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NEWS
September 8, 2004
On Tuesday, September 7, 2004 JEROME STERN; devoted brother of Michael Stern and Charles Stern both of Baltimore; brother-in-law of Sharon Stern and Wendy Stern; uncle of Jared Stern and Kevin Stern; son of the late Erwin and Jeanette (nee Schnitzer) Stern. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd. at Mt. Wilson Ln. on Wednesday, September 8 at 11 A.M. Interment Shaarei Zion Congregation, Rosedale. In lieu of flowers contributions in his memory may be directed to Ruxton Pikesville Nursing Home, 7 Sudbrook Rd. (21208)
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Wedding date: June 1, 2013 Her story: Samantha Stern, 29, grew up in Baltimore. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland, College Park, and an operations manager at T. Rowe Price. She is the eldest daughter of Cindy and Jerry Stern. His story: Mark Pilon, 29, was born in Michigan but grew up mostly in Lake Forest, Il. His parents, Larry and Shelley Pilon, live in Illinois. Mark came to Maryland after his mother read about McDaniel College (then Western Maryland College)
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NEWS
February 13, 2005
On Februay 11, 2005, JOAN S. STERN (nee Steinberg); beloved wife of Stanley A. Stern; devoted mother of Martin Stern of Detroit, MI; loving grandmother of Elspeth Stern. Services and interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane, on Sunday, February 13 at 1 P.M. Please omit flowers. In mourning at 6401 Elray Drive, Apt. D (21209). Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 9, 2013
UMBC women's basketball Stern reverses course, will stay on as coach UMBC women's basketball coach Phil Stern , who briefly accepted a position as associate head coach at Seton Hall under new head coach Anthony Bozzella, will remain with the program, Retrievers athletic director Charles Brown announced Monday. "I regret the way this decision transpired. While the position at Seton Hall presented a new challenge, this process once again reminded me of what a vibrant and supportive community UMBC is," Stern said.
NEWS
September 5, 2004
On September 3, 2004, CLOYD R. "Rit" STERN; beloved husband of Dorothy Stern (nee Spangler); dear father of Charlotte Porter, Frederick Stern and Bonnie Keil; proud grandfather of seven grandchildren, thirteen great-grandchildren and three step-great grandchildren. Funeral from the Gregory J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena, on Tuesday at 11 A.M. Interment in Glen Haven Memorial Park. Family request friends call on Sunday and Monday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
An ebullient Howard Stern, newly unconstrained by federal regulations that limit obscenity over airwaves, launched his satellite radio program yesterday morning and claimed, none too modestly, that he was at the forefront of a radio revolution. Predictably, his debut was peppered with curses and references to sex - the same fare that made him notorious years ago. "It's a great triumph for us," Stern crowed during his first four-hour show, which was commercial-free, on Sirius Satellite Radio.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1994
Pointing to a recent court decision that struck down federal restrictions on indecent broadcasting, officials at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said this week they might not be able to stop the company that employs Howard Stern, the radio personality, from buying more stations.Mr. Stern's chief critic at the FCC, James Quello, a commissioner, conceded Thursday that the commission would face big legal obstacles in any attempt to block Infinity Broadcasting Corp., Mr. Stern's employer, from buying three radio stations for $170 million.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
"Gloria Steinem: Her Passions, Politics, and Mystique," by Sydney Ladensohn Stern. Birch Lane Press 288 pages. $24.95.This is Sydney Ladensohn Stern's first foray into the biography genre. Readers can only hope it will be her last. Kindly put, Stern has not mastered the art. If Steinem were dead, she'd be spinning in her grave; still living, she may never be able to leave her apartment again. This book embarrasses both author and subject.How bad is it? Poorly researched, execrably written, badly organized, facilely argued -- - it's difficult to pinpoint the worst flaw.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Radio is the source of a lot of edgy entertainment these days - racy proclamations, angry rants and ego-driven intrigue - but it's mostly happening off the air. This week alone, executives at the nation's largest radio company, Clear Channel Communications, set new internal standards for decency, fired a Florida talk show host known as "Bubba the Love Sponge" for his explicit comments on sex and drugs, and pulled the program of Howard Stern, the nation's...
