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By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | July 16, 2000
Everyone who knows Steve Geppi knows he's something of a showman, an entertaining guy who breaks into song at the slightest provocation. Though he's chairman and founder of Diamond Comics Distributors, owner and publisher of Baltimore Magazine and a minority owner of the Baltimore Orioles, Steve is perhaps best known for his singing among his family and friends. At his wedding to longtime companion Mindy Stout July 8, Steve sang what was likely the most important song of his life. In a moment that hadn't been rehearsed or listed in the ceremony program, he recited traditional wedding vows and then grasped Mindy's hands and broke into song.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 22, 2013
It's hard to imagine that gay marriage and Superman could be wrapped into a controversy, but that's happening across the nation as  DC Comics launches a new line of comic books featuring Clark Kent's alter ego. One of the authors signed on for the upcoming "Adventures of Superman" series is Orson Scott Card, who wrote the popular Ender series. He certainly has science fiction cred, but his views opposing gay marriage have caused some bookstores to boycott his newest works and have triggered a petition drive.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Mike "Toodie" Geppi likes to tell the story of how his kid brother once passed up a chance to buy a Superman No. 1 comic -- now worth at least $65,000 in mint condition -- from the proprietor of a store near their home in Little Italy."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore | February 21, 2011
Digital entertainment has shaken the retail industry, shuttering your local brick-and-mortar record store, bookseller and video rental outlets. Could the neighborhood comic book shop be next? Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. hopes not. The Timonium company is the country's largest distributor of comics to about 2,700 small retailers. It has been fighting the same forces — online sales, changing consumer habits and even digital piracy — that are pushing other retailers to the brink.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 9, 2002
Back in November 1939, the artists responsible for the first issue of Marvel Comics were paid about $15 a page for their efforts. The book itself, which introduced the Human Torch and Sub-Mariner to the world, could be purchased at newsstands for a dime. What a difference 63 years can make. Last week, a nearly flawless copy of that magazine, in pretty much the same condition as the day it came off the presses, sold for an astonishing $350,000 M-y a new record for a single comic book. "In many ways, I feel like I sold it way too cheap," said Steve Geppi, president of Baltimore-based Diamond Comic Distributors.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Baltimore man-about-town Steve Geppi gets a moment in the national spotlight on cable tonight. From tiny comic books do mighty empires grow.* "The Cosby Show" (5 p.m.-5:30 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- It ain't "I Spy," but it's as close as you'll get these days: Robert Culp, Bill Cosby's fellow spy from 1965 to 1968, shows up as the Huxtables' dinner host.* "Before They Were Stars" (8:30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- See David Letterman during his days as an Indiana weatherman, where he probably predicted hail the size of canned hams.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 22, 2013
It's hard to imagine that gay marriage and Superman could be wrapped into a controversy, but that's happening across the nation as  DC Comics launches a new line of comic books featuring Clark Kent's alter ego. One of the authors signed on for the upcoming "Adventures of Superman" series is Orson Scott Card, who wrote the popular Ender series. He certainly has science fiction cred, but his views opposing gay marriage have caused some bookstores to boycott his newest works and have triggered a petition drive.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2010
W hat turns the B&O Railroad Museum's roundhouse into a barn? A whole lot of rain. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation planned for its annual Spring Swing party to be inside a Glyndon barn. But spring showers turned the barn's grounds into a muddy mess. The shindig's locale changed, but the evening's theme - "barn chic" - went on as planned. Several hundred guests milled around the old locomotives in their best farmhand bib-and-tucker, including all of the evening's co-chairs: Courtney and William Toomey , Amy and Mark Lavelle , Jamie and Charles Seymour , and Suzanne and Stuart Amos . Steve Geppi , Diamond Comics CEO, arrived in jeans and a sports jacket.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2010
