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SPORTS
March 24, 2010
A Northern Virginia chiropractor was arrested on drug charges after a co-defendant accused him of supplying steroids to members of the Washington Capitals and Nationals. The Capitals acknowledged that some of their players had received "routine chiropractic services" from the suspect but denied that any players received steroids. Douglas O. Nagel , 50, of Reston, was arrested Tuesday morning in Virginia and charged by Florida authorities with seven counts of soliciting to deliver a controlled substance, specifically steroids.
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NEWS
August 6, 2013
Major League Baseball took its strongest action yet against the use of steroids in the national pastime on Monday, handing down 12 season-ending suspensions and one that will keep the game's highest-paid star, Alex Rodriguez, off the field until 2015. The Baltimore Orioles, we are happy to report, were not implicated in the latest fallout from the sport's investigation of the Coral Gables, Fla., Biogenesis lab, but members of the team had two of the most interesting things to say about it. The first is remarkable not just for what was said but for who said it. Nick Markakis, the Orioles' excellent but generally soft-spoken right fielder, unloaded on steroid users just before the suspensions were announced Monday, saying baseball should ban players for at least five years for a first offense.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 2, 2011
Rafael Palmeiro strolled into the big sports memorabilia show at the Hilton Hotel in Pikesville Sunday wearing an orange sweater, jeans and a hip goatee that made him look like the bass player in a jazz band. He was nearly three hours late. His flight from Texas had been delayed. Mechanical problems, Palmeiro explained as a crowd quickly formed to have the former Orioles great sign baseballs and bats and whatever else was thrust in front of him. "First time back in Baltimore?" someone asked.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Orioles first baseman Chris Davis understands that there are going to be whispers, and that those will grow louder if he continues his torrid home run pace. He is, after all, a muscle-rippling power hitter with video-game home run totals. He knows the steroid accusations are inevitable and will accompany his pursuit of home run records this season. “I think it sucks that guys in our day and age have to answer for mistakes that guys have made in the past. But it is part of it,” said Davis, who has 33 home runs in his first 92 games for the Orioles this season.
NEWS
February 28, 2007
Teenagers trying to enhance either their body image or their athletic prowess often turn to steroids or hormonal supplements without realizing the potentially harmful consequences. That's why a new local public awareness campaign about steroid dangers for teens is right on target. A 2003 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that nearly 1 million high school students said they had tried steroids, triple the number who confessed to using them in 1993. The most rapid increase in use was among girls, probably due to their increased participation in sports as a result of Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education.
SPORTS
By Manny Topol and Manny Topol,Newsday | May 15, 1992
Doctors who deal with sports medicine say there has never been a case in which steroids have caused a cancer like the brain lymphona that led to Lyle Alzado's death yesterday.Dr. Brian Hainline, director of clinical neurology service and sportsneurology at Manhattan's Hospital for Joint Diseases, said yesterday, "The bottom line is that there are no data which would support the linkage between anabolic steroids and brain cancer, specifically primary brain lymphoma."Hainline added, "We should always be open-minded that there could be a link, but there is a danger when you say that this is a cause and effect.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
Following a national trend, the Maryland Racing Commission said yesterday that it is "resolved" to implement a ban on anabolic steroids beginning with the Pimlico race meet April 17. Maryland will follow the recommendations set forth in a Dec. 17 meeting by the Association of Racing Commissioners International and the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium. The RMTC is pushing for the regulation of four commonly used steroids - boldenone (Equipose), stanozolol (Winstrol), nandrolone (Durabolin)
FEATURES
By Medical Tribune News Service | July 26, 1995
Sometimes the wheels of progress turn faster than expected.Last week, scientists reported that low-dose steroids are effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis -- but other experts warned that long-term use of steroids can cause bone loss.Now, another group of researchers reports that estrogen-replacement therapy can block the bone-damaging effects of steroid treatment.British and French investigators, led by Dr. G. M. Hall of St. Thomas Hospital in London, studied 106 postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
Two Anne Arundel County police officers charged administratively with using steroids for nonmedical purposes have been suspended without pay for 25 days, police sources and officials said yesterday.Three others caught up in the same scandal have been ordered to receive counseling from their superiors, and punishments for three more have not been determined, according to Officer Terry Crowe, police spokesman.Police sources identified John Church and James Cifala as the officers who were suspended by Chief Robert P. Russell.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Orioles first baseman Chris Davis understands that there are going to be whispers, and that those will grow louder if he continues his torrid home run pace. He is, after all, a muscle-rippling power hitter with video-game home run totals. He knows the steroid accusations are inevitable and will accompany his pursuit of home run records this season. “I think it sucks that guys in our day and age have to answer for mistakes that guys have made in the past. But it is part of it,” said Davis, who has 33 home runs in his first 92 games for the Orioles this season.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Baltimore County pain treatment center is resisting involvement in a probe into the deadly national fungal meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids last year. Baltimore Pain Management Center, which received some doses of the recalled medications, filed an objection Tuesday in federal court to a subpoena it received last month. Lawyers are seeking documents from 76 clinics across the country, including seven in Maryland, that received the drugs as they build a case against New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc., the Massachusetts facility that produced them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steven Eliopoulos | April 23, 2013
