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Steve Case

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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2001
Not long ago I fired off an America Online e-mail asking for a favor from an old friend, the photographer Paul McGrath, a gadget lover if ever there were one. I got an answer within moments. It came up short and sweet on the 35-pound, 19-inch monitor at my house. "OK. By the way, I'm writing this on my cell phone." Yessiree, friends and neighbors, AOL over your cell phone. It seems that over the past few months AOL's head genius in charge, Steve Case, found enough time while putting the final touches on the America Online/Time Warner merger to launch yet another master plan to take over the universe.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A company that helps nonprofits raise money has landed a $10 million investment and is acquiring Baltimore-based competitor GiveCorps for an undisclosed sum. Network For Good, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., has created a for-profit subsidiary NetworkForGood.com to receive the round of investment, led by Baltimore venture capital firm Camden Partners. Other investors included former AOL executive Steve Case and GiveCorps CEO Vince Talbert, who will become NetworkForGood.com's board chairman.
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NEWS
July 28, 1996
A photo caption identifying America Online's president, Steve Case, was mistakenly omitted from an article on the computer service on Page 1D of today's editions.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/28/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2005
It was quite a night at the Oscars for more than 300 Baltimoreans. They were gussied up in gowns and tuxes, passed the "paparazzi" on the red carpet and were interviewed by "Joan Rivers" on their way into the Baltimore Museum of Industry. OK. So, it wasn't L.A., but this was an officially sanctioned Oscars party, nonetheless. In fact, it was the fourth such fund-raising frolic for AIDS Interfaith Residential Services Inc. Once inside, guests were serenaded by Brian Commotto, the two-time Emmy-winning composer/pianist.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A company that helps nonprofits raise money has landed a $10 million investment and is acquiring Baltimore-based competitor GiveCorps for an undisclosed sum. Network For Good, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., has created a for-profit subsidiary NetworkForGood.com to receive the round of investment, led by Baltimore venture capital firm Camden Partners. Other investors included former AOL executive Steve Case and GiveCorps CEO Vince Talbert, who will become NetworkForGood.com's board chairman.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
When Steve Case was in college during the late 1970s, one thing was clear: He was a big thinker. Yesterday, he pulled off the biggest business deal in history. Case's America Online Inc. announced that it is buying Time Warner Inc. in a deal valued at $179.1 billion in stock and assumed debt. "He was thoughtful and concerned about society and ethical issues," recalled Mark C. Taylor, a humanities professor at Williams College in Massachusetts, who had Case as a student in his religion course.
BUSINESS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2002
Criticized for staying behind the scenes for much of the last year, AOL Time Warner Inc. Chairman Steve Case is under pressure to stage a comeback. Some company executives want Case - the billionaire founder of America Online - to move his full-time office from the Internet company's old headquarters in Virginia to New York, where most of the big decisions are now made. Others hope Case will take a more visible role on Capitol Hill, lobbying legislators and regulators. And after Chief Executive Officer Gerald M. Levin announced last month his intention to retire in the spring, company executives began referring to Case as the company's "active chairman," a subtle attempt to stress Case's growing involvement.
NEWS
By Holly Sklar | April 17, 2000
IT'S GETTING harder to tell CEO paychecks from lottery payouts. Except that CEOs expect to win big even when the company loses. When Coca-Cola CEO Douglas Ivester announced his retirement, Bloomberg compensation analyst Graef Crystal observed, "Here is a man who is resigning after a two-year tenure as CEO that produced a return for shareholders of a negative 7.3 percent. For that, he is walking away with stock, options and other goodies worth at least $120 million." Meanwhile, as the AFL-CIO Executive PayWatch reports, Coca-Cola is laying off thousands of workers and facing a lawsuit alleging the company discriminated against black employees in promotions, pay and performance evaluations.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham | July 5, 1998
Surely, the greater the communication among the peoples of this planet, the less are the dangers of such stupidities as war, unchecked human abuses and the perpetuation of ignorance. Though it is still in its technical infancy, instantaneous and inexpensive electronic communication -- the Internet or whatever already constitutes the most massive expansion of humankind's capacity to exchange words and information in all history. It is hard to argue that it is not an enormous boon.Yet in my grimmest moments, I can imagine no more dangerous blight on the human condition than the isolation into anonymity, virtually total removal from genuine human contact, of important parts of the world's population.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2005
It was quite a night at the Oscars for more than 300 Baltimoreans. They were gussied up in gowns and tuxes, passed the "paparazzi" on the red carpet and were interviewed by "Joan Rivers" on their way into the Baltimore Museum of Industry. OK. So, it wasn't L.A., but this was an officially sanctioned Oscars party, nonetheless. In fact, it was the fourth such fund-raising frolic for AIDS Interfaith Residential Services Inc. Once inside, guests were serenaded by Brian Commotto, the two-time Emmy-winning composer/pianist.
