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By Mike Giuliano | December 11, 1990
The Block is a self-contained and seedy stretch of downtown Baltimore, but last night its spirit came uptown to the Senator Theatre for the American premiere of filmmaker Steve Yeager's "On The Block."Attire for the screening was listed as "Creative Black Tie," which some insiders took as an invitation to dress like they thought pimps or hookers might. With all those fishnet stockings and red-ruffled tuxedo shirts in the crowd, it was hard to tell which people were masquerading for the evening and which were actually regulars from The Block who had bit parts in the movie.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
Steve Yeager appears caught off-guard when asked if he set out to earn a reputation as a filmmaker focusing on Baltimore's marginalized. The thought, it seems, has never really occurred to him. And yet, it's an obvious question. His first narrative film, 1990's On the Block, the story of a stripper struggling to go legit, was set and filmed in Baltimore's notorious red-light district. His biggest success, 1998's award-winning documentary Divine Trash, chronicled Baltimore's merriest bunch of misfits, the cast and crew of John Waters' reprobate 1972 masterpiece, Pink Flamingos.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 1998
"Divine Trash," Baltimore filmmaker Steve Yeager's documentary about the life and work of cult auteur John Waters, won the Filmmakers Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival on Saturday.Yeager, who directed the film and co-produced it with Cindy Miller, was still "in a state of shock" when reached by telephone just minutes after receiving the award.The Filmmakers Trophy is voted on by the dramatic and documentary directors who are in competition at Sundance. This year, 31 filmmakers voted "Divine Trash" their favorite documentary.
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitt@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
They pressed to the curb as two limos pulled up - ladies in pearls, kids waving autograph books, paparazzi holding cameras in the air. "Here they come!" yelled a voice as a door flew open. "That's my granddaughter!" cried another. And the crowd, 200 strong, buzzed as actors, directors, gaffers and key grips popped out one by one to take their bows on a gleaming red carpet. It wasn't yet 9 in the morning at the Senator Theatre, but the atmosphere was all Oscar night. The stars - budding filmmakers ages 8 to 17 - were there for the premiere of a 20-minute black-and-white thriller they had created as part of a six-week moviemaking camp last summer.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
How gloriously 1998 opened for Steve Yeager! The 53-year-old Baltimore filmmaker had made movies for decades that brought little recognition and less income. Then, in January, good fortune finally tracked him down. At Sundance, the most chichi film festival not on the French Riviera, Yeager's documentary on Baltimore guerrilla moviemaker John Waters won the Filmmaker's Trophy.Suddenly, Yeager was no longer just another anonymous documentarian. He was an anonymous documentarian with actual possibilities.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
Steve Yeager is starting production on "In Bad Taste," a follow-up to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary about the early career of John Waters. "In Bad Taste" will take up where "Divine Trash" left off, following Waters' career from "Pink Flamingos" through his new film, "Pecker.""We don't know if it's going to be 60 minutes or 90 minutes," Yeager said, "but it will air on Bravo and the Independent Film Channel starting in late January." "In Bad Taste" will follow "the same basic format as 'Divine Trash,' " according to Yeager.
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By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
While John Waters filmed "Pink Flamingos" a quarter century ago, Steve Yeager, another young moviemaker, filmed him filming "Pink Flamingos."We know what happened to Waters' footage. After its general release in 1973, "Pink Flamingos" became one the most celebrated underground movies in American film history, a depraved, subversive and altogether hilarious bit of celluloid that established Waters as one of the truly original voices in American cinema.The footage shot by Waters' friend Yeager had a more drawn-out trip to prominence.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 29, 1999
It is not supposed to be this way. Part two is never supposed to be as good as part one, especially when part one is a lifetime's labor of love that wins the 1998 Filmmaker's Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival for Best Documentary.But Baltimore filmmaker Steve Yeager has made a sequel to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary on the early career of John Waters, that is every bit its equal. "In Bad Taste," which covers Waters' career from "Female Trouble" to "Pecker," premieres tonight on cable's Independent Film Channel as part of an IFC salute to Waters that includes a showing of his classic "Polyester."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Everything you'd ever want to know about what makes John Waters so fascinating, as both filmmaker and personality, are on display in "Divine Trash," Baltimorean Steve Yeager's delightfully worshipful look at the early days of Waters' career and their lasting effect on underground and independent cinema. Yeager's film mixes footage he shot during the making of "Pink Flamingos" (for an MPT documentary that never aired) with commentary from the inhabitants of Waters' world. That includes not only the director himself and his cast of regulars (Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce)
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By Stephen Wigler | December 9, 1990
Towson State to show works by Puerto Rican artistAntonio Rodriguez was born in Puerto Rico in 1956 and began painting when he was 10. When he was 21 he joined the National Guard and spent nine years in the military, first making landscape relief maps based on aerial photographs, later teaching jungle combat techniques at the U.S. Army School of the Americas in Panama.In the mid-1980s he left the military for a career in art. He moved to Maryland and is now in the Master of Fine Arts program at Towson State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 21, 2001
