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NEWS
December 9, 2010
In response to the article "Arrest made in bombing plot" (Dec. 9) I must say I was surprised, almost offended, by the author's portrayal of Islam. Throughout the article, the conversion to Islam by the suspect in the attempt to bomb a Catonsville military recruiting station was portrayed as bizarre, as if Islam was less a religion and more of a cult. This sort of rhetoric is only fanning the flames of Islamophobia that are burning our country. I, too, am a young convert to Islam, and I'm sure those who know me would describe my shift as nothing close to bizarre.
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
On Sunday night, Walmart aired a commercial promoting watermelon during the BET Awards, one of the most popular TV programs among African-American households. The commercial features a grower who says "summertime is watermelon time. " The farmer extols the virtues of tending his crop and also of his relationship with Walmart, which offers a money-back guarantee that its watermelon will be fresh. With the Fourth of July right around the corner, consumption of the luscious red fruit is reaching its peak.
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NEWS
August 19, 2013
There is no empirical support for the recent commentary claiming that welfare benefits are discouraging people from jobs ("In Maryland, it pays not to work," Aug. 14). The opinion piece is disingenuous and its recommendations are reckless. Tighten eligibility? Empirical data show that upward of 60 percent of all Maryland cash assistance applications are denied. Toughen work rules? Non-compliance with Maryland work rules stops cash grants. Reduce benefit levels? The maximum monthly cash grant for a Maryland family of three is $576, about 35 percent of the federal poverty level.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mike Gimbel's letter about a harm-reduction program that trains people to administer the anti-overdose medication Narcan was based on an outdated, stereotypical description of drug addicts ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While there may be many drug addicts who "aren't good parents and can't do an honest day's work," I have had the pleasure to know many addicts who go to work every day, are good parents to their children and would be considered contributing members of their community.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Ross Singer's recent commentary revealed a truth that so many on either side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict refuse to acknowledge ("Friend or foes? Oct. 17). When we get to know people as human beings, regardless of the side with which they identify, we learn that simplistic generalizations and platitudes about the "other" don't fit. The events leading up the establishment of the state of Israel and its aftermath require a much more nuanced reading than political and religious leaders on either side would have us believe.
NEWS
January 29, 1992
From: David WeeksEllicott CityIn his review of the "Voices from the Streets" performance at theGlenelg Country School (Howard County Sun, "Ex-homeless share raw message at affluent school," by James M. Coram, Jan. 19), Mr. Coram hasperpetuated the kind of stereotypical thinking which school administrators and teachers had hoped the program addressing homelessness andthe urban poor would break down for students.The plight of the urban poor and homeless is symptomatic of the deterioration of our society.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS Jr | April 14, 1995
Miami -- The incident troubled me for days.Sen. Alfonse D'Amato was a guest last week on ''Imus in the Morning,'' the syndicated New York call-in show hosted by shock jock Don Imus. In discussing the O.J. Simpson trial, Senator D'Amato mocked Japanese-American Judge Lance Ito as ''little Judge Ito.'' The New York lawmaker spoke in a caricature of a Japanese accent. Judge Ito, for what it's worth, speaks flawless English.Is this, I wondered, what the nation is coming to? I set out to find an answer.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
One in a series of occasional articles. Hearses enter the six-story building in West Baltimore through garage doors that snap open and shut quickly, to keep business discreet. Researchers who work across from the $43 million Forensic Medical Center catch glimpses of the drop-offs. They call the state-of-the-art center on the edge of the University of Maryland BioPark "the Bat Cave. " The morgue - shrouded in myth, misrepresented on screen - typically is portrayed as a dark, dank basement with sexy forensic investigators peering into microscopes, eccentric doctors weighing body parts, and officials pulling open refrigerated drawers, unzipping body bags and asking spouses: "Is this your husband?"
