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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
It comes in snapshots now, no longer waves. Often it's triggered by the precocious 4-year-old with the wicked sense of humor. Sometimes it happens when Hailie Bechler makes a sarcastic quip that belies her pre-school status. Or when her mom gazes into those familiar, blue-green-gray eyes. Or when the little girl pulls her hair back to reveal a face that looks just like her daddy's. That's when Kiley Bechler really senses the spirit of her deceased husband, former Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler, who died of heatstroke five years ago today.
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By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
It comes in snapshots now, no longer waves. Often it's triggered by the precocious 4-year-old with the wicked sense of humor. Sometimes it happens when Hailie Bechler makes a sarcastic quip that belies her pre-school status. Or when her mom gazes into those familiar, blue-green-gray eyes. Or when the little girl pulls her hair back to reveal a face that looks just like her daddy's. That's when Kiley Bechler really senses the spirit of her deceased husband, former Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler, who died of heatstroke five years ago today.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Steve Bechler's widow might have a hard time collecting a large premium from Major League Baseball's life insurance policy, but she will get a significant contribution from Orioles owner Peter Angelos, Jim Beattie, the club's executive vice president, said yesterday. Steve Bechler, a 23-year-old Orioles pitching prospect, died Monday after collapsing at Sunday's practice and suffering heatstroke. His widow, Kiley Bechler, 22, is expecting the couple's child in April.
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By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Major league commissioners, team owners, elite athletes and high school sports officials applauded President Bush yesterday for using the high-profile stage of the State of the Union address to call for the abolition of performance-enhancing drugs. Young athletes emulate what they see on TV, and by holding professionals to a higher standard, the president elevated the debate, they said. "The president really is appealing to young people, and I hope that didn't go over people's heads," said Ron Belinko, coordinator of athletics for Baltimore County public schools.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
New York yesterday became the second state to ban over-the-counter sales of ephedra, the herbal supplement that has been linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Orioles vice president Mike Flanagan was in New York City to see Gov. George E. Pataki sign the bill into law. From now on, each sale of the supplement in that state will be subject to a $500 fine. Illinois was the first state to pass such a measure, and Flanagan said he hopes Maryland and other states will soon follow suit.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Orioles vice president of baseball operations Mike Flanagan spoke on the dangers of ephedra yesterday in Albany, N.Y., where the New York State Senate is expected to act this week on legislation to ban over-the-counter sales of the dietary supplement linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Illinois has already banned over-the-counter sales of ephedra, and New York State Senator Charles Fuschillo introduced a bill that would make New York the second state to take such measures.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Momentum continues to build in a wide-ranging effort to restrict the use of weight-loss supplements containing the herbal stimulant that may have contributed to the death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Baseball commissioner Bud Selig released a statement yesterday calling for talks with the Major League Baseball Players Association aimed at placing ephedrine and other potentially dangerous - but legal - supplements on Major League Baseball's list of banned substances.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - One week from the day her husband collapsed on an Orioles practice field, Kiley Bechler flew home to Oregon yesterday after taking a few moments to publicly thank people who supported her through a trying week. Steve Bechler, a 23-year-old Orioles pitching prospect, died last Monday from heatstroke, with Kiley Bechler at his bedside. She was driving cross-country when the Orioles delivered news of her husband's collapse, and they put her on a plane to Fort Lauderdale from Salt Lake City.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The company that makes the controversial ephedra-based diet supplement Xenadrine RFA-1 has filed a motion to include the Orioles as a third-party defendant in the $600 million lawsuit brought by the widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Nutraquest, formerly known as Cytodyne Industries, hopes to establish that the team was responsible for Bechler's death from heatstroke, though Broward County (Fla.) medical examiner Joshua Perper pointed to his ingestion of three Xenadrine capsules before a spring training workout as one of the major contributing factors in the tragedy.
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By Laura Vecsey | April 30, 2003
A FEW WEEKS back, the Bechlers made a strange discovery. Their son, Steve Bechler - or at least a video image of Steve Bechler - appears in PlayStation's MVP 2003 baseball game. "Our other son got a call at work to tell him Steve was on it, so my son went out and bought a few copies of it. I guess the teams include every player on the 40-man roster, and that's where Steve was. It's a nice treasure to have," Patricia Bechler said, choking back tears before adding: "But I can't watch baseball no more.
