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By John Steadman | May 6, 1994
That Steve Palermo responded to the call of trouble didn't cause him even a remote reason to ponder the circumstance. Vigilance and courage signaled his attention. Go help. He did.There were two waitresses being robbed that July night in 1991 on the parking lot outside a Dallas restaurant and he had no time for asking questions. Rush to them as quickly as possible. Drive off the attackers. Lend assistance. Do what had to be done.He was doing precisely that when he took a shot in the back from a hoodlum's gun. A flash of fire.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
NEW YORK -- New York Yankees manager Joe Torre knew he wasn't going to get much sympathy after the Cleveland Indians parlayed a controversial play into a series-squaring victory in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series on Wednesday night. His club has had its share of breaks over the past few years -- most notably a very famous miscall in the first game of their last ALCS appearance.Twelve-year-old Jeffrey Maier gave them a big assist in 1996, reaching out of the right-field bleachers to snatch a fly ball away from Orioles outfielder Tony Tarasco and turn an apparent flyout by shortstop Derek Jeter into a game-tying home run.Apparently, what goes around really does come around, even if it takes a couple of years to arrive.
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SPORTS
July 13, 1994
A golf tournament to benefit the Steve Palermo Foundation For Spinal Cord Injuries will be held Aug. 8 at the Chestnut Ridge Golf & Country Club. A four-man scramble format will be used with a shotgun start at 1 p.m.Palermo, the American League umpire who was shot while trying to prevent a robbery three years ago, will serve as master of ceremonies for the event, which is being sponsored by the Timonium restaurant that bears his name. There will be long drive and closest-to-the-pin contests, with a car offered as the prize for a hole in one on two designated holes.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
There was a time -- not so long ago -- when baseball was largely a game of King of the Hill. Whoever stood tallest on the mound was all but certain to have the best team, and it was a lot easier to stand taller then, because the mound was 5 inches higher than it is today.Now, with offensive production booming and tentative pitchers slowing the game to a crawl, Major League Baseball is close to adopting a rule change that would boost the mound closer to where it was when pitching was pre-eminent.
SPORTS
March 29, 1992
Small-market woesJohn Eisenberg's column on the economic woes of small-market baseball cities was right on the money. As an Orioles fan, the not-too-distant future looks bleak.Fans who advocate huge player salaries had better wise up. Owners don't have bottomless bankrolls.What they have are revenue-generated markets. It's the fans' money that pays the players: money for tickets, merchandising, and product consumption (which pays for the advertising, which pays for the television rights).
SPORTS
By Randy Galloway and Randy Galloway,Dallas Morning News | June 13, 1995
I've been hot on the trail of something big, but up until last week, I just thought I had a great idea. Now, however, the proof has arrived. By gosh, I do have the answer to one of baseball's biggest questions.(By they way, does anyone have the name of a good orthopedic guy? I'm afraid I've just blown out a rotator cuff patting myself on the back.)Steve Palermo for commissioner.See there, brilliant. Simply brilliant. And very sensible, too.If you still consider yourself a baseball fan, and you were asked to name the three things most lacking in the game today, here's a bet your list would read:(1)
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 30, 1993
Every day Steve Palermo knows pain and trauma but never recrimination or self-pity. He is a true, honest-to-God hero. Revere the name. His presence creates a feeling of awe within those around him. This is a man of courage and, of course, the kind of character that carries a glorious, even mystical, wonder.To his profound credit and unwavering religious beliefs, Palermo doesn't look to the heavens searching for an answer and asking, "Why me, Lord?" He accepts the burden put upon him in this modern sequel to the Good Samaritan, wronged while on a mission of mercy.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994
The person with the most difficult job in baseball might be Steve Palermo. The former American League umpire recently was appointed to lead a study to crack the mystery of why baseball games are getting longer. Palermo has gathered information for six weeks and expects to present his findings to baseball club owners. He spoke recently with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: One of baseball's main selling points has been that there's no game clock. Why the big concern about games that stretch on for three hours or longer?
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | November 5, 1993
Maryland's most prominent real estate and waterfront restoration planner, Jim Rouse, will be rubbing elbows with national celebs like Alan Alda, Alec Baldwin, Judy Blume, Garth Brooks, HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, outgoing New York City Mayor David Dinkins, Mike Mills, Roger Rosenblatt, and Kathleen Turner at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Sunday night.But it's Rouse who will be the center of attention. He has been selected by People for the American Way to receive the group's "Spirit of Liberty Award," for his lifelong support of tolerance and diversity.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
There was a time -- not so long ago -- when baseball was largely a game of King of the Hill. Whoever stood tallest on the mound was all but certain to have the best team, and it was a lot easier to stand taller then, because the mound was 5 inches higher than it is today.Now, with offensive production booming and tentative pitchers slowing the game to a crawl, Major League Baseball is close to adopting a rule change that would boost the mound closer to where it was when pitching was pre-eminent.