NEWS
May 17, 1997
I AM WRITING in response to your May 9 editorial, ''Switzerland's shame'' and the accompanying cartoon. I was appalled by the vitriolic and simplistic tenor of your comments, which do little to encourage honest introspection and inquiry.I grew up in Switzerland during the war years, exquisitely aware of the problems faced by my country.My mother was Jewish. She had met my father, a Swiss journalist, in 1933, while he reported on the infamous ''Kristalnacht,'' the night Nazi thugs destroyed Jewish businesses all over Germany.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
A black man was injured on the job. He sued his employer for damages. The employer's lawyers used peremptory challenges, which do not have to be justified, to keep two blacks off the jury. This apparently was because they believed black jurors would not be impartial with a black plaintiff. The injured party, after getting a disappointing award, sued on the grounds that the Constitution requires courtroom activities to be "race-neutral." He pointed out that the Supreme Court had previously ruled that in criminal trials prosecutors could not use peremptory challenges for racial purposes.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
When Jeff Shaney and his wife bought their historic home last year, he says, his friends from Towson all asked the same thing. "Why did you move to Dundalk?" The waterfront community in Baltimore County has long suffered skeptics and detractors - it's been derided by some as "Dumb-dalk," and when a survey was conducted three years ago, people in the area described it in terms that were not pretty: Rats. Crime. Filth. "If you've never been here, you may think the town is a dying steel plant - or now, a dead steel plant," said Amy Menzer, executive director of the nonprofit Dundalk Renaissance Corp.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
I enjoyed Fred L. Pincus' commentary, "We cannot give in to bigotry" (May 30). In his second paragraph he stated that "after seeing two young black men walking toward me" he asked the question, "should I have crossed the street?" He chose to keep walking toward them and to be politically correct - and then robbed with a gun held to his head. While he says he has taught his students there is a grain of truth in racial stereotypes, he did not follow his own gut feeling to avoid the possible problem by crossing the street.
NEWS
By Fred L. Pincus | May 29, 2014
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban's controversial comments about walking across the street if he saw a young black man wearing a hoodie coming toward him late at night got me to thinking about an experience I had 30 years ago. One night while walking from my Charles Village home to my car, I noticed two young black men walking toward me. It was very dark since the street light had blown out. Should I cross the street? I asked myself, concluding that such a move would be racist since they had just as much right to the sidewalk as I did. I continued walking.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Thanks for your article on the Michael Dunn case, in which a white Florida man shot and killed a 17-year-old black teen after getting into an argument over the boy's so-called "thug" music ( "The war that never ends," Feb. 18). I have worked with young men of color who were continually perceived as thugs, even while they worked to improve their community. We must continue to work for justice. Tammy Thomas - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Actor Chazz Palminteri performed his one-man show, "A Bronx Tale," based on the 1993 film of the same name (which was, itself, based on the very same original one-man show), in Baltimore on Sunday ( "The 18 sides of Chazz Palminteri," Nov. 15). Its chief selling point, for most people, is the sense of "nostalgia" it seems to awaken, particularly among Italian Americans who grew up in mostly Italian neighborhoods in our nation's cities (e.g., Baltimore's Little Italy). As our Roman ancestors would have said, however, caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)
NEWS
By Jeffrey Ian Ross | November 10, 2013
Every major cultural, ethnic and racial group in the United States sets aside time to celebrate its heritage and accomplishments. Some notable occasions like Christmas, Hanukkah or Kwanza serve as reminders that we are a pastiche of nations and histories, bound together by our democratic values and our mutual respect for identity and systems of belief. But what of our country's oldest, arguably most deeply rooted group - American Indians and Alaskan Natives? What do we know about native heritage?
NEWS
August 19, 2013
There is no empirical support for the recent commentary claiming that welfare benefits are discouraging people from jobs ("In Maryland, it pays not to work," Aug. 14). The opinion piece is disingenuous and its recommendations are reckless. Tighten eligibility? Empirical data show that upward of 60 percent of all Maryland cash assistance applications are denied. Toughen work rules? Non-compliance with Maryland work rules stops cash grants. Reduce benefit levels? The maximum monthly cash grant for a Maryland family of three is $576, about 35 percent of the federal poverty level.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
One in a series of occasional articles. Hearses enter the six-story building in West Baltimore through garage doors that snap open and shut quickly, to keep business discreet. Researchers who work across from the $43 million Forensic Medical Center catch glimpses of the drop-offs. They call the state-of-the-art center on the edge of the University of Maryland BioPark "the Bat Cave. " The morgue - shrouded in myth, misrepresented on screen - typically is portrayed as a dark, dank basement with sexy forensic investigators peering into microscopes, eccentric doctors weighing body parts, and officials pulling open refrigerated drawers, unzipping body bags and asking spouses: "Is this your husband?"
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