BUSINESS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2002
Criticized for staying behind the scenes for much of the last year, AOL Time Warner Inc. Chairman Steve Case is under pressure to stage a comeback. Some company executives want Case - the billionaire founder of America Online - to move his full-time office from the Internet company's old headquarters in Virginia to New York, where most of the big decisions are now made. Others hope Case will take a more visible role on Capitol Hill, lobbying legislators and regulators. And after Chief Executive Officer Gerald M. Levin announced last month his intention to retire in the spring, company executives began referring to Case as the company's "active chairman," a subtle attempt to stress Case's growing involvement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2001
Not long ago I fired off an America Online e-mail asking for a favor from an old friend, the photographer Paul McGrath, a gadget lover if ever there were one. I got an answer within moments. It came up short and sweet on the 35-pound, 19-inch monitor at my house. "OK. By the way, I'm writing this on my cell phone." Yessiree, friends and neighbors, AOL over your cell phone. It seems that over the past few months AOL's head genius in charge, Steve Case, found enough time while putting the final touches on the America Online/Time Warner merger to launch yet another master plan to take over the universe.
NEWS
By Holly Sklar | April 17, 2000
IT'S GETTING harder to tell CEO paychecks from lottery payouts. Except that CEOs expect to win big even when the company loses. When Coca-Cola CEO Douglas Ivester announced his retirement, Bloomberg compensation analyst Graef Crystal observed, "Here is a man who is resigning after a two-year tenure as CEO that produced a return for shareholders of a negative 7.3 percent. For that, he is walking away with stock, options and other goodies worth at least $120 million." Meanwhile, as the AFL-CIO Executive PayWatch reports, Coca-Cola is laying off thousands of workers and facing a lawsuit alleging the company discriminated against black employees in promotions, pay and performance evaluations.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
When Steve Case was in college during the late 1970s, one thing was clear: He was a big thinker. Yesterday, he pulled off the biggest business deal in history. Case's America Online Inc. announced that it is buying Time Warner Inc. in a deal valued at $179.1 billion in stock and assumed debt. "He was thoughtful and concerned about society and ethical issues," recalled Mark C. Taylor, a humanities professor at Williams College in Massachusetts, who had Case as a student in his religion course.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham | July 5, 1998
Surely, the greater the communication among the peoples of this planet, the less are the dangers of such stupidities as war, unchecked human abuses and the perpetuation of ignorance. Though it is still in its technical infancy, instantaneous and inexpensive electronic communication -- the Internet or whatever already constitutes the most massive expansion of humankind's capacity to exchange words and information in all history. It is hard to argue that it is not an enormous boon.Yet in my grimmest moments, I can imagine no more dangerous blight on the human condition than the isolation into anonymity, virtually total removal from genuine human contact, of important parts of the world's population.
NEWS
July 28, 1996
A photo caption identifying America Online's president, Steve Case, was mistakenly omitted from an article on the computer service on Page 1D of today's editions.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/28/96
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
A photo caption identifying America Online's president, Steve Case, was mistakenly omitted from an article on the computer service on Page 1D of today's editions.The Sun regrets the error.For a man who has lost $3.2 million this month, Steve Case is a pretty calm guy.The head of America Online Inc. is trying at once to navigate the riptide in the technology stock market and the tidal wave that is the Internet. His company has added 5 million customers in two years, yet his stock is down $41 a share over the past two-plus months.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 1999
DULLES, Va. -- America Online Inc., the largest Internet service, said yesterday that it will split its stock two for one, its second split this year and its fourth in the past two years, sending its shares higher after U.S. markets closed.America Online said shareholders of record on Nov. 8 will receive an additional share on Nov. 22. After the split, America Online will have about 2.2 billion shares outstanding.AOL shares rose $2.875 to $122.375 on the New York Stock Exchange. The news was released after the 4 p.m. close of trading, and shares surged to as much as $134 on the MarketXT electronic trading system.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
A photo caption identifying America Online's president, Steve Case, was mistakenly omitted from an article on the computer service on Page 1D of today's editions.The Sun regrets the error.For a man who has lost $3.2 million this month, Steve Case is a pretty calm guy.The head of America Online Inc. is trying at once to navigate the riptide in the technology stock market and the tidal wave that is the Internet. His company has added 5 million customers in two years, yet his stock is down $41 a share over the past two-plus months.
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