SPORTS
By Randy Galloway and Randy Galloway,Dallas Morning News | June 13, 1995
I've been hot on the trail of something big, but up until last week, I just thought I had a great idea. Now, however, the proof has arrived. By gosh, I do have the answer to one of baseball's biggest questions.(By they way, does anyone have the name of a good orthopedic guy? I'm afraid I've just blown out a rotator cuff patting myself on the back.)Steve Palermo for commissioner.See there, brilliant. Simply brilliant. And very sensible, too.If you still consider yourself a baseball fan, and you were asked to name the three things most lacking in the game today, here's a bet your list would read:(1)
SPORTS
July 13, 1994
A golf tournament to benefit the Steve Palermo Foundation For Spinal Cord Injuries will be held Aug. 8 at the Chestnut Ridge Golf & Country Club. A four-man scramble format will be used with a shotgun start at 1 p.m.Palermo, the American League umpire who was shot while trying to prevent a robbery three years ago, will serve as master of ceremonies for the event, which is being sponsored by the Timonium restaurant that bears his name. There will be long drive and closest-to-the-pin contests, with a car offered as the prize for a hole in one on two designated holes.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994
The person with the most difficult job in baseball might be Steve Palermo. The former American League umpire recently was appointed to lead a study to crack the mystery of why baseball games are getting longer. Palermo has gathered information for six weeks and expects to present his findings to baseball club owners. He spoke recently with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: One of baseball's main selling points has been that there's no game clock. Why the big concern about games that stretch on for three hours or longer?
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 6, 1994
That Steve Palermo responded to the call of trouble didn't cause him even a remote reason to ponder the circumstance. Vigilance and courage signaled his attention. Go help. He did.There were two waitresses being robbed that July night in 1991 on the parking lot outside a Dallas restaurant and he had no time for asking questions. Rush to them as quickly as possible. Drive off the attackers. Lend assistance. Do what had to be done.He was doing precisely that when he took a shot in the back from a hoodlum's gun. A flash of fire.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | November 5, 1993
Maryland's most prominent real estate and waterfront restoration planner, Jim Rouse, will be rubbing elbows with national celebs like Alan Alda, Alec Baldwin, Judy Blume, Garth Brooks, HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, outgoing New York City Mayor David Dinkins, Mike Mills, Roger Rosenblatt, and Kathleen Turner at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Sunday night.But it's Rouse who will be the center of attention. He has been selected by People for the American Way to receive the group's "Spirit of Liberty Award," for his lifelong support of tolerance and diversity.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 30, 1993
Every day Steve Palermo knows pain and trauma but never recrimination or self-pity. He is a true, honest-to-God hero. Revere the name. His presence creates a feeling of awe within those around him. This is a man of courage and, of course, the kind of character that carries a glorious, even mystical, wonder.To his profound credit and unwavering religious beliefs, Palermo doesn't look to the heavens searching for an answer and asking, "Why me, Lord?" He accepts the burden put upon him in this modern sequel to the Good Samaritan, wronged while on a mission of mercy.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1992
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Until taking a gunshot in the spine last summer, Steve Palermo was dedicated to umpiring. Now he's dedicated to umpiring again.Palermo, 41, works in physical therapy toward resuming his American League career. His legs were paralyzed initially, but now he can walk with crutches.Although he has no idea when he'll be able to umpire again, Palermo a resident of the Kansas City area was his typically lively self at Royals Stadium during Saturday night's Detroit Tigers-Royals game.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
NEW YORK -- New York Yankees manager Joe Torre knew he wasn't going to get much sympathy after the Cleveland Indians parlayed a controversial play into a series-squaring victory in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series on Wednesday night. His club has had its share of breaks over the past few years -- most notably a very famous miscall in the first game of their last ALCS appearance.Twelve-year-old Jeffrey Maier gave them a big assist in 1996, reaching out of the right-field bleachers to snatch a fly ball away from Orioles outfielder Tony Tarasco and turn an apparent flyout by shortstop Derek Jeter into a game-tying home run.Apparently, what goes around really does come around, even if it takes a couple of years to arrive.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1992
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Until taking a gunshot in the spine last summer, Steve Palermo was dedicated to umpiring. Now he's dedicated to umpiring again.Palermo, 41, works in physical therapy toward resuming his American League career. His legs were paralyzed initially, but now he can walk with crutches.Although he has no idea when he'll be able to umpire again, Palermo a resident of the Kansas City area was his typically lively self at Royals Stadium during Saturday night's Detroit Tigers-Royals game.
SPORTS
March 29, 1992
Small-market woesJohn Eisenberg's column on the economic woes of small-market baseball cities was right on the money. As an Orioles fan, the not-too-distant future looks bleak.Fans who advocate huge player salaries had better wise up. Owners don't have bottomless bankrolls.What they have are revenue-generated markets. It's the fans' money that pays the players: money for tickets, merchandising, and product consumption (which pays for the advertising, which pays for the television rights).
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