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 12, 1994
Fox is temporarily getting out of the late-night business again.Beginning Jan. 31, the 11 p.m. ET hour that has been filled by reruns of "In Living Color" since Chevy Chase self-destructed in October will be turned back to affiliates to program on their own."Because our priority right now is our commitment to the NFL and because we know that most affiliates have programming on the shelf, which they can use to maximize their opportunities in late night, we are temporarily suspending our late-night feed while continuing our late-night development efforts," Preston Padden, Fox executive vice president for affiliate relations, said in a statement released to the news media.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Whether it's a war-zone deployment, a cargo ship in port for 18 hours or a passenger cruise ship on its regular stop, R.S. Stern Inc. has put groceries in larders and spare parts in engine rooms since 1870. From its brick warehouse in Canton, the company's 15 employees dispense uniforms and copier supplies, mops for swabbing and pork chops for dinner to about 1,000 ships calling on Baltimore and other nearby ports each year. Need a 4-by-6 Sri Lankan flag for the mast? Stern's got you covered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 29, 2012
When "America's Got Talent" took a break for the Olympics at the end of July, the number of contestants had been cut down to manageable-to-remember 16. Now, two weeks after its return, with tangential rounds devoted to YouTube "talents"and wild card picks, the show is back up to an overwhelming 24. Now, over the next two weeks, "AGT" will cut the 24 down to six and the finals will well, finally begin. Host Nick Cannon referred to this week's episode as the "first semi-finals. " This is just reality TV stringing-along an audience and we've all unfortunately grown to accept it. First to the stage was Andrew De Leon, who sang "Ave Maria" as opera-like as he could.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Olivia Ignacio | May 23, 2012
"America's Got Talent" is in New York for a second night. Howard Stern brought his parents along. They look like a sweet old couple, but according to Howard, they've been complaining about waiting in the auditorium for the past two hours. First to audition is a singer/dancer named Ronald Charles. I can already tell his act isn't going to be pretty; his turquoise leggings and weird haircut are dead giveaway. I'm right. He's so awful, Howard gets his dad (who is conveniently equipped with a microphone)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
I will admit it, I came to the season premiere of "America's Got Talent" to rip Howard Stern. But I walk away after two hours with nothing but admiration for Stern and the producers of this potent franchise. And I'm not simply praising AGT as a slick or skilled production. "America's Got Talent" connects with some of the deepest currents of American life today. For all its sideshow, freakshow silliness and weirdness  at times, it also speaks to a huge slice of American life that our politicians don't seem to know or care about one little bit any more as they move from fund raiser to fund raiser and TV studio to soundstage in their cocoons of media and million-dollar isolation from the masses.
NEWS
By Bruce S. Lemkin | April 30, 2012
After four years of negotiating in and with North Korea, I cannot say that I have all of the answers to deal with a regime that defies the expectations of rational thinking, but I do have at least one of them: The Democratic People's Republic of Korea leadership, whoever happens to be the leader of the moment, whether Great, Dear, or Supreme, can only be dissuaded from chronically irresponsible behavior and from crossing a so-called red line (i.e.,...
NEWS
By Helene Elliott, Tribune newspapers | September 22, 2011
David Stern, NBA Still The Man, though the NBA has hit some potholes. Stern imposed the lockout to overhaul an economic system he says led 23 of 30 teams to lose money. Barring a quick agreement, the opening of training camps in early October will be jeopardized as will an on-time Nov. 1 season start. Robert Boland, professor of sports business at New York University's Tisch Center, said Stern is "the one who is held in the greatest awe" among commissioners for resuscitating the NBA and building global appeal through the Olympics.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | May 3, 2011
Colleges UMBC women's basketball coach Stern gets 6-year deal Two months after leading the Retrievers to their first America East regular-season title and a berth in the Women's National Invitation Tournament, UMBC women's basketball coach Phil Stern has agreed to a six-year contract that runs through the 2016-17 season. Stern was named America East Coach of the Year after guiding the Retrievers, who were picked to finish fifth in the preseason poll, to a 20-12 overall record and a 13-3 mark in league play.
NEWS
By Mike Bresnahan, Tribune Newspapers | February 20, 2011
LOS ANGELES — NBA Commissioner David Stern has a message for the players association: The system's broken and needs to be fixed. It was the most telling theme to come out of Stern's 30-minute session with reporters Saturday, an annual briefing dominated by questions about the looming lockout. Stern said this season that owners were projecting losses of about $350million, and though he didn't provide updated figures Saturday, he said the losses are palpable. "The numbers are real, the losses are real, and the need from our perspective for a different business model, that's what's governing our decision," Stern said.
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