Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSteven Oken
IN THE NEWS

Steven Oken

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 12, 2004
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge denied yesterday a last-minute motion to delay convicted killer Steven Oken's scheduled execution on the grounds that he received ineffective representation at his 1991 trial. Oken's lawyers appealed that decision to Maryland Court of Appeals. They have also filed a separate action, set to be heard Monday, in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt. The lawyers also said they plan to file a petition today in U.S. Supreme Court asking that the execution be delayed while they challenge the state's lethal injection method.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 17, 2005
Oh, where do we begin in the lessons to be learned from John Edward Kennedy Jr.'s guilty plea? This week, Kennedy pleaded guilty to the murder of William A. Bassett, who was a science teacher and faculty dean at St. Paul's School. The incident happened in February at the Towson Town Center. Kennedy was the one who used a 20-gauge shotgun to kill Bassett. Kennedy's crime partner, Javon Clark, drove the getaway vehicle. My guess is Kennedy, 19, entered his plea to escape the death penalty.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Fred A. Romano | June 14, 2004
Steven Oken was sentenced to death 13 years ago for the rape and murder of Dawn Marie Garvin of White Marsh, and the Maryland Court of Appeals refused Wednesday to delay his execution by lethal injection. If Mr. Oken is put to death, it will be the first execution in Maryland in six years. Mr. Oken is seeking clemency from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. PEOPLE HAVE asked me whether I am excited about the impending execution of Steven Oken. I tell them no, that I wish I weren't in this situation.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 27, 2004
MARYLAND filled Steven Oken's veins with poison 10 days ago. How many of you feel safer than you did 11 days ago? One other question: Has the state-inflicted death of this pathetic human being made you feel better about the quality of life in this state? Living in a place where, every few years, we strap a guy down and stick chemicals in his arms - there's a special feeling that comes from being a taxpayer who contributes to that. Don't worry. Like the 17-year cicada, the Steven Oken story won't be around much longer, and we won't have to think about it or wrestle with the conscience anymore.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Steven Oken and his mother talk on the phone nearly every day, and she visits him every week. But in 17 years of conversations about such varied topics as local sports teams and world events, there's a topic that Davida Oken says she hasn't ever broached: the crimes that put her son on death row. "Why bring it up?" she asks. "I have never asked him for details, for an explanation. What good would it do?" Steven Oken, the son of a pharmacist, was 25 years old and married in November 1987 when he raped and killed three women.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
Lawyers for Steven Oken argued before the state's highest court yesterday that the convicted killer's scheduled execution should be delayed to allow him to pursue his legal challenge to Maryland's lethal injection method. Oken's lead attorney, Fred Warren Bennett, told the judges on the Maryland Court of Appeals that his client has raised "serious" and "thorny" issues and should be given time to litigate them. But Maryland Assistant Attorney General Ann N. Bosse asked the court not to interfere with Oken's current death warrant -- his third since being convicted and sentenced in 1991 -- and told the judges that Oken's lawsuits and appeals now constitute an "abusive delay."
NEWS
June 22, 2004
THE EXECUTION of Steven Oken last week may have provided long-awaited closure for the families of his victims, but it leaves unresolved the disquieting bias in Maryland's use of the death penalty. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. made good on his campaign pledge to reinstate capital punishment without leading Maryland toward adopting a more tenable standard for applying it. Left unanswered are the doubts and questions raised by a state-commissioned study that prompted the all-too-brief moratorium on executions.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
Convicted killer Steven Oken asked the state's highest court yesterday to halt his execution to allow him to challenge the constitutionality of Maryland's lethal injection process for putting a person to death. In Oken's stay of execution request to the Maryland Court of Appeals, lawyers Fred W. Bennett and Michael E. Lawlor wrote that "due to the insufficiency of the execution protocols and training of execution team members, the killing of Steven Oken will amount to little more than torture."
NEWS
By Paul Moore | June 20, 2004
THE E-MAILS have been arriving steadily for weeks. After a Baltimore County judge signed a death warrant for convicted murderer Steven Oken April 26, and Mr. Oken's attorneys began a series of challenges to stop his scheduled execution, no recent series of articles in The Sun has produced more impassioned responses. Whether the reactions were to stories about Mr. Oken's family or articles on death penalty opponents or stories about the feelings of the families of the three women Mr. Oken killed, the level of interest kept growing.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
The Romano family is getting ready. Betty Romano, mother of Dawn Marie Garvin, has pulled out two of her slain daughter's stuffed animals to bring along if the state carries out the death penalty against the killer. She has affixed handmade signs to the windows of her Buick announcing the scheduled execution. Garvin's father, Fred J. Romano, and brother, Fred A. Romano, are making plans to stand outside Maryland's death row, amid death penalty protesters, on execution night. The Romanos know that Steven Oken - who nearly 17 years ago raped and murdered Garvin and two other women - has a motion before the state's highest court today asking the judges to delay his court-ordered death by lethal injection.
NEWS
June 22, 2004
Travel advisory belies rhetoric on intimidation President Bush decried the murder of Paul M. Johnson Jr. by al-Qaida terrorists in Saudi Arabia, saying that "America will not retreat. America will not be intimidated by these kinds of extremist thugs" ("American beheaded; al-Qaida leader killed," June 19). But almost simultaneously, the U.S. State Department issued a directive that all Americans should leave Saudi Arabia. My dictionary defines intimidate as "to make timid, fill with fear; to coerce or inhibit by or as if by threats."
NEWS
June 22, 2004
THE EXECUTION of Steven Oken last week may have provided long-awaited closure for the families of his victims, but it leaves unresolved the disquieting bias in Maryland's use of the death penalty. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. made good on his campaign pledge to reinstate capital punishment without leading Maryland toward adopting a more tenable standard for applying it. Left unanswered are the doubts and questions raised by a state-commissioned study that prompted the all-too-brief moratorium on executions.
NEWS
By Paul Moore | June 20, 2004
THE E-MAILS have been arriving steadily for weeks. After a Baltimore County judge signed a death warrant for convicted murderer Steven Oken April 26, and Mr. Oken's attorneys began a series of challenges to stop his scheduled execution, no recent series of articles in The Sun has produced more impassioned responses. Whether the reactions were to stories about Mr. Oken's family or articles on death penalty opponents or stories about the feelings of the families of the three women Mr. Oken killed, the level of interest kept growing.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Alec MacGillis and Julie Bykowicz and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
After a furious legal battle that ended only in his final hour, Steven Howard Oken wrote a letter expressing remorse, smiled with a priest and submitted to his death by lethal injection last night for the 1987 rape and murder of a White Marsh newlywed. Maryland's execution of Oken, a Baltimore County pharmacist's son, at 9:18 p.m., brought chants of "justice has been served" from a crowd of 60 people gathered with relatives of murder victim Dawn Marie Garvin outside the old state penitentiary on East Madison Street in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
Steven Oken and his mother talk on the phone nearly every day, and she visits him every week. But in 17 years of conversations about such varied topics as local sports teams and world events, there's a topic that Davida Oken says she hasn't ever broached: the crimes that put her son on death row. "Why bring it up?" she asks. "I have never asked him for details, for an explanation. What good would it do?" Steven Oken, the son of a pharmacist, was 25 years old and married in November 1987 when he raped and killed three women.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.