The episode jumps right into Vicki inviting Alexis to be her date for Tamra's party. Alexis has second thoughts about this and is surprised that Tamra even agreed to let her to attend. Alexis finally agrees to be Vicki's date and thinks it would be a splendid idea to invite her “Christian on steroids” friend Lydia to join the group at the dinner party as well. Let's see how many people we can fill the room with at Tamra's party that she either can't stand or doesn't even know.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
I was overjoyed to learn that no one was nominated for entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame this year ("Voters shut out players," Jan. 10). A few nominees, including Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Barry Bonds, were shunned in their first year of eligibility. I have been patiently awaiting this: We are witnessing the backlash of negativism toward former ball players who allegedly abused steroids. The really lamentable thing is that these men would have likely traipsed into the Hall without the assistance, if you will, of steroid use. Those players who used or abused steroids put themselves above the sport, and that is why I am happy to see these men suffer the consequences and futility of not gaining entry at Cooperstown.
NEWS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
One of the perks of covering the Orioles is that we have easy access to Jim Palmer, a Hall of Fame pitcher who, unlike some other great players, has no problem speaking his mind. I talked to Palmer on Wednesday after he deplaned in Southern California - he will be presented with the Professional Baseball Scouts' Foundation's lifetime achievement award on Saturday in Los Angeles - about the Baseball Writers' of America Association failing to induct anyone into this year's Hall of Fame class, including Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
A national outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to a tainted steroid killed two Marylanders. Nearly two dozen people living with the disease and hundreds of others who may have been exposed fear they may be next. Sheila Smelkinson began suffering in July from pain in her lower back and right leg that kept the Pikesville resident awake for all but a few hours each night. Cortisone shots, one in August and a second in September, relieved her discomfort - until she received a call informing her the medication was among batches contaminated with fungus in a Massachusetts pharmaceutical facility.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | December 22, 2012
We live in a world of sports that is broadcast in full color and high definition. We try to view it through a prism of moral and ethical absolutes. And still, when faced with the great issues of our time, everything ends up being cast in shades of gray. If you doubt that, you might want to take a look at the ballot that will determine who will be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013. It is, more than any before it, a snapshot of baseball's steroid era, for the first time adding Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa to a list of candidates that already included Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro and a handful of other players who fell under suspicion during one of the darkest periods in the history of the sport.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 1998
BERLIN -- A former East German sports doctor admitted yesterday in a Berlin court that he handed out anabolic steroids for use by young female swimmers, the first formal confession of such practices by an official of the Communist state that once churned out gold-medal-winning athletes.In a brief statement, Dieter Binus said that the doses of the steroids never exceeded 1,000 milligrams a year, an amount that he contended was too small to harm the young swimmers. He denied giving testosterone injections or other drugs to the athletes.
NEWS
December 15, 1994
Narcotics detectives raided a Glen Burnie apartment Tuesday night and charged the resident with possession of anabolic steroids, police said.Detectives obtained a search warrant for the home of Charles Speake, 24, in the 6400 block of Polk Circle, police said. The raid occurred shortly after 8 p.m.The investigation was conducted in cooperation with investigators from the federal Food and Drug Administration and was designed to stop the importation of steroids into the county, police said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
John C. "Jack" Millhausen, an 84-year-old Fallston resident, is at least the second Marylander to die of fungal meningitis in a national epidemic that experts say is slowing but about which many questions remain. Millhausen died Nov. 15 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson, his family said, not long after receiving a spinal shot of a contaminated steroid, several batches of which have caused nearly 600 cases of infections and 37 deaths across the country. Maryland health officials confirmed a second death in the state from the outbreak on Monday but would not confirm that it was Millhausen's, citing confidentiality rules.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
The Baseball Writers' Association of America released its Hall of Fame ballot today, and now the next six weeks will be filled with debate on whether some of the biggest names -- and most controversial characters -- will get into Cooperstown's hallowed halls. Players on the ballot for the first time include a few stars that were embroiled in the sport's steroid controversy: namely Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and former Orioles outfielder Sammy Sosa. Mike Piazza, Craig Biggio and Curt Schilling also are first-timers, joining popular holdovers such as Jeff Bagwell, Jack Morris and Tim Raines on the ballot.
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