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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 15, 1999
Just when you thought "The Silence of the Lambs" had spawned its last exploitative knock-off, along comes "In Dreams," a sick little vehicle for several actors who should know better.Annette Bening plays a children's book illustrator who is being haunted by premonitory dreams wherein little girls are being abducted by a redheaded stranger who is not Willie Nelson. When her visions begin to come true, hitting fatally close to home, she enters a world of teasing paranoia we haven't seen since "Gaslight" and a mental institution that might just have been vacated by Susan Hayward.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
I can't remember the last time real-life events recontextualized a work of fiction for me the way Israel's incursion into Gaza has done with "The Honorable Woman" this month. When I first started watching the BBC-made mini-series that starts at 10 p.m. Thursday on the Sundance Channel, I liked almost everything about it -- except Maggie Gyllenhaal. And that was a big problem, because she is the star, playing an Anglo-Israeli businesswoman, Nessa Stein, heavily involved in Middle East philanthropy and politics.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 5, 1993
Behaviour," which opens today at the Charles for a week, reminded me a great deal of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts." Same subject: the beautiful banality of real life. Same idea: follow the tangled concerns of a group of people geographically unit"Bad Behaviour," which opens today at the Charles for a week, reminded me a great deal of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts." Same subject: the beautiful banality of real life. Same idea: follow the tangled concerns of a group of people geographically united but spiritually separated as they criss and cross through each other's lives.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2008
Screenwriter John Strysik could have written the script for Stuck on Post-Its. It slaps endless reminders of social significance over the fictionalized case of a female driver who hit a pedestrian and left him snagged and disabled in her windshield. In Stuck, the woman is Brandi (Mena Suvari), a nursing aide on the eve of a promotion at an assisted-living home. The man is Tom (Stephen Rea), a former member of the middle class who is struggling to keep his collar white though he's just been tossed from a fleabag hotel.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2008
Screenwriter John Strysik could have written the script for Stuck on Post-Its. It slaps endless reminders of social significance over the fictionalized case of a female driver who hit a pedestrian and left him snagged and disabled in her windshield. In Stuck, the woman is Brandi (Mena Suvari), a nursing aide on the eve of a promotion at an assisted-living home. The man is Tom (Stephen Rea), a former member of the middle class who is struggling to keep his collar white though he's just been tossed from a fleabag hotel.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
Electronic music may come across as cold and unemotional to some, but as filmmaker Iara Lee's documentary "Modulations" bears out, it's anything but.A marvelous film that captures the joy, creativity and innovation behind electronic music, or electronica, "Modulations" serves as the perfect introduction to a world of sounds limited only by the musicians' imagination -- and some of these musicians have tremendous imaginations.Tracing its origins back to John Cale's compositions of the 1930s, electronica comes across as far more than just blips, squeals and squeaks; anyone who's ever seen "The Day the Earth Stood Still" and marveled at the eerie soundtrack, or sat in wonder listening to the range of sounds produced by a Moog synthesizer, already knows how hypnotic electronic music can be.But "Modulations," playing through tomorrow at the Charles, takes us behind the music and introduces us to the faces responsible for it, from Cale and Miles Davis to Kraftwerk, Giorgio Moroder and Afrika Bambaataa.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
I can't remember the last time real-life events recontextualized a work of fiction for me the way Israel's incursion into Gaza has done with "The Honorable Woman" this month. When I first started watching the BBC-made mini-series that starts at 10 p.m. Thursday on the Sundance Channel, I liked almost everything about it -- except Maggie Gyllenhaal. And that was a big problem, because she is the star, playing an Anglo-Israeli businesswoman, Nessa Stein, heavily involved in Middle East philanthropy and politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 11, 1994
"Interview with the Vampire" does seem to have discovered something like the secret of eternal life. At least when you leave the theater, you feel as if you've been in it for a thousand years.Derived from the beloved first novel by mistress of the dark Anne Rice, it unfortunately seems a work primarily intended for Rice Krispies -- that is, people who've already had their brains toasted by reading too much Anne Rice.They'll at least get it. The movie's fundamental flaw, from an outsider's point of view, possibly stems from the fact that Rice wrote the screen adaption, under the assumption that her viewers would be familiar with the original text and that her main thrust should be to get as much of the book into the film as possible.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 3, 2002
You're a young, good-looking insurance adjuster who's making huge bucks and more or less has life in London by the tail when one day you show up for a routine interview and the guy you were supposed to meet is hanging from a water pipe. Take note, this is not a good omen. That's what happens to Lorimer Black (James Frain) in Armadillo, an A&E adaptation of William Boyd's best seller, and Black's life rapidly starts deconstructing from the moment he sees the corpse. Black, full of the arrogance of youth and boundless energy of a young man on the make, is one of the last to notice the downward spiral.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
