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By Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker and Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
Six innings, 11 runs, 14 hits and not a single strikeout. That was Steve Reich's pitching line in 1996 for an Orioles farm team in the only two starts of what was a trying career by standard baseball measurement. But Reich's life - which ended earlier this week when his Army helicopter crashed in Afghanistan - defied any such summation. He was, according to former teammates and others who knew him, a gifted, courageous, honorable and highly motivated credit to his family, town and country.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
With a name as, um, loaded as Loadbang , you just know you're in for something different from the musicians who perform under that moniker. The make-up of the New York-based ensemble is unusual enough -- voice, bass clarinet, trumpet and trombone. The group has inspired an unusual repertoire to match. I only heard the first half of Loadbang's concert for valuable Evolution Contemporary Music Series at An die Musik , but that contained a full dose of intriguing, not to mention challenging, scores.
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By Tim Smith | November 15, 2001
Steve Reich Steve Reich: Triple Quartet and other works. Kronos Quartet; Dominic Frasca, electric guitarist; and others. (Nonesuch 79546-2) Pundits who predicted that the musical style known as minimalism would quickly fade away have a lot of repeated chords to eat. Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams - the minimalist holy trinity - are still going strong, and their ideas about limited harmonic motion and rhythmic reiteration continue to influence many...
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker and Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
Six innings, 11 runs, 14 hits and not a single strikeout. That was Steve Reich's pitching line in 1996 for an Orioles farm team in the only two starts of what was a trying career by standard baseball measurement. But Reich's life - which ended earlier this week when his Army helicopter crashed in Afghanistan - defied any such summation. He was, according to former teammates and others who knew him, a gifted, courageous, honorable and highly motivated credit to his family, town and country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
With a name as, um, loaded as Loadbang , you just know you're in for something different from the musicians who perform under that moniker. The make-up of the New York-based ensemble is unusual enough -- voice, bass clarinet, trumpet and trombone. The group has inspired an unusual repertoire to match. I only heard the first half of Loadbang's concert for valuable Evolution Contemporary Music Series at An die Musik , but that contained a full dose of intriguing, not to mention challenging, scores.
SPORTS
By Kevin Paul Dupont and Kevin Paul Dupont,Boston Globe | November 14, 1993
If the National Hockey League had its All-Star Game this weekend, it would have to go on without stars Steve Yzerman, Pavel Bure, Mario Lemieux and Eric Lindros.Nice week. For those of you out there who already have spent your hockey pool winnings, it's beginning to look like a long, costly winter.Yzerman was down with a herniated cervical disk and Bure with a pulled groin.Then, come Thursday night, it was clear that Lemieux (bad back) would be pulling out at least until the new year and Lindros, after locking legs with Bill Guerin, would be sidelined three to six weeks.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | June 1, 2002
A series of free lectures will help prepare audiences for the inaugural New Chamber Festival Baltimore, an extraordinary three-day sampling of the past 100 years or so of string quartet repertoire starting June 20. The lectures, given by popular Peabody Institute professor and composer Elam Ray Sprenkle, will be held on three consecutive Tuesdays, beginning this Tuesday. Sprenkle will look at the evolution of string quartet writing in the 20th century. The first topic is "1890-1914: The Decline of the Common Practice, or the `Big Crack-Up.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | October 5, 1994
The second showcase of local modern dance companies, seen at the Baltimore Museum of Art Saturday night, was a notch above last year's endeavor in both professionalism and choreographic invention.The three companies that performed were the Baltimore Dance Collaborative, Nancy Havlik's Dance Performance Group and Chris Dohse/Toothmother.One of the stronger works on the program of nine dances was "Vow: A Line Dance for Women, Black Dresses and Popular Culture" by Baltimore Dance Collaborative's Kathleen Murphy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 12, 1994
Until last night's performance in Kraushaar Auditorium, it had been perhaps a year since I had heard Anne Harrigan conduct the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra. Sometimes it takes such a period of time to appreciate progress.In any case, Harrigan gave the best performances I've heard her give -- a lovely reading of Mendelssohn's "Italian" Symphony and an equally fine accompaniment to pianist Stephen Prutsman in Mozart's Concerto No. 15 (K. 450).The forward thrust in Mendelssohn's "Italian" was substantially different from the taut, somewhat unyielding approach that used to be a feature of the work of this conductor.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
Michael Torke is a 30-year-old American composer of classical music whose work seems to fit the times: it is often energetic, youthful, clever and unconcerned with lasting themes.His music is quick, sometimes even agitated, rushing around in fragments, repeating snippets of melodies in driving beats and exuding originality despite hints of diverse sources. Torke's head is full of sharp ideas and he has fun with a variety of instruments.His music created a stir here last year. Whether you want to hear the same Torke works over and over again in a recording is another matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 15, 2001
Steve Reich Steve Reich: Triple Quartet and other works. Kronos Quartet; Dominic Frasca, electric guitarist; and others. (Nonesuch 79546-2) Pundits who predicted that the musical style known as minimalism would quickly fade away have a lot of repeated chords to eat. Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams - the minimalist holy trinity - are still going strong, and their ideas about limited harmonic motion and rhythmic reiteration continue to influence many...
SPORTS
By Kevin Paul Dupont and Kevin Paul Dupont,Boston Globe | November 14, 1993
If the National Hockey League had its All-Star Game this weekend, it would have to go on without stars Steve Yzerman, Pavel Bure, Mario Lemieux and Eric Lindros.Nice week. For those of you out there who already have spent your hockey pool winnings, it's beginning to look like a long, costly winter.Yzerman was down with a herniated cervical disk and Bure with a pulled groin.Then, come Thursday night, it was clear that Lemieux (bad back) would be pulling out at least until the new year and Lindros, after locking legs with Bill Guerin, would be sidelined three to six weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Producers and artists are quick to mythologize their roles in history.  J. Robbins would rather work.  As the frontman of the '90s post-punk band Jawbox, J. Robbins was a self-described “gung-ho touring maniac.” To the Silver Spring native, signing to the major label Atlantic Records and having the group's video for “Savory” played on MTV were accomplishments, but none were as rewarding as seeing the world. “I just loved to tour because I'd be like, 'Look where the band took me - we made it to the West Coast!
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2001
The Kronos Quartet has been challenging the conventions of chamber music and the concert hall for nearly 30 years now. Most of those conventions are still standing, and a lot of what once was terribly radical in a typical Kronos program now seems quite tame. But the ensemble still has a niche and a following, still has a lot to offer those seeking a taste of novelty. On Sunday evening, presented as the season-closer by the Shriver Hall Concert Series, the quartet offered an eclectic sampling of repertoire, most of it fashioned specifically for Kronos.
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