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Gus G. Sentementes | April 12, 2012
I'm getting psyched to meet and introduce Walter Isaacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs biography, at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this Saturday ! Are you going? It's an all day affair for book lovers. Or, if you want to just see Walter, come by at 3 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Branch . I read Isaacson's book last fall and it was a big influence, in a very personal way, on my life. As some of you know, I've been plotting my own little startup venture, with an app called NestPix.com . Reading about all the hurdles that Jobs overcame -- multiple bouts with catastrophic failure -- and learning about how he learned to trust his intuitution...Well, this was a message delivered at the right time for me. Steve Jobs didn't strike me as a man who had a lot of self-doubt.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  LAPIDARY If you want to praise a piece of prose as precise, clear, and glowing jewel-like, a word to reach for is lapidary .  From the Latin  lapis , "stone," lapidary  (pronounced LAP-uh-der-ee) means displaying elegance, polish, and craftsmanlike precision, like an inscription on stone.  You may recall Samual Johnson's remark about the accuracy of epitaphs: "In lapidary inscriptions a man is not on oath.
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NEWS
October 7, 2011
I am almost 80 years old. My husband and I have owned Macs from the very first one. It is my life line. I email back and forth with friends and family, search the Web for all kinds of information and keep up with what is happening locally, nationally and internationally through my Mac. Steve Jobs changed my life, and I appreciate all that he did. Pat Elliott, Baltimore
NEWS
March 21, 2013
"This kid was just as imaginative and is just as adventurous as Steve Jobs was at the age of 7," said the attorney for the boy suspended from school after he nibbled a gun-shaped Pop-Tart ("Appeal filed in 7-year-old's suspension over pastry," March 19). I really don't believe Steve Jobs ever bit a pastry into the shape of a gun and then pointed it at other students. What the boy's attorney, and more importantly, his parents should be doing is sitting down with the 7-year-old and asking him what was going through his mind when he made the shape of a gun and pointed it at his classmates as if it were a game.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 6, 2011
Apple co-founder Steve Jobs passed away on Wednesday. When the news broke in the evening, the social media set did its thing, taking to Twitter and Facebook to mourn his death as if he were a close relative, post inspirational quotes from Jobs, and compare him to Einstein, Edison, Carnegie and even the late, great Jesus . I can't (stealing a phrase from my buddy Kevin Cowherd) keep my fat, little fingers off my new iPhone. But I was surprised by the strong reactions people had to the death of the innovator behind many great Apple products . I'm also surprised the blogosphere is having so much fun with an innocent Tweet by Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher, who asked his 75,000 followers on Wednesday night to clue him in on who Steve Jobs was. Oher posted the message to his Twitter feed using his iPhone , of course.
NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | October 6, 2011
There has been a great outpouring since the death of Steve Jobs on Wednesday. This is only fitting. Mr. Jobs was responsible for many great outpourings over the past three decades - including my own. In 1984, when I went off to college, I took along the fancy typewriter that had gotten me through high school: a Brother Correctronic with the magical ability to remember - and erase - an entire line of typing. Erasing a regrettable sentence on the Correctronic was simply a matter of pressing a button.
NEWS
October 8, 2011
Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who died this week after a long battle with cancer, is rightfully being lauded as a visionary, a person who brought technology seamlessly into our lives and who could all but see the future in his development of new ideas that would change whole industries. But for all the cutting-edge sleekness of the Apple he envisioned, there was something decidedly old-fashioned about him. At a time when corporate executives are being picketed by an encampment on Wall Street, Mr. Jobs stood apart.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
In 2005, Steve Jobs told the graduating students at Stanford University that the secret that defined his every action, decision and creation was the belief that one should "not be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking" ("Steve Jobs: the creator's creator," Oct. 7). Yet that did not make him a visionary but rather shortsighted and narcissistic, for it fails to honor the debt we all owe to those who went before us, those who laid the groundwork for progress and who challenged us with their magnificent ideas and achievements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Few nonfiction writers think bigger than Walter Isaacson, who has taken on subjects like Henry Kissinger, Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. But when Apple founder Steve Jobs invited him in 2004 to write a complete and frank biography, Isaacson held back. He figured Jobs was in midcareer, so a book was premature. He had finished with Franklin the year before and was still grappling with Einstein. "My initial reaction," Isaacson says in "Steve Jobs," the biography he began five years later, "was to wonder, half-jokingly, whether he saw himself as the natural successor in that sequence.
