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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 20, 1999
Television's original Renaissance man, Steve Allen, entertained and then hung out with fans in Columbia as part of the Candlelight Concerts series.During "An Evening with Steve Allen," the 77-year-old jazz artist, author and comedian sang, played the piano and answered questions from the audience of 700 at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School.Later, at a post-show soiree held at the Vantage House Retirement Community, Allen mingled with a turnout of 250 people, which included Tom Roth, event chair; Bonita Bush, Candlelight Concerts executive director; Chuck Thomas, board president; Dennis Dunn, Holly Thomas and Bob Thulman, board members; Fran Minakowski, Maryland Public Television's head of corporate relations; George Fambro, design manager at the Rouse Co.; Glenn Charlow, Manekin Corp.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Robert Charles Allen, a retired photoengraver and Korean War veteran, died Jan. 2 from bone marrow and liver cancer at his Pasadena home. He was 80. Mr. Allen, the son of a postal worker and a homemaker, was born in Chicago where he lived before moving with his family to Pasadena, Calif., his junior year in high school. After graduating from Polytechnic High School in Pasadena in 1948, he attended Los Angeles City College for two years. He enlisted in the Army in 1950 and fought with an infantry unit in some of the war's bloodiest engagements, including the battle for Heartbreak Ridge, Bloody Ridge and the Punch Bowl.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
A recent caller to Howard Stern's morning radio show protested the presence of black actors on TV with a severe racial epithet four times in 20 seconds. The Grammy- winning rapper Eminem admiringly spins the tale of a young man who stabs his mother. A scene from the teen-age gross-out movie "American Pie" is said to have inspired a student at local prep school to videotape himself having sex with his (unaware) girlfriend and then screen the tape for his buddies. Clearly, the entertainment industry can turn a buck while finding a way to violate just about every standard of taste.
NEWS
November 9, 2002
Stan Burns, 79, an Emmy-winning comedy writer who worked on such television shows as The Steve Allen Show, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and The Carol Burnett Show, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement home in Los Angeles. Mr. Burns won an Emmy for outstanding writing achievement in variety or music programs for The Carol Burnett Show during the 1971-72 season. His writing career took off in the 1950s, when he contributed to Broadway Open House, the original Tonight Show, starring Steve Allen, and the The Steve Allen Show.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 1, 2000
Steve Allen, comedian, composer and one of the founding fathers of late night television as host of the original "Tonight Show," is dead at 78, his son announced yesterday. Bill Allen said that his father was visiting at his Encino home and went to bed early Monday night shortly after dinner saying he felt tired and never awakened. "He went peacefully," Bill Allen said. Steve Allen's career was incredibly diverse and prolific. He wrote 53 books, recorded 52 record albums and CDs, starred in the 1956 feature film, "The Benny Goodman Story," and wrote more than 3,000 songs, including "This Could Be The Start of Something Big."
NEWS
November 9, 2002
Stan Burns, 79, an Emmy-winning comedy writer who worked on such television shows as The Steve Allen Show, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and The Carol Burnett Show, died Tuesday of heart failure at the Motion Picture and Television Fund retirement home in Los Angeles. Mr. Burns won an Emmy for outstanding writing achievement in variety or music programs for The Carol Burnett Show during the 1971-72 season. His writing career took off in the 1950s, when he contributed to Broadway Open House, the original Tonight Show, starring Steve Allen, and the The Steve Allen Show.
NEWS
May 21, 1992
WHEN THE King of Late Night bids his television audience farewell for the last time in the wee hours tomorrow (it will actually be early on Saturday, Eastern Daylight Time, when we see it here), it will mark the end of an era in cultural American history.Thirty years of Johnny Carson is a lifetime for many of us. He has become as familiar as the bedroom furniture. And just as comfortable, and as predictably cozy, as those warm winter slippers.But the real generational symbol is hardly getting any notice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
Robert Charles Allen, a retired photoengraver and Korean War veteran, died Jan. 2 from bone marrow and liver cancer at his Pasadena home. He was 80. Mr. Allen, the son of a postal worker and a homemaker, was born in Chicago where he lived before moving with his family to Pasadena, Calif., his junior year in high school. After graduating from Polytechnic High School in Pasadena in 1948, he attended Los Angeles City College for two years. He enlisted in the Army in 1950 and fought with an infantry unit in some of the war's bloodiest engagements, including the battle for Heartbreak Ridge, Bloody Ridge and the Punch Bowl.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 30, 1993
For me, the late-night war is over before it begins. Dave wins, Bud Melman or no Bud Melman. I don't care what the ratings say or who has the most clearance, whatever that is. As they say on MTV, Dave rules.You want the top 10 reasons?I'd love to give them to you, but I can't. NBC owns the Top-10 List and Pea Boy and Monkeycam and the other Davisms. The network calls them -- I swear this is true -- its "intellectual property" and will shoot anyone who trespasses.This stance has come to be known in the trade as stupid NBC tricks.