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December 14, 2003
O's fans should worry about wins, not payroll The fans' and media's preoccupation with the cost of major league baseball players is bewildering. Unless they believe that Orioles owner Peter Angelos is going to send them a dividend check if the team makes a profit, player salaries and other operating costs should be irrelevant to fans. All we want is a team that is competitive each year and occasionally contends for a championship. When Mr. Angelos bought the team, he knew he was going to be in a division with the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, two teams that have commitments to winning.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The company that makes the controversial ephedra-based diet supplement Xenadrine RFA-1 has filed a motion to include the Orioles as a third-party defendant in the $600 million lawsuit brought by the widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler. Nutraquest, formerly known as Cytodyne Industries, hopes to establish that the team was responsible for Bechler's death from heatstroke, though Broward County (Fla.) medical examiner Joshua Perper pointed to his ingestion of three Xenadrine capsules before a spring training workout as one of the major contributing factors in the tragedy.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
New York yesterday became the second state to ban over-the-counter sales of ephedra, the herbal supplement that has been linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Orioles vice president Mike Flanagan was in New York City to see Gov. George E. Pataki sign the bill into law. From now on, each sale of the supplement in that state will be subject to a $500 fine. Illinois was the first state to pass such a measure, and Flanagan said he hopes Maryland and other states will soon follow suit.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
On the six-month anniversary of her husband's death, Kiley Bechler spread the ashes of former Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler on the Camden Yards mound and both bullpen mounds during a quiet ceremony after yesterday's game. Steve Bechler died on Feb. 17 from complications related to heatstroke suffered during a spring training workout in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. "I think this is where he would want to be," said Kiley, who made the trip from Oregon along with her nearly 4-month-old daughter Hailie, her grandmother and younger sister.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
The widow of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler has filed a $600 million lawsuit against the maker of the ephedra-based diet drug and stimulant that was in his system when he died of heatstroke in February. New York attorney David Meiselman, representing Kiley Bechler, filed the suit Wednesday against Cytodyne Technologies, the company that produces Xenadrine RFA-1, and named New York-based manufacturer Phoenix Laboratories and Cytodyne president Robert Chinery as codefendants. The suit alleges the controversial nutritional supplement was directly responsible for Bechler's collapse during a spring training workout at the Orioles' training facility in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Feb. 16. Bechler lost consciousness and his body temperature rose to 108 degrees, causing his major organs to fail.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
SEATTLE - Kiley Bechler still keeps her husband's last love letter in their daughter's baby book. She volunteers to read it, and as the warm thoughts come rushing back, tiny cracks form in her confident, 22-year-old voice. Steve Bechler made a habit of leaving little notes for Kiley every time baseball took him away from home. On Feb. 7, the day he left for spring training with the Orioles, he wrote his thoughts about their new marriage and the baby they had on the way. One night earlier, the whole thing had him in tears.
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By LAURA VECSEY | February 19, 2003
STEVE BECHLER was 23 when he collapsed at the Orioles' spring training camp and died at a Fort Lauderdale hospital. The pitcher was about to become a father for the first time. His wife, who hopped a plane when a cell phone call informed her she needed to get to Florida fast, was at her husband's side Monday when he died. Who else was on Steve Bechler's side? Not Major League Baseball, which doesn't have mandated drug-testing for anything except illegal steroids - and even that new "policy" is a joke.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - On the wall outside his office, the medical examiner who performed Steve Bechler's autopsy has an inscription hanging inside a frame. It reads: "Let conversation cease. Let laughter flee. This is the place where death delights to help the living." Dr. Joshua Perper is a Romanian-born man with Baltimore ties who now serves as Broward County's chief medical examiner. For him, there's a point to all this talk about what caused Bechler - a 23-year-old Orioles pitching prospect - to collapse during practice and die of heatstroke.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
SEATTLE - Alex Rodriguez received a $100,000 bonus again this year for making the All-Star team, something the Texas Rangers added to that little $252 million contract he signed three years ago. When the Orioles' own Melvin Mora made his first All-Star team Sunday, he got zilch. His one-year, $1.73 million contract didn't include a clause with an All-Star bonus. A .249 career hitter coming into this season, Mora wasn't even on the All-Star ballot. Of the 62 players selected for the All-Star game, 47 had automatic bonuses in their contracts totaling $2.24 million.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Orioles vice president of baseball operations Mike Flanagan spoke on the dangers of ephedra yesterday in Albany, N.Y., where the New York State Senate is expected to act this week on legislation to ban over-the-counter sales of the dietary supplement linked to the death of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. Illinois has already banned over-the-counter sales of ephedra, and New York State Senator Charles Fuschillo introduced a bill that would make New York the second state to take such measures.
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