BUSINESS
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,The Boston Globe | January 10, 2007
Apple Computer Inc.'s chief executive, Steven P. Jobs, captivated an audience of thousands at San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center yesterday as he unveiled Apple's newest products at the company's annual Macworld trade show. But this year's show-and-tell is more keenly anticipated than most. Some industry-watchers think the appearance could be Jobs' last as Apple struggles to deal with the backdating of stock options. Apple stock rose nearly 5 percent last month after the board issued a report from a panel led by former Vice President Al Gore that concluded Jobs had broken no laws.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | October 2, 2012
The debates, starting Wednesday night, are Mitt Romney's last chance to turn around his campaign. He must communicate what he has failed to convey so far: his vision to give Americans a better life and deal with tough challenges, like the financial meltdown and the Arab Spring, that are unforeseeable when presidents are chosen. Mr. Romney made his fortune in private equity. To most Americans, the benefits of such activities are much more difficult to grasp than the work of, say, Steve Jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
For his fifth album, Citizen Cope needed "a shot of optimism," so he wrote its opening song, "One Lovely Day. " The sparse, acoustic guitar-driven track finds its narrator trying to persuade a woman to come with him "to where there ain't no more pain. " The song, which became the title track for the July release, lacks a happy ending, but it's more about the desire to find a utopia away from a corrupt world. "Every time you do a record, you have the opportunity to spread some love," said Cope, who plays the Silopanna Music Festival in Annapolis on Saturday.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 18, 2012
The great news for Baltimore and Maryland is that the University of Maryland Baltimore County's president, Freeman A. Hrabowski III, was named to Time's annual Top 100 influential people today. Another person on the list : Walter Isaacson, known recently and most famously as the official biographer of Steve Jobs. Mr. Isaacson was in Baltimore on Saturday, where he was a featured speaker at the CityLit Festival. I had the pleasure of introducing him to a crowd of hundreds.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 12, 2012
I'm getting psyched to meet and introduce Walter Isaacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs biography, at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this Saturday ! Are you going? It's an all day affair for book lovers. Or, if you want to just see Walter, come by at 3 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Branch . I read Isaacson's book last fall and it was a big influence, in a very personal way, on my life. As some of you know, I've been plotting my own little startup venture, with an app called NestPix.com . Reading about all the hurdles that Jobs overcame -- multiple bouts with catastrophic failure -- and learning about how he learned to trust his intuitution...Well, this was a message delivered at the right time for me. Steve Jobs didn't strike me as a man who had a lot of self-doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Few nonfiction writers think bigger than Walter Isaacson, who has taken on subjects like Henry Kissinger, Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. But when Apple founder Steve Jobs invited him in 2004 to write a complete and frank biography, Isaacson held back. He figured Jobs was in midcareer, so a book was premature. He had finished with Franklin the year before and was still grappling with Einstein. "My initial reaction," Isaacson says in "Steve Jobs," the biography he began five years later, "was to wonder, half-jokingly, whether he saw himself as the natural successor in that sequence.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Apple CEO Steve Jobs was an inspiring man who changed the we look at technology. Virtually every project he created was a world-class success. His 2007 iPod changed the way we listen to music; his iPhone put a computer in customers' hand. And his iPad notebook bids fair to make laptop computers obsolete. Mr. Jobs made the lives of millions of people easier. He will go down in history as one of the greatest technology innovators and product designers of our time. Jeffrey Lowe
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | January 18, 2007
When we returned from vacation Sunday night and I looked back over 10 days' worth of technology headlines, the one item that struck me was the announcement of a new, $500 gadget called the "iPhone." Didn't I review that thing a while back? I thought. A few clicks on the controls of the Internet Time Machine proved I wasn't dreaming. I did review a gadget called iPhone - a decade ago. But lack of originality isn't the only reason that Apple's long-awaited entry into the cell phone business might not be the colossal, lifestyle-changing hit the company created with the iPod.
BUSINESS
By Lee Gomes and Lee Gomes,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 1, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- After five years of expectations that rose, then fell, then rose again, Steve Jobs says his Next Inc. is strong enough that he's considering taking it public.Speaking to reporters at a trade show in New York, Mr. Jobs said for the first time that he wants to issue stock for Next. He said that it could happen within 18 months -- eons in the deal-a-month world of corporate finance.Mr. Jobs also said that he expects workstation sales at Next to continue to pick up and that they will reach $60 million this quarter -- enough to be a small factor in the market but still only about 8 percent of what industry leader Sun Microsystems Inc. sells.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
Steve Job's death had the same impact on the younger generation of today that the death of John F. Kennedy had on a previous generation While it is difficult to quantify the impact of one person on an entire generation, it is safe to say that the passing of Steve Jobs had the same impact on the younger generation of today that the death of John F. Kennedy had on a previous generation. For those who witnessed both events, we will always remember where we were and what we were doing when both of these heroes passed on. Paul Jankovic, Bethany Beach, Del.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
In 2005, Steve Jobs told the graduating students at Stanford University that the secret that defined his every action, decision and creation was the belief that one should "not be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking" ("Steve Jobs: the creator's creator," Oct. 7). Yet that did not make him a visionary but rather shortsighted and narcissistic, for it fails to honor the debt we all owe to those who went before us, those who laid the groundwork for progress and who challenged us with their magnificent ideas and achievements.
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