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Steve Madden

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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- The last thing Steve Madden needs is more caffeine.In his midtown New York showroom, the disheveled, ultra-now shoe designer darts from phone, to generic Starbucks drink, to client, to generic Starbucks drink, to bathroom, to generic Starbucks drink, occasionally pausing to calm himself by singing "Stand By Your Man.""The Attention Deficit Disorder part of the day is happening now," the 40-year-old Madden says in his raspy Long Island accent.It's market day, a day for him to check up on the progress of his products, and for local retailers to review the new lines, do some buying and share some gossip.
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By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 1999
Turning a new page in teen magazinesCosmogirl, a new teen magazine from the people who bring you Cosmopolitan, has just launched its introductory issue. To see how it compared to its teen-targeting counterparts, we turned to the expertise of two Baltimore-area teens.Jenny Bowman, 13, of Towson, says Cosmogirl beats out many of its compet-itors. "It has stuff a lot of other teen magazines don't have," she says, "like the page where you can find out your own personal style." This Internet-savvy teen also discovered the magazine's Web site (www.
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FEATURES
September 13, 1996
The shoes on the Today front yesterday were incorrectly identified. The shoes are, (from top): Stuart Weitzman brown croc loafer, $195, at Hess Shoes. Red lizard by Pappagallo, $55, at Hecht's. Burgundy patent by Two Lips, $60, at Nordstrom. Mint suede by Steve Madden, $60, at Nordstrom. Black suede chunk loafer by Berne Mev, $110, at Joanna Gray. Red/black spectator by Valerie Stevens, $50, at Hecht's.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/13/96
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- The last thing Steve Madden needs is more caffeine.In his midtown New York showroom, the disheveled, ultra-now shoe designer darts from phone, to generic Starbucks drink, to client, to generic Starbucks drink, to bathroom, to generic Starbucks drink, occasionally pausing to calm himself by singing "Stand By Your Man.""The Attention Deficit Disorder part of the day is happening now," the 40-year-old Madden says in his raspy Long Island accent.It's market day, a day for him to check up on the progress of his products, and for local retailers to review the new lines, do some buying and share some gossip.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 1999
Turning a new page in teen magazinesCosmogirl, a new teen magazine from the people who bring you Cosmopolitan, has just launched its introductory issue. To see how it compared to its teen-targeting counterparts, we turned to the expertise of two Baltimore-area teens.Jenny Bowman, 13, of Towson, says Cosmogirl beats out many of its compet-itors. "It has stuff a lot of other teen magazines don't have," she says, "like the page where you can find out your own personal style." This Internet-savvy teen also discovered the magazine's Web site (www.
FEATURES
By Lisa Skolnik and Lisa Skolnik,Chicago Tribune | October 14, 1999
Just gotta show off the coolest look? Here are the freshest trends from some of the heaviest brands. But remember: New soles don't have to cost big bucks, so keep your eyes open for budget-minded copies.HIGH TOPS: Towering soles make these new Steve Madden shoes sky-high (or almost, that is). From top: Broker, the toggle loafer, Feather, the Mary Jane, and Joey, the green suede loafer, all cost about $69. Look for them online at www.stevemadden.com or call (800) 762-3336 for store locations.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | February 7, 2012
If you think the name Boliwalou sounds like a fantastical place in a Dr. Seuss book, you're not far from the truth. It is a made-up word, inspired by the famous children's author, but it's not a place; it's a philosophy, says Cris Thompson, owner of the Boliwalou resale shop in the Kings Contrivance Village Center. “It means 'to express yourself,'” says Thompson, a Columbia resident who gave up a career as a child and adolescent therapist to help women find themselves in a different way, through the power of clothes.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | March 9, 1997
Easy on the stylingRalph Lauren, who knows how to tweak a predictable menswear formula in an interesting way. At his spring show, instead of belting models in traditional webbing, he ran preppy ties through belt loops and called it fashion.The look is unstudied and relaxed, with a hint of white ducks and Madras jackets and the easy life of summer cottages that Ralph suggests so well. It's an idea to borrow, and a way to recycle the old Frank Leonard ties that linger in grandad's closet. The shell necklace is more problematic.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2008
ABBY INGLE, A FOOT- wear buyer for Baltimore's own sports- apparel giant Under Armour, knows how to go toe to toe with fashion. Shoes are one of her personal fashion weaknesses, but not the kind she buys for business. This 26-year-old Elkridge resident keeps herself sleek and chic in ballet flats and heels, along with jeans for every occasion. Age: 26 Residence: Elkridge Job: Footwear buyer at Under Armour Self-described style: "Classic. Very simple." The look: Yellow three-quarter-length sleeve cotton T-shirt.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | September 2, 2007
Necessity, they say, is the mother of invention. In Alexandra Arminger's case, it also is the maker of fabulous fashion. Arminger borrowed this beautifully wild Pucci-esque dress from a friend, but needed something to wear underneath to make it appropriate for greeting clients at the Owings Mills salon where she works as a receptionist. Instead of grabbing a boring tank top, Arminger pulled on a funky fishnet top. That one act of fashion-forwardness took this dress from great to g-r-r-reat!
FEATURES
September 13, 1996
The shoes on the Today front yesterday were incorrectly identified. The shoes are, (from top): Stuart Weitzman brown croc loafer, $195, at Hess Shoes. Red lizard by Pappagallo, $55, at Hecht's. Burgundy patent by Two Lips, $60, at Nordstrom. Mint suede by Steve Madden, $60, at Nordstrom. Black suede chunk loafer by Berne Mev, $110, at Joanna Gray. Red/black spectator by Valerie Stevens, $50, at Hecht's.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/13/96
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 27, 1995
Designers are playing the '60s. It was the decade of Jacqueline Kennedy, the grandest diva of American style. It was also the decade of the Beatles and the British invasion of pop music and fashion. Today's dressing is a harmonious blend of those seemingly dissonant strains.Call it madame meets mod -- a practiced look. The midriff isaccented in dressmaker shaping or cropped at the waist in boxy little jackets that once defined the ladylike matinee turnout.The menswear influence remains strong; however it is Carnaby Street and not Wall Street where fashion now strolls.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | September 12, 1996
The shoes on the Today front yesterday were incorrectly identified. The shoes are, (from top): Stuart Weitzman brown croc loafer, $195, at Hess Shoes. Red lizard by Pappagallo, $55, at Hecht's. Burgundy patent by Two Lips, $60, at Nordstrom. Mint suede by Steve Madden, $60, at Nordstrom. Black suede chunk loafer by Berne Mev, $110, at Joanna Gray. Red/black spectator by Valerie Stevens, $50, at Hecht's.The Sun regrets the error.Will it be a snaffle or a ruffle this fashion season? It will be a snaffle, the part of a horse's mouthpiece which consists of two bars joined by a ring.
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