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By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,THE BOSTON GLOBE | February 11, 1996
Odds are that Steve Forbes will prove to be nothing more than the flavor of the month. But because the month of Mr. Forbes' fullest flavor happens to be the February of a presidential election year, attention must be paid to anything written about him.In the Feb. 12 New Republic, senior editor Michael Lewis captures the GOP candidate's weirdly robotic quality in a few deft strokes. We learn that Mr. Forbes, the publisher of a magazine celebrating capitalist vigor, never asks a single question while touring New Hampshire factories, never "displays the slightest curiosity about or pleasure in how things work."
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NEWS
February 15, 2013
Every year around this time, the media are replete with stories, both serious and funny, about the density, complexity, and inanity of our tax code ("The Carson monologue" Feb 12). One has to wonder if maybe we've gone a little too far in punishing, rewarding, and buying votes via the tax code. A shout out to Steve Forbes, and a huge amen to Dr. Ben Carson, for their pleas for a flat tax akin to the Biblical tithe wherein God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent year-in and year-out with no loopholes, no deductions, no exemptions.
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NEWS
February 29, 1996
MIXED RETURNS from the Arizona and Dakota primaries give some credence to the prospect of a wide open Republican National Convention in San Diego next August. If none of the four leading contenders can lock up the 996 delegates required for nomination, there could be a throwback to such memorable conventions as Wendell Willkie's thriller in 1940, the Eisenhower-Taft battle over who could vote from Texas in 1952 and the Kennedy-Johnson race to the wire in 1960.Such an outcome is still remote -- Maryland Rep. Connie Morella calls it a "pipe dream" -- given the nature of politics in a TV-dominated era. Yet her colleague, Rep. Bob Ehrlich, reports that a number of House Republicans are intrigued with the idea and are even talking up a favorite alumnus, Jack Kemp.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. -- A Category 5 campaign storm that had been forecast for Florida last night failed to materialize as the Republican contenders shied away from direct clashes in a nationally televised forum. Sen. John McCain, who has slipped behind Mitt Romney in recent polling in this state, hinted earlier in the day that he would challenge his rival's economic record as governor of Massachusetts. But when McCain was asked by one of the debate questioners whether he thought that the hundreds of millions of dollars in fees that Romney's administration levied on businesses was a tax increase, the Arizona senator replied mildly.
NEWS
January 9, 1996
ONE OF THE FEW surprises of the Republican pre-primary season has been the rise of Malcolm S. "Steve" Forbes Jr., to second place in the opinion polls ahead of such old political standbys as Phil Gramm, Lamar Alexander, Pat Buchanan and Dick Lugar. Publisher of the business magazine that bears his family name, Mr. Forbes still trails a resurgent Bob Dole by a large margin. But, like Ross Perot of four years ago, he makes the point that if money can't buy the presidency it can buy public attention.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes brought his campaign to Maryland yesterday, touring a Christian school in Woodlawn to highlight his support for a voucher program for private school students.Joined by Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, his most prominent supporter among Maryland Republicans, Forbes told students at the Gwynn Lake College Preparatory School that federal money should be passed to state and local governments to allow parents to use "coupons" toward private school tuition.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jack Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- A month ago, only two reporters showed up when Steve Forbes spoke to a Rotary Club luncheon in Portsmouth.This week, Mr. Forbes arrived for a 7:30 a.m. speech at a Rotary Club here and was met by six television crews and more than two dozen reporters from state and national news organizations.The message in this contrast is that Steve Forbes has suddenly become a hot political property, with the New Hampshire primary just a month away.Nor is his new celebrity reflected only in press attention.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 12, 1996
DES MOINES, Iowa -- As political novice Steve Forbes faces his first formal test of voting strength tonight in Iowa's caucuses, at his side will be a little-known political operative who literally runs the Forbes campaign out of a briefcase.He is William Dal Col, 39, a Cornell graduate in agronomy from Babylon, N.Y., who was chief of staff to former Bush administration housing secretary Jack Kemp.As the Forbes national campaign manager, he travels almost constantly with the candidate. They met when Mr. Forbes was chairman of Empower America, the conservative think tank founded by Mr. Kemp and Reagan Cabinet member William Bennett, and Mr. Dal Col was the group's president.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 13, 1996
DES MOINES, Iowa -- The millions of dollars that publishing magnate Steve Forbes dished out in his pursuit of the GOP presidential nomination transformed the race here. But they failed to bring him even close to the top prize at last night's caucuses.Falling far below expectations in the first real test of his strength as a presidential candidate, Mr. Forbes, who had made a splash here in recent weeks, won only 10 percent of the vote. He placed fourth behind Sen. Bob Dole, commentator Pat Buchanan and former Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 1996
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Three months ago, the wise guys of American politics had the Republican campaign all figured out. With Colin L. Powell and Jack Kemp on the sidelines, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole appeared to have a clear path to the nomination.Indeed, the conventional wisdom agreed that, barring some gaffe of the kind he had committed in the past, Mr. Dole might lock it up by winning the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary.But today, as voters go to the polling places here, Mr. Dole's stature as the front-runner appears to be hanging by a thread, although he has committed no such gaffe.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 8, 2006
NEW YORK -- The Forbes family has sold a minority stake in its magazine and Web site businesses to Elevation Partners LP, the buyout firm whose partners include U2 lead singer Bono. Terms weren't disclosed. Elevation Partners invested in newly created Forbes Media LLC, the publisher of Forbes magazine and Forbes.com, the New York-based company said in a statement yesterday. "I like our chances here," Roger McNamee, a co-founder of Elevation Partners, said in a phone interview. "Trust and authoritative content are the keys to be a successful investor in this industry and Forbes has both."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 22, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The nation having just been run over by the freight train that was the six-week presidential primary period producing Al Gore and George W. Bush as the two major-party nominees, the parties are now looking at ways to slow it down four years from now. Democratic National Chairman Joe Andrew and Republican National Chairman Jim Nicholson met the other day, along with former Sen. Bill Brock, head of a GOP commission on the subject, to start...
