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December 13, 2005
STEFANO PALTERA Today's birthdays Comedian Dick Van Dyke, 80 -- Actor Christopher Plummer, 78 -- Singer Ted Nugent, 57 -- Country singer Randy Owen, 56 -- Actress Wendie Malick, 55 -- Actor Steve Buscemi, 48 -- Actor Jamie Foxx, (above) 38 -- Steve Carell Said It "So far I've accepted every acting job I've ever been offered. ... I hope to someday to actually play a part that's less of a jerk." Actor Steve Carell, who portrays the smug, egoistic boss on NBC's The Office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | November 12, 2012
" Bible camp's cancelled. " -- Gyp Rosetti The rubble of Babette's Supper Club is still smoking and the echoes of last week's blast are still ringing in Nucky Thompson's ears. An episode like "The Milkmaid's Lot" could have gone down a very reflexive road. This might have been Nucky's episode to dream he's a different person while he recovers from his wounds (looking at you, Tony Soprano). Instead, Steve Buscemi turns in a stellar performance as a shell-shocked Nucky who just wants all his rivals dead and a pony for his stepdaughter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
"Airheads" is a likably breezy film that should prove successful with its target audience and even bring more than a few smiles to the face of someone much older.Three frustrated L.A. rockers, desperate to get air time for their demo tape, inadvertently take over a rock radio station because they happen to be carrying water pistols that resemble Uzis. What kind of guy still plays with water pistols? Guys like Chazz (Brendan Fraser), Rex (Steve Buscemi) and Pip (Adam Sandler), who aren't too bright.
FEATURES
December 13, 2005
STEFANO PALTERA Today's birthdays Comedian Dick Van Dyke, 80 -- Actor Christopher Plummer, 78 -- Singer Ted Nugent, 57 -- Country singer Randy Owen, 56 -- Actress Wendie Malick, 55 -- Actor Steve Buscemi, 48 -- Actor Jamie Foxx, (above) 38 -- Steve Carell Said It "So far I've accepted every acting job I've ever been offered. ... I hope to someday to actually play a part that's less of a jerk." Actor Steve Carell, who portrays the smug, egoistic boss on NBC's The Office.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
One of the singular pleasures of watching "The Impostors," the new comedy by protean actor Stanley Tucci ("Big Night"), is the sound of the audience's laughter during the opening sequence of the movie.Tucci and Oliver Platt are engaged in a routine most often associated with the work of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton -- a comic pas de deux that involves much pantomimed confusion over tables and chairs, cigarettes and a girl, and that ends in a donnybrook of flying fists and a gothic death.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 14, 2000
Give Sandra Bullock credit for knowing her limitations. Having steadily built up her star clout since appearing in "Speed" about a thousand years ago, she easily could have gone the "Girl, Interrupted" route, adapting some searing first-person memoir to explore her inner demons and (God forbid) "stretch" herself as an actress. In "28 Days" she gets to explore inner demons, but not enough to cast a pall over her famously perky persona. She may be a recovering alcoholic and pill addict, but here rehab is more the comic milieu of some lovable, wacky characters than metaphor for human suffering in a world gone mad. Bullock's character goes through some changes, but she never turns into some unrecognizably serious actress.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Steve Buscemi's "Trees Lounge" is set in the alternate universe ... you know, the one where Steve Buscemi isn't a star.It's like an autobiographical fantasy, in which the brilliantly weaselly actor imagines what might have happened if he'd never left Long Island for downtown and the performance scene, never gotten that big break as Mr. Pink in "Reservoir Dogs" and gone on to become all but de rigueur in any independent film that demands to be taken seriously,...