It's too kind to say that Proud tells the story of the only black sailors to take a warship - the USS Mason - into combat during World War II. Storytelling is not the strong suit of the writer-director, Mary Pat Kelly. She must be commended for bringing the facts of this amazing tale to light. But the most I can say about Proud is that it made me want to see the documentary she also created on the subject, Proudly We Served: The Men of the USS Mason, and to read the book of the same title that she put together with the surviving crew members.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 3, 2002
You're a young, good-looking insurance adjuster who's making huge bucks and more or less has life in London by the tail when one day you show up for a routine interview and the guy you were supposed to meet is hanging from a water pipe. Take note, this is not a good omen. That's what happens to Lorimer Black (James Frain) in Armadillo, an A&E adaptation of William Boyd's best seller, and Black's life rapidly starts deconstructing from the moment he sees the corpse. Black, full of the arrogance of youth and boundless energy of a young man on the make, is one of the last to notice the downward spiral.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
Electronic music may come across as cold and unemotional to some, but as filmmaker Iara Lee's documentary "Modulations" bears out, it's anything but.A marvelous film that captures the joy, creativity and innovation behind electronic music, or electronica, "Modulations" serves as the perfect introduction to a world of sounds limited only by the musicians' imagination -- and some of these musicians have tremendous imaginations.Tracing its origins back to John Cale's compositions of the 1930s, electronica comes across as far more than just blips, squeals and squeaks; anyone who's ever seen "The Day the Earth Stood Still" and marveled at the eerie soundtrack, or sat in wonder listening to the range of sounds produced by a Moog synthesizer, already knows how hypnotic electronic music can be.But "Modulations," playing through tomorrow at the Charles, takes us behind the music and introduces us to the faces responsible for it, from Cale and Miles Davis to Kraftwerk, Giorgio Moroder and Afrika Bambaataa.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 15, 1999
Just when you thought "The Silence of the Lambs" had spawned its last exploitative knock-off, along comes "In Dreams," a sick little vehicle for several actors who should know better.Annette Bening plays a children's book illustrator who is being haunted by premonitory dreams wherein little girls are being abducted by a redheaded stranger who is not Willie Nelson. When her visions begin to come true, hitting fatally close to home, she enters a world of teasing paranoia we haven't seen since "Gaslight" and a mental institution that might just have been vacated by Susan Hayward.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 11, 1994
"Interview with the Vampire" does seem to have discovered something like the secret of eternal life. At least when you leave the theater, you feel as if you've been in it for a thousand years.Derived from the beloved first novel by mistress of the dark Anne Rice, it unfortunately seems a work primarily intended for Rice Krispies -- that is, people who've already had their brains toasted by reading too much Anne Rice.They'll at least get it. The movie's fundamental flaw, from an outsider's point of view, possibly stems from the fact that Rice wrote the screen adaption, under the assumption that her viewers would be familiar with the original text and that her main thrust should be to get as much of the book into the film as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 5, 1993
Behaviour," which opens today at the Charles for a week, reminded me a great deal of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts." Same subject: the beautiful banality of real life. Same idea: follow the tangled concerns of a group of people geographically unit"Bad Behaviour," which opens today at the Charles for a week, reminded me a great deal of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts." Same subject: the beautiful banality of real life. Same idea: follow the tangled concerns of a group of people geographically united but spiritually separated as they criss and cross through each other's lives.
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By Manohla Dargis and Manohla Dargis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2002
One of the great guilty pleasures of moviegoing is watching a film you expect to be bad turn out to be spectacularly bad. A horror movie that puts its own spin on the word "howler," feardotcom opens with a cameo from Udo Kier, a character actor whose presence usually portends either something pretty good (as when he's in a Lars von Trier film) or something pretty awful (take your pick, Barb Wire or The Adventures of Pinocchio. Clutching a book to his body and rolling his bloodshot eyes, Kier stumbles across a sound stage that's desperately trying to pass itself off as a New York subway platform and desperately failing.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
As a cheerful Irish transvestite named Patrick "Kitten" Braden who swishes his/her way through the Troubles of the 1960s and '70s, Cillian Murphy is the least draggy drag star imaginable - he makes the transsexual hero of Hedwig and the Angry Inch look downright downbeat in comparison. Kitten is the son of a priest (Liam Neeson) who couldn't resist the Mitzi Gaynor-like good looks of his housekeeper (Eva Birthistle). Left on the priest's doorstep, then placed in a loveless foster home, Kitten can't keep his hands off his stepmom's and stepsister's clothing while dreaming of meeting his real mother.
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