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NEWS
December 9, 2005
Matthias J. Koehler, a retired stevedore and longtime Arnold resident, died Tuesday at Harford Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 84. Mr. Koehler, the son of German immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised in Locust Point. He attended Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he served as an Army sergeant at stateside prisoner of war camps. Mr. Koehler, who was a member of the International Longshoremen's Association, worked as a stevedore from 1937 until his retirement in 1983.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
A company serving the Severstal steel mill has applied for a state permit to bring in new equipment for processing the coke, iron ore and other raw material being shipped to and from Sparrows Point. Stevedore firm Kinder Morgan proposes to install a new screening plant for sizing coke, ore fines (small particles larger than powder-size), mill scale, and ore cleanup on the peninsula. The equipment, which could handle 200 tons an hour, would join four other units already there, according to the company's application to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
A company serving the Severstal steel mill has applied for a state permit to bring in new equipment for processing the coke, iron ore and other raw material being shipped to and from Sparrows Point. Stevedore firm Kinder Morgan proposes to install a new screening plant for sizing coke, ore fines (small particles larger than powder-size), mill scale, and ore cleanup on the peninsula. The equipment, which could handle 200 tons an hour, would join four other units already there, according to the company's application to the Maryland Department of the Environment.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2006
HOUSTON -- IN THE OUTCRY OVER WHO SHOULD RUN AMERICA'S SEAPORT TERMINALS, ONE CLEAR TREND APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN OVERLOOKED: AMERICAN COMPANIES BEGAN WITHDRAWING DECADES AGO FROM THE UNGLAMOROUS BUSINESS OF STEVEDORING, CEDING THE NOW-BOOMING INDUSTRY TO ENTERPRISES IN ASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST. So it is no accident that American companies are not in the top ranks of global terminal operators, who have ridden the coattails of the explosion in world trade. That shift has transferred growing financial influence to a handful of seafaring centers in Hong Kong, Singapore and now the emirate of Dubai.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
More than a year after it pulled out of North Locust Point Marine Terminal complaining that costs were too high, Cooper/T. Smith Inc., a nationally prominent stevedore, will return to Baltimore with a better deal from labor and the state.The Mobile, Ala.-based company began operations here in 1994, but two years later told the Maryland Port Administration that it would not renew its contract to operate the state-owned terminal and hire longshoremen to load and unload ships.North Locust Point is used primarily to handle steel, a commodity the MPA has targeted in its strategic plan to lure new cargo.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that an injured dockworker who finds a new job that pays more than he or she earned before the injury is entitled to some disability pay to offset the risk of lower earnings later.Dividing 6-3, the court said that a lingering disability resulting from an injury, combined with a future job market with diminished opportunities, could limit wage-earning for that worker.Thus, it declared, such a worker should receive temporary disability pay, at a "nominal" amount, and the chance to receive more disability pay later by proving that his or her earnings capacity had indeed fallen off.Ordinarily, an injured dockworker who finds a job that pays more than was earned before the injury is entitled to no disability pay, because such pay is meant to offset a loss in earnings resulting from the injury.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1997
The deal to bring Cooper/T. Smith back to the port of Baltimore is threatening to unravel, with dockworkers balking at extra concessions that the nationally prominent stevedoring company wants.The concessions -- reached in a tentative agreement between the Mobile, Ala.-based company and the leadership of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association -- go beyond the cuts in wages and gang size that the ILA approved last year in its local work contract.Longshoremen here say they have told Local 333 President William Schonowski that they won't accept further cuts.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Leaders of Baltimore's Longshoremen's union have rejected an offer by the Steamship Trade Association for an $18 million buyout of the program that pays Longshoremen when they are not working.The Baltimore District Council of the International Longshoremen's Association voted unanimously late last week to reject the offer to pay each member of the 1,800-member association $10,000 in exchange for eliminating the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) fund by March 1994."We didn't think it was sufficient," said Richard P. Hughes Jr., head of Local 953, which represents the 400 checkers and clerks who handle the port's paperwork.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore is close to finalizing an $18 million loan agreement that would allow the port employers' group to finance a buyout of an expensive program that pays Longshoremen when they are not working.Sources at the port say a lump sum of about $10,000 would be offered to each member of the 1,800-member Longshoremen's association under the buyout. If accepted, the plan could cut labor costs at the port by $12 million a year by 1996.But the Longshoremen are fiercely protective of the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI)
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Leaders of Baltimore's Longshoremen's union have rejected an offer by the Steamship Trade Association for an $18 million buyout of the program that pays Longshoremen when they are not working.The Baltimore District Council of the International Longshoremen's Association voted unanimously late last week to reject the offer to pay each member of the 1,800-member association $10,000 in exchange for eliminating the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) fund by March 1994."We didn't think it was sufficient," said Richard P. Hughes Jr., head of Local 953, which represents the 400 checkers and clerks who handle the port's paperwork.