My Son Divine, by Frances Milstead with Kevin Hefferman and Steve Yeager (Alyson Books, 256 pages, $18.95, paper). It would be both inhumane and inaccurate to say that that consummate Baltimore filmmaker, John Waters, invented the character Divine -- hugely prominent and entertaining star in Waters' Female Trouble, Pink Flamingos, Polyester and Hairspray. Until Waters took him up and named him, however, Divine was Harris Glenn Milstead, angelic choirboy and then somewhat effeminate and troubled teen-ager.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001
Nearly all film screenings are at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. Other venues for films and special events are the Charles Palace, 225 N. Charles St.; the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road; Heritage Cinema House, 19-21 E. North Ave.; the Bengies Drive-In, 3417 Eastern Blvd.; Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St.; and the National Aquarium, 501 E. Pratt St. FILM GUIDE THE AMERICAN ASTRONAUT (dir. Cory McAbee) This offbeat, black-and-white, musical, space-western comedy was a hit at Sundance.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 3, 2001
A lineup featuring everyone from Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb to some animated critters deemed unworthy of TV's Family Learning Channel will greet visitors to this year's third annual Maryland Film Festival. A four-day celebration of all things cinematic, this year's festival kicks off the evening of May 3 with an opening-night gala at the Senator Theatre, followed by a party at the Evergreen House on Charles Street. Some details of the festival will be announced at a news conference scheduled for this morning at the five-screen Charles Theatre, which will again serve as host for practically all of the films.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Everything you'd ever want to know about what makes John Waters so fascinating, as both filmmaker and personality, are on display in "Divine Trash," Baltimorean Steve Yeager's delightfully worshipful look at the early days of Waters' career and their lasting effect on underground and independent cinema. Yeager's film mixes footage he shot during the making of "Pink Flamingos" (for an MPT documentary that never aired) with commentary from the inhabitants of Waters' world. That includes not only the director himself and his cast of regulars (Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce)
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 1, 1999
The Inscape Theatre at Villa Julie College will produce an updated 40th anniversary production of Jack Gelber's Obie Award-winning play about drug culture, "The Connection," Nov. 11-20, and the playwright will participate in a panel discussion of the once-controversial drama on Nov. 13.When "The Connection" debuted, in a production by Judith Malina and Julian Beck's Living Theatre, it was heralded as groundbreaking. Writing in the New Yorker, critic Kenneth Tynan called it "the most exciting new play that off-Broadway has produced since the war."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 29, 1999
It is not supposed to be this way. Part two is never supposed to be as good as part one, especially when part one is a lifetime's labor of love that wins the 1998 Filmmaker's Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival for Best Documentary.But Baltimore filmmaker Steve Yeager has made a sequel to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary on the early career of John Waters, that is every bit its equal. "In Bad Taste," which covers Waters' career from "Female Trouble" to "Pecker," premieres tonight on cable's Independent Film Channel as part of an IFC salute to Waters that includes a showing of his classic "Polyester."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 21, 2001
My Son Divine, by Frances Milstead with Kevin Hefferman and Steve Yeager (Alyson Books, 256 pages, $18.95, paper). It would be both inhumane and inaccurate to say that that consummate Baltimore filmmaker, John Waters, invented the character Divine -- hugely prominent and entertaining star in Waters' Female Trouble, Pink Flamingos, Polyester and Hairspray. Until Waters took him up and named him, however, Divine was Harris Glenn Milstead, angelic choirboy and then somewhat effeminate and troubled teen-ager.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | December 10, 1990
ON THE BLOCK," the feature film produced and directed by Baltimore's Steve Yeager, will have its American premiere tonight at 6:45 at the Senator Theater, Baltimore's premier and premiere theater."On the Block," filmed in Baltimore in and around The Block, is a melodrama about a young woman who leaves home to become a stripper in a club on The Block. In time, she becomes a star dancer at Blaze Starr's 2 O'Clock Club. While there, she attracts the attention of a maniacal police lieutenant who loves the girl more than he should.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
How gloriously 1998 opened for Steve Yeager! The 53-year-old Baltimore filmmaker had made movies for decades that brought little recognition and less income. Then, in January, good fortune finally tracked him down. At Sundance, the most chichi film festival not on the French Riviera, Yeager's documentary on Baltimore guerrilla moviemaker John Waters won the Filmmaker's Trophy.Suddenly, Yeager was no longer just another anonymous documentarian. He was an anonymous documentarian with actual possibilities.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 25, 1998
MicroCineFest presents Blackchair Productions' Independent Exposure tonight at 9 p.m. at the Lodge in Highlandtown.More than 25 films will be shown, including two by local artists Alvin Ecarm and Dwayne Moser. The Lodge is at 244 S. Highland Ave. Doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is $2.Experimental filmFormer Baltimore filmmaker tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE returns on Saturday with yet another concoction of sound and images.He will preside at the Red Room at Normal's Bookstore Saturday, starting at 8: 30 p.m. Don't miss this rare chance to experience the return of one of Baltimore's most revered prodigals, at one of the city's coziest experimental film venues!
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