coconut chips to sample it with on his Baltimore book-promoting tour. "It's called ajilimojili," he says. "Ah-HEE-li-moh-HEE-li. It's such a fun word to say. Aji is the Spanish word for pepper, and mojo is the word for sauce, so it's like, 'a little pepper sauce.' "The recipe, which includes onions, garlic, bell peppers, cilantro, oil and vinegar, is one of 70 in Mr. Raichlen's new book, "The Caribbean Pantry Cookbook" (Artisan, $25)
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May 26, 2010
Moroccan Grilled Pepper Salad Makes: 4-6 servings 3 red bell peppers, plus 3 Anaheim or Cubanelle peppers (or 4 green bell peppers and 5 poblano peppers) 2 red ripe tomatoes, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch dice 1/2 sweet onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro, or mint, or flat-leaf parsley , roughly chopped 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (more to taste)
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NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | May 5, 2004
Steven Raichlen, an authority in matters of fire and smoke, is standing in front of his former family home at 4117 Ronis Road in the Milford Mill area of Baltimore County talking about the time his mother almost set herself on fire while grilling supper. It was in the 1960s, when cooking supper over a charcoal fire was a relatively new phenomenon in America. His mother, Frances, who was an accomplished ballet dancer but not much of a cook, tried to hurry along some smoldering charcoal by pouring a can of gasoline on the coals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Steven Raichlen, local boy turned world barbecue expert, was in Owings Mills on Friday afternoon talking, teaching and eating barbecue. Biting into a smoked pork rib, Raichlen lauded its texture. "It still has some chew to it," he said. Praise from the barbecue master brought a smile to the face of Chris Bernat, general manager of Famous Dave's, the Owings Mills restaurant that cooked the pork. Raichlen, who splits time between homes in Florida and Massachusetts, was at the Maryland Public Television in Owings Mills to promote his new TV series "Primal Grill with Steven Raichlen."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010
Moroccan Grilled Pepper Salad Makes: 4-6 servings 3 red bell peppers, plus 3 Anaheim or Cubanelle peppers (or 4 green bell peppers and 5 poblano peppers) 2 red ripe tomatoes, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch dice 1/2 sweet onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro, or mint, or flat-leaf parsley , roughly chopped 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (more to taste)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Steven Raichlen, local boy turned world barbecue expert, was in Owings Mills on Friday afternoon talking, teaching and eating barbecue. Biting into a smoked pork rib, Raichlen lauded its texture. "It still has some chew to it," he said. Praise from the barbecue master brought a smile to the face of Chris Bernat, general manager of Famous Dave's, the Owings Mills restaurant that cooked the pork. Raichlen, who splits time between homes in Florida and Massachusetts, was at the Maryland Public Television in Owings Mills to promote his new TV series "Primal Grill with Steven Raichlen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
As "Barbecue Bible" author Steven Raichlen points out in "Raichlen's Tailgating! 31 Righteous Recipes for On-the-Go Grilling," his latest ebook, "Long before NASCAR and the Super Bowl, there was tailgating. This distinctly American institution dates back to 1869, and probably earlier, when Rutgers and Princeton played their first intercollegiate football game. Students gathered before the contest to drink and socialize, so legend goes, serving their picnics on the lowered tailgates of horse-drawn wagons.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 14, 1995
"I grew up on TV dinners," Steven Raichlen said with a smile. His late mother, Frances, was a ballerina with the Baltimore Ballet and devoted most of her artistic energy to dancing, not cooking, he said.Nonetheless Raichlen, now the author of award-winning cookbooks, said he has fond memories of his youthful eating adventures in Baltimore.Big family meals, he said, were regularly held at the homes of his two grandmothers, who live a few blocks apart in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
It was those last 3 inches that did it -- the ones Steven Raichlen noticed padding his waist. A French-trained chef, cooking teacher, columnist and author, Mr. Raichlen knew exactly what put on the pounds, and exactly what he had to do to get rid of them."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 19, 1995
Steven Raichlen's philosophy of low-fat cooking is simple: "Make food tasty and satisfying by using flavorings instead of fat." The award-winning cookbook author first applied his theory in "High-Flavor Low-Fat Cooking" a couple of years ago; now he's expanded it to include vegetarian dishes with "High-Flavor Low-Fat Vegetarian Cooking" (Viking, $24.95). Mr. Raichlen is a cooking teacher who lives in Florida; he has ties to Baltimore through family members. Here is a sample recipe:Not Chopped LiverServes 42 eggs1 tablespoon olive oil1 small onion, finely chopped5 ounces fresh mushrooms, finely chopped (about 2 cups before chopping)
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | May 5, 2004
Steven Raichlen, an authority in matters of fire and smoke, is standing in front of his former family home at 4117 Ronis Road in the Milford Mill area of Baltimore County talking about the time his mother almost set herself on fire while grilling supper. It was in the 1960s, when cooking supper over a charcoal fire was a relatively new phenomenon in America. His mother, Frances, who was an accomplished ballet dancer but not much of a cook, tried to hurry along some smoldering charcoal by pouring a can of gasoline on the coals.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
Steven Raichlen has left his tropical hat at home, but he's brought a jar of Puerto Rican cilantro pesto and some toasted coconut chips to sample it with on his Baltimore book-promoting tour. "It's called ajilimojili," he says. "Ah-HEE-li-moh-HEE-li. It's such a fun word to say. Aji is the Spanish word for pepper, and mojo is the word for sauce, so it's like, 'a little pepper sauce.' "The recipe, which includes onions, garlic, bell peppers, cilantro, oil and vinegar, is one of 70 in Mr. Raichlen's new book, "The Caribbean Pantry Cookbook" (Artisan, $25)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 30, 2005
Apples smell so good on the barbecue grill that I find myself cooking them there even in these darker, colder months. I have tried them a variety of ways, stuffed with an oatmeal-and-sweetened-butter mixture, sliced and brushed with honey and lemon juice, and sprinkled with cinnamon and brown sugar, a recipe that comes from an unusual source of cuisine, the KOA campground Web site. The truth is that every grilled-apple treatment I tried smelled better than it tasted. The aroma of apples sizzling over an open fire melts me. Grilling alone, however, does not transform the flavor of the apples.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | December 16, 2001
LIFE SEEMS SLOW, same-old, same-old chicken breasts are on the menu, and you are looking for a way to liven up your diet. So you grab a brick and start squashing things. That is what happened recently at our house, during the night the bricks hit the barbecue grill. This was not the first time I had picked up bricks for culinary purposes. One evening back in 1993, I tried to flatten an entire chicken in a frying pan with bricks. Back then I was trying to imitate the Italians, or at least their pollo al mattone dish, as outlined in a Patricia Wells cookbook, Trattoria.
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