NEWS
December 9, 2005
Matthias J. Koehler, a retired stevedore and longtime Arnold resident, died Tuesday at Harford Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 84. Mr. Koehler, the son of German immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised in Locust Point. He attended Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he served as an Army sergeant at stateside prisoner of war camps. Mr. Koehler, who was a member of the International Longshoremen's Association, worked as a stevedore from 1937 until his retirement in 1983.
NEWS
June 27, 2001
Stephen M. Byan Sr., 85, harbor worker, manager Stephen M. Byan Sr., who had been involved in management and labor on Baltimore's waterfront, died Saturday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of complications from lung cancer. The longtime Towson resident was 85. Mr. Byan began his career on the waterfront in 1945 loading ammunition ships. He then became a plan clerk, drafting stowage plans for Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores, which organized work gangs that loaded and unloaded ships. In 1964, he joined the stevedore company John T. Clark and Son of Maryland as vice president and general manager.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
The port of Baltimore's largest marine terminal operator, ITO Corp., will be purchased today by P&O Ports, an international port management conglomerate making its first investment in the U.S. shipping trade.The deal will transfer one of the port's largest employers to foreign ownership, but is not expected to prompt any immediate changes in ITO's Baltimore operations.The company employs several dozen people in administrative positions in Baltimore, and creates much of the work for the city's unionized Longshoremen.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1997
The deal to bring Cooper/T. Smith back to the port of Baltimore is threatening to unravel, with dockworkers balking at extra concessions that the nationally prominent stevedoring company wants.The concessions -- reached in a tentative agreement between the Mobile, Ala.-based company and the leadership of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association -- go beyond the cuts in wages and gang size that the ILA approved last year in its local work contract.Longshoremen here say they have told Local 333 President William Schonowski that they won't accept further cuts.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
More than a year after it pulled out of North Locust Point Marine Terminal complaining that costs were too high, Cooper/T. Smith Inc., a nationally prominent stevedore, will return to Baltimore with a better deal from labor and the state.The Mobile, Ala.-based company began operations here in 1994, but two years later told the Maryland Port Administration that it would not renew its contract to operate the state-owned terminal and hire longshoremen to load and unload ships.North Locust Point is used primarily to handle steel, a commodity the MPA has targeted in its strategic plan to lure new cargo.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that an injured dockworker who finds a new job that pays more than he or she earned before the injury is entitled to some disability pay to offset the risk of lower earnings later.Dividing 6-3, the court said that a lingering disability resulting from an injury, combined with a future job market with diminished opportunities, could limit wage-earning for that worker.Thus, it declared, such a worker should receive temporary disability pay, at a "nominal" amount, and the chance to receive more disability pay later by proving that his or her earnings capacity had indeed fallen off.Ordinarily, an injured dockworker who finds a job that pays more than was earned before the injury is entitled to no disability pay, because such pay is meant to offset a loss in earnings resulting from the injury.
NEWS
June 27, 2001
Stephen M. Byan Sr., 85, harbor worker, manager Stephen M. Byan Sr., who had been involved in management and labor on Baltimore's waterfront, died Saturday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of complications from lung cancer. The longtime Towson resident was 85. Mr. Byan began his career on the waterfront in 1945 loading ammunition ships. He then became a plan clerk, drafting stowage plans for Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores, which organized work gangs that loaded and unloaded ships. In 1964, he joined the stevedore company John T. Clark and Son of Maryland as vice president and general manager.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1991
Hollywood, Calif.Just as European audiences once thought of Hollywood action pictures as synonymous with Steve McQueen and Charles Bronson, Americans have come to associate quality French films with the name Gerard Depardieu.Do a quick scroll of the great French films of the past 15 years -- "Get Out Your Handkerchiefs," "The Return of Martin Guerre," "Danton" and "Jean de Florette," among them -- and you're bound to come up with plenty of Depardieu vehicles. Since making his screen debut in 1965 in a short and an unfinished adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" by Agnes Varda, the actor has appeared in, by his own estimation, "almost 80 films."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
Capping a longtime battle with Maryland port officials, Ceres Marine Terminal Inc. said yesterday that it will stop handling containers at Dundalk Marine Terminal.The Hoboken, N.J.-based international stevedore said it has been unable to reach an agreement on a new five-year lease for its 88-acre Dundalk terminal and it reiterated complaints that the Maryland Port Administration has long discriminated in its rates against Ceres, a charge upheld last summer by a federal administrative judge.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
Cooper/T. Smith, a nationally prominent stevedoring company, is closing its operation here, in the latest in a series of blows at the port of Baltimore that foreshadows a sharp downturn in the coming year.The Mobile, Ala.-based company which hires longshoremen to load and unload steamships began operations here two years ago, saying it hoped to attract cargo that would produce more jobs for the port.But recently, the company told state officials it would not renew its lease at the North Locust Point marine terminal.
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