HEALTH
By Janice Perrone and Janice Perrone,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 11, 1990
"A woman I'd never seen before came into my office, crying," says Steve Allen Jr., M.D."I asked her what was the problem and she sobbed for about three minutes, then told me about a terrible event in her life. Then she started to sob again."Is there anything else you'd like to tell me?" Dr. Allen, a family physician, asked. The patient started to cry again, uncontrollably."I just moved to the area and my boyfriend left me." Sobs."Is there anything else you'd like to tell me?""My mother has cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
A recent caller to Howard Stern's morning radio show protested the presence of black actors on TV with a severe racial epithet four times in 20 seconds. The Grammy- winning rapper Eminem admiringly spins the tale of a young man who stabs his mother. A scene from the teen-age gross-out movie "American Pie" is said to have inspired a student at local prep school to videotape himself having sex with his (unaware) girlfriend and then screen the tape for his buddies. Clearly, the entertainment industry can turn a buck while finding a way to violate just about every standard of taste.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 1, 2000
Steve Allen, comedian, composer and one of the founding fathers of late night television as host of the original "Tonight Show," is dead at 78, his son announced yesterday. Bill Allen said that his father was visiting at his Encino home and went to bed early Monday night shortly after dinner saying he felt tired and never awakened. "He went peacefully," Bill Allen said. Steve Allen's career was incredibly diverse and prolific. He wrote 53 books, recorded 52 record albums and CDs, starred in the 1956 feature film, "The Benny Goodman Story," and wrote more than 3,000 songs, including "This Could Be The Start of Something Big."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 20, 1999
Television's original Renaissance man, Steve Allen, entertained and then hung out with fans in Columbia as part of the Candlelight Concerts series.During "An Evening with Steve Allen," the 77-year-old jazz artist, author and comedian sang, played the piano and answered questions from the audience of 700 at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School.Later, at a post-show soiree held at the Vantage House Retirement Community, Allen mingled with a turnout of 250 people, which included Tom Roth, event chair; Bonita Bush, Candlelight Concerts executive director; Chuck Thomas, board president; Dennis Dunn, Holly Thomas and Bob Thulman, board members; Fran Minakowski, Maryland Public Television's head of corporate relations; George Fambro, design manager at the Rouse Co.; Glenn Charlow, Manekin Corp.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 30, 1993
For me, the late-night war is over before it begins. Dave wins, Bud Melman or no Bud Melman. I don't care what the ratings say or who has the most clearance, whatever that is. As they say on MTV, Dave rules.You want the top 10 reasons?I'd love to give them to you, but I can't. NBC owns the Top-10 List and Pea Boy and Monkeycam and the other Davisms. The network calls them -- I swear this is true -- its "intellectual property" and will shoot anyone who trespasses.This stance has come to be known in the trade as stupid NBC tricks.
NEWS
May 21, 1992
WHEN THE King of Late Night bids his television audience farewell for the last time in the wee hours tomorrow (it will actually be early on Saturday, Eastern Daylight Time, when we see it here), it will mark the end of an era in cultural American history.Thirty years of Johnny Carson is a lifetime for many of us. He has become as familiar as the bedroom furniture. And just as comfortable, and as predictably cozy, as those warm winter slippers.But the real generational symbol is hardly getting any notice.
HEALTH
By Janice Perrone and Janice Perrone,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 11, 1990
"A woman I'd never seen before came into my office, crying," says Steve Allen Jr., M.D."I asked her what was the problem and she sobbed for about three minutes, then told me about a terrible event in her life. Then she started to sob again."Is there anything else you'd like to tell me?" Dr. Allen, a family physician, asked. The patient started to cry again, uncontrollably."I just moved to the area and my boyfriend left me." Sobs."Is there anything else you'd like to tell me?""My mother has cancer.
NEWS
By LYNDA BARRY | January 24, 1992
Chicago. -- I was 7 years old the first time I sneaked out of the house in the dark. It was winter and my parents had been fighting all night. They were short on money and long on relatives who kept ''temporarily'' moving into our house because they had nowhere else to go.My brother and I were used to giving up our bedroom. We slept on the couch, something we actually liked because it put us that much closer to the light of our lives, our television.At night when everyone was asleep, we lay on our pillows watching it with the sound off. We watched Steve Allen's mouth moving.
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