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | February 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It has been apparent for months, perhaps years, that Steve Forbes needed a friend. He needed someone, a peer not on his payroll, who would tell him, Steve, my friend, you are becoming a joke. You are never going to win the Republican nomination for president, no matter how much you spend. Instead, the magazine publisher has been surrounded by political consultants spending his money lavishly on their own salaries and commissions on television commercials. It was not in their self-interest to tell Mr. Forbes he had neither the personality nor the policy proposals to electrify voters.
TOPIC
By John Hendren | January 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Bertie Forbes spent a lot of the little money he had to convince people that he was what he was not: rich. The young journalist bought a suit and booked a room at the Waldorf. It was the best way to meet the business leaders he wrote about, the impoverished Scottish immigrant told friends. "It was spending, but with a purpose," says his grandson, Steve Forbes. Eighty years later, Steve Forbes has no problem persuading anyone of his wealth. His concern is showing people he can be president.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes brought his campaign to Maryland yesterday, touring a Christian school in Woodlawn to highlight his support for a voucher program for private school students.Joined by Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, his most prominent supporter among Maryland Republicans, Forbes told students at the Gwynn Lake College Preparatory School that federal money should be passed to state and local governments to allow parents to use "coupons" toward private school tuition.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 13, 1999
DES MOINES, Iowa -- Four years ago, Steve Forbes was burning up the presidential campaign circuit.His bespectacled features peered out from newsmagazine covers. Television talk shows vied to put the wealthy conservative on the air. One national poll showed him within seven points of President Clinton in a hypothetical fall election matchup.Today, his "geek chic" is passe, and Forbes seems more goofy than trendy. In one recent national survey, Republican voters ranked him near the bottom of the pack, behind Maryland radio talk show host Alan Keyes.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In November, a representative of Steve Forbes' political advertising agency made a fateful phone call to Julie Campasano, who books political ads at WMUR-TV in Manchester, N.H."They wanted to do a 'megabulk buy' -- that's what they called it," Ms. Campasano recalled. "They wanted tonnage, they wanted frequency, they wanted to be wherever they could be. They wanted to buy every stitch of advertising they could get -- and they darn near did. They had a walloping schedule."Financing his own upstart campaign, Mr. Forbes, heir to the Forbes publishing fortune, has turned the Republican presidential primary season upside down, riding his estimated $25 million media blitz to near the top of the polls in New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 2, 1996
The only thing voters in Oregon like less than the Democratic president is the Republican Congress. Maybe else- where, too.Steve Forbes is a side dish the conventional candidates never ordered.The interest-rate reduction is a reminder that the Democratic president gets re-elected only if Republican Fed members keep him out of recession.Most of the insiders who deny having written ''Primary Colors'' cannot stand not being suspected.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- While Vice President Al Gore is turning up the rhetorical heat on former Sen. Bill Bradley in an effort to turn back his surge that threatens the "inevitability" of Gore's Democratic presidential nomination, the Republican candidates are suddenly making nice with each other. What gives? The GOP debate among the six presidential aspirants in Arizona the other night was an absolute lovefest compared with their often scrappy encounter in New Hampshire just four nights earlier.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- To the average voter, the following names probably mean little or nothing: Tony Coelho, Gina Glantz, Bill Dal Col, Karl Rove, Rick Davis, Frank Cannon, Sal Russo, Dan Godzich. But in the roster of shakers and movers for the presidential politics of 2000, one of them likely will be hailed a year from now as the maker of the next president.They are the campaign managers and/or chief political strategists of the two Democratic and six surviving Republican candidates.Except for Coelho, the former California congressman who is running Vice President Al Gore's campaign and getting celebrity treatment in the media as a hard-nosed, take-charge guy in a turbulent operation, the group is relatively anonymous -- by intent.
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