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 17, 1997
It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a skinny, balding guy in a red cape!When Nicolas Cage soars in "Superman Lives" next year, he will complete the stunning transformation of action heroes in the '90s. No longer are bulging biceps or a washboard stomach required to shoot guns, nor is the guttural utterance of such one-liners as "Hasta la vista, baby" or "Make my day" needed to make audiences scream.Instead, all you need is an Oscar-winning actor primed on independent films intoning: "Put the bunny back in the box!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 18, 1995
"Living in Oblivion" actually lives in a different neighborhood: the hip precincts of drop-dead post-modernism. It's a film and a critique of film at once. It's narrative turned wittily in on itself with a maniac's glee. It does one other monstrously nifty thing: It dares make fun of Brad Pitt.Yes. Brad Pitt, self-styled homeboy Tarzan of Cinema of the '90s. Pitt is represented in "Living in Oblivion" by James Le Gros as vain, stupid, promiscuous, self-indulgent, self-promoting and a cry-baby.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunt and Stephen Hunt,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Here's something to do in Denver that would be more fun by far than seeing "Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead." You could die. Really, it would be more enjoyable."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 22, 2005
Scarlett Johansson was in danger of becoming nothing more than an art-house habitue's dream after appearing in movies like Ghost World, Lost in Translation and The Girl With a Pearl Earring. Her gifts for angst and ennui, and even her wispy blond allure, which lent itself to vagueness, allowed high-minded movie lovers to project their lonely, secret passions. She was in danger of becoming nothing more than a mood actress: an icon for the outre. So it's a relief to see her all toned-up and active in The Island, Michael Bay's latest special-effects extravaganza - just as it was a relief to see moody old Sean Penn do a Bogart-like star turn in The Interpreter.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2002
There are two major television movies related to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard airing in the next week. HBO has The Laramie Project tonight, while NBC offers The Matthew Shepard Story next Saturday. Of the two, tonight's Laramie Project is the one you don't want to miss - though it is not really about Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was brutally murdered by two young men who hated him because he was gay. As the title suggests, HBO's film is about Laramie, Wyo., specifically its culture and community following an attack that shocked the nation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Domestic Disturbance is strictly movie-of-the-week stuff. And not very good stuff, at that. This is a relentlessly ordinary thriller in which a boy who's cried "wolf" too often tries to convince his father that his seemingly virtuous stepdad is a murderer. The film features a walk-through performance from John Travolta, a menacing turn by Vince Vaughn (what's else is new?), a weasely turn by Steve Buscemi (ditto) and no twists we don't see from a mile away. The end result isn't bad, but it's nothing to brag about.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 14, 2000
Give Sandra Bullock credit for knowing her limitations. Having steadily built up her star clout since appearing in "Speed" about a thousand years ago, she easily could have gone the "Girl, Interrupted" route, adapting some searing first-person memoir to explore her inner demons and (God forbid) "stretch" herself as an actress. In "28 Days" she gets to explore inner demons, but not enough to cast a pall over her famously perky persona. She may be a recovering alcoholic and pill addict, but here rehab is more the comic milieu of some lovable, wacky characters than metaphor for human suffering in a world gone mad. Bullock's character goes through some changes, but she never turns into some unrecognizably serious actress.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
One of the singular pleasures of watching "The Impostors," the new comedy by protean actor Stanley Tucci ("Big Night"), is the sound of the audience's laughter during the opening sequence of the movie.Tucci and Oliver Platt are engaged in a routine most often associated with the work of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton -- a comic pas de deux that involves much pantomimed confusion over tables and chairs, cigarettes and a girl, and that ends in a donnybrook of flying fists and a gothic death.
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 17, 1997
It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a skinny, balding guy in a red cape!When Nicolas Cage soars in "Superman Lives" next year, he will complete the stunning transformation of action heroes in the '90s. No longer are bulging biceps or a washboard stomach required to shoot guns, nor is the guttural utterance of such one-liners as "Hasta la vista, baby" or "Make my day" needed to make audiences scream.Instead, all you need is an Oscar-winning actor primed on independent films intoning: "Put the bunny back in the box!"
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Domestic Disturbance is strictly movie-of-the-week stuff. And not very good stuff, at that. This is a relentlessly ordinary thriller in which a boy who's cried "wolf" too often tries to convince his father that his seemingly virtuous stepdad is a murderer. The film features a walk-through performance from John Travolta, a menacing turn by Vince Vaughn (what's else is new?), a weasely turn by Steve Buscemi (ditto) and no twists we don't see from a mile away. The end result isn't bad, but it's nothing to brag about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | November 12, 2012
" Bible camp's cancelled. " -- Gyp Rosetti The rubble of Babette's Supper Club is still smoking and the echoes of last week's blast are still ringing in Nucky Thompson's ears. An episode like "The Milkmaid's Lot" could have gone down a very reflexive road. This might have been Nucky's episode to dream he's a different person while he recovers from his wounds (looking at you, Tony Soprano). Instead, Steve Buscemi turns in a stellar performance as a shell-shocked Nucky who just wants all his rivals dead and a pony for his stepdaughter.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 25, 1996
Steve Buscemi's "Trees Lounge" is set in the alternate universe ... you know, the one where Steve Buscemi isn't a star.It's like an autobiographical fantasy, in which the brilliantly weaselly actor imagines what might have happened if he'd never left Long Island for downtown and the performance scene, never gotten that big break as Mr. Pink in "Reservoir Dogs" and gone on to become all but de rigueur in any independent film that demands to be taken seriously,...
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunt and Stephen Hunt,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Here's something to do in Denver that would be more fun by far than seeing "Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead." You could die. Really, it would be more enjoyable."
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