W hat turns the B&O Railroad Museum's roundhouse into a barn? A whole lot of rain. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation planned for its annual Spring Swing party to be inside a Glyndon barn. But spring showers turned the barn's grounds into a muddy mess. The shindig's locale changed, but the evening's theme - "barn chic" - went on as planned. Several hundred guests milled around the old locomotives in their best farmhand bib-and-tucker, including all of the evening's co-chairs: Courtney and William Toomey , Amy and Mark Lavelle , Jamie and Charles Seymour , and Suzanne and Stuart Amos . Steve Geppi , Diamond Comics CEO, arrived in jeans and a sports jacket.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 9, 2002
Back in November 1939, the artists responsible for the first issue of Marvel Comics were paid about $15 a page for their efforts. The book itself, which introduced the Human Torch and Sub-Mariner to the world, could be purchased at newsstands for a dime. What a difference 63 years can make. Last week, a nearly flawless copy of that magazine, in pretty much the same condition as the day it came off the presses, sold for an astonishing $350,000 M-y a new record for a single comic book. "In many ways, I feel like I sold it way too cheap," said Steve Geppi, president of Baltimore-based Diamond Comic Distributors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | July 16, 2000
Everyone who knows Steve Geppi knows he's something of a showman, an entertaining guy who breaks into song at the slightest provocation. Though he's chairman and founder of Diamond Comics Distributors, owner and publisher of Baltimore Magazine and a minority owner of the Baltimore Orioles, Steve is perhaps best known for his singing among his family and friends. At his wedding to longtime companion Mindy Stout July 8, Steve sang what was likely the most important song of his life. In a moment that hadn't been rehearsed or listed in the ceremony program, he recited traditional wedding vows and then grasped Mindy's hands and broke into song.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Baltimore man-about-town Steve Geppi gets a moment in the national spotlight on cable tonight. From tiny comic books do mighty empires grow.* "The Cosby Show" (5 p.m.-5:30 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- It ain't "I Spy," but it's as close as you'll get these days: Robert Culp, Bill Cosby's fellow spy from 1965 to 1968, shows up as the Huxtables' dinner host.* "Before They Were Stars" (8:30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- See David Letterman during his days as an Indiana weatherman, where he probably predicted hail the size of canned hams.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore | February 21, 2011
Digital entertainment has shaken the retail industry, shuttering your local brick-and-mortar record store, bookseller and video rental outlets. Could the neighborhood comic book shop be next? Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. hopes not. The Timonium company is the country's largest distributor of comics to about 2,700 small retailers. It has been fighting the same forces — online sales, changing consumer habits and even digital piracy — that are pushing other retailers to the brink.
NEWS
By RAY FRAGER | December 11, 1994
Walk into Stephen A. Geppi's office, but watch where you step.You don't want to damage that 1938 Terry and the Pirates miniature book over there. Careful with your elbow, you might disturb the Little Lulu paint book old enough to have belonged to your grandmother. Sure, check out the Oriole Park built of trading cards, but don't bump into the original drawing of Mr. Geppi shaking hands with Superman.In fact, on this day, an extensive comic-book collection he just acquired occupies most of Mr. Geppi's office at the headquarters of Diamond Comic Distributors, so he is temporarily working out of another spot in the building.
NEWS
By RAY FRAGER | December 11, 1994
Walk into Stephen A. Geppi's office, but watch where you step.You don't want to damage that 1938 Terry and the Pirates miniature book over there. Careful with your elbow, you might disturb the Little Lulu paint book old enough to have belonged to your grandmother. Sure, check out the Oriole Park built of trading cards, but don't bump into the original drawing of Mr. Geppi shaking hands with Superman.In fact, on this day, an extensive comic-book collection he just acquired occupies most of Mr. Geppi's office at the headquarters of Diamond Comic Distributors, so he is temporarily working out of another spot in the building.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Mike "Toodie" Geppi likes to tell the story of how his kid brother once passed up a chance to buy a Superman No. 1 comic -- now worth at least $65,000 in mint condition -- from the proprietor of a store near their home in Little Italy."
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