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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Word from Hollywood is that former Baltimore Sun and Washington Post movie critic Stephen Hunter's 1995 novel, "Dirty White Boys," will be the next project for David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the pair behind HBO's hugely successful "Game of Thrones. " Deadline: Hollywood reports that Benioff and Weiss have made a deal with Fox to write, direct and produce the movie adaptation of Hunter's novel, the story of a trio of violent prison escapees, led by the anti-heroic Lamar Pye, being pursued by a dogged state trooper.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Word from Hollywood is that former Baltimore Sun and Washington Post movie critic Stephen Hunter's 1995 novel, "Dirty White Boys," will be the next project for David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the pair behind HBO's hugely successful "Game of Thrones. " Deadline: Hollywood reports that Benioff and Weiss have made a deal with Fox to write, direct and produce the movie adaptation of Hunter's novel, the story of a trio of violent prison escapees, led by the anti-heroic Lamar Pye, being pursued by a dogged state trooper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In his new thriller, "The Third Bullet," novelist Stephen Hunter sets his sights on an American tragedy that's also the most famous gun mystery of all time - the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The questions surrounding the shooting as JFK rode in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have never been fully put to rest. And the controversy is certain to intensify as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches this fall. As the novelist tells it, the decision to enlist his fictitious super-sniper, Bob Lee Swagger, to determine whether the gunman acted alone or as part of a conspiracy began as a joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In his new thriller, "The Third Bullet," novelist Stephen Hunter sets his sights on an American tragedy that's also the most famous gun mystery of all time - the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The questions surrounding the shooting as JFK rode in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have never been fully put to rest. And the controversy is certain to intensify as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches this fall. As the novelist tells it, the decision to enlist his fictitious super-sniper, Bob Lee Swagger, to determine whether the gunman acted alone or as part of a conspiracy began as a joke.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | March 11, 2007
STANDING INSIDE THE SHOOTING gallery of On Target in Severn is like crouching inside the mouth of a mythical beast. The ceiling and walls are covered with jagged rocks resembling teeth, and the floor is littered with something that appears to be cracked seeds. On closer inspection, the "seeds" turn out to be spent shell casings, and they emit small, seductive flashes of gold. Stephen Hunter picks up a fresh cartridge and loads it into the magazine of his Glock 9 mm. "These put holes in things," he says.
NEWS
May 21, 1994
Because of a production error, the rating of the movie "Maverick" was incorrect in yesterday's Maryland Live section. Stephen Hunter had rated it a 2 1/2 -star movie.The Sun regrets the errors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By From Staff Reports | July 7, 1995
Cinema Sundays at the Charles will continue this Sunday with a look at a Hong Kong thriller with a wicked premise. The screening, at 10:30 a.m., will be introduced by Stephen Hunter, The Sun's movie critic.The screening is the second in a three-film miniseries at the downtown art theater, with the final showing set for July 16.The series promises high-quality art-house films weeks before their commercial release, although titles are never announced in advance. Some previous films in the series have been "Crumb," "Martha and Ellen," "Firinelli" and "Burnt by the Sun."
FEATURES
March 13, 1994
Will this be the year Steven Spielberg breaks through and wins big at the Academy Awards? Do you think "Schindler's List" will sweep? Can Angela Bassett snatch the best actress Oscar from favorite Holly Hunter?Rarely have Oscar races appeared more predictable than many of the categories to be presented March 21. But the unpredictable sometimes happens.Who do you think will win? The Sun is offering readers the chance to match wits with the academy's voters -- and Sun film critic Stephen Hunter -- in an Oscar poll.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | August 7, 1996
Stephen Hunter is in the eye of the swarm."We noticed a certain buzz gathering around the guy," said Will Dana, senior editor of Rolling Stone.Hunter, The Sun's film critic, has been named Hot Author of the year by Rolling Stone. The best-selling author's latest thriller is "Black Light." Two of his other books, "Dirty White Boys" and "Point of Impact," are Hollywood-bound."I suppose I was formed by too many movies and too much television," Hunter says in the Aug. 22 issue of Rolling Stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2003
Havana, by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 416 pages. $24.95 Preparing to eat a cockroach he won playing cards, a cadaverous prisoner in Stalin's frozen Siberian Gulag muses that the roach would be delicious sauteed en beurre with a complex red wine, perhaps a St. Emilion `34 or `35. "Why red?" he asks himself, and then answers: "Because red goes with meat. A cockroach certainly [isn't] fish, of that you may be sure." With that savory bit of whimsy, Stephen Hunter introduces Comrade Speshnev, a brilliant and impishly unpredictable Communist revolutionary who is sprung from the Gulag in 1953 and dispatched to Cuba.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2008
Night of Thunder by Stephen Hunter Simon & Schuster / 304 pages / $26 With his white hair and unsteady gait, 63-year-old Bob Lee Swagger seems like a bumbling old man, certainly no match for the armed robbers and murderers he finds in NASCAR country. But in Stephen Hunter's latest thriller, Night of Thunder (in stores Sept. 23), nothing is what it seems. Known for his cinematic language, action-packed suspense and multifaceted characters, Hunter delivers all three in his latest. Formerly of The Baltimore Sun, Hunter, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post film critic and best-selling author, writes page-turners pumped with muscular verbs as in "It was Iron Mountain, and 421 slashed crookedly up its angry hump."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | March 11, 2007
STANDING INSIDE THE SHOOTING gallery of On Target in Severn is like crouching inside the mouth of a mythical beast. The ceiling and walls are covered with jagged rocks resembling teeth, and the floor is littered with something that appears to be cracked seeds. On closer inspection, the "seeds" turn out to be spent shell casings, and they emit small, seductive flashes of gold. Stephen Hunter picks up a fresh cartridge and loads it into the magazine of his Glock 9 mm. "These put holes in things," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Marston and David Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2003
Havana, by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 416 pages. $24.95 Preparing to eat a cockroach he won playing cards, a cadaverous prisoner in Stalin's frozen Siberian Gulag muses that the roach would be delicious sauteed en beurre with a complex red wine, perhaps a St. Emilion `34 or `35. "Why red?" he asks himself, and then answers: "Because red goes with meat. A cockroach certainly [isn't] fish, of that you may be sure." With that savory bit of whimsy, Stephen Hunter introduces Comrade Speshnev, a brilliant and impishly unpredictable Communist revolutionary who is sprung from the Gulag in 1953 and dispatched to Cuba.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
Pale Horse Coming, by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 491 pages. $25. Fallout from the terrible reality of Sept. 11 could thankfully turn away tastes for shoot-'em-up torture thrillers of the sort produced by Stephen Hunter, poet laureate of the NRA. Who now needs fiction featuring outsized terrorists gleefully wreaking carnage upon mythical objects of hate? Bad as bigotry may have been back then, Pale Horse Coming, set in the deep South of 1951, presents historic fictions that will tweak the most credulous believers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
"Hot Springs," by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 478 pages. $25. Don't tell the Million Moms, but Stephen Hunter's gun-crazy Swagger boys are back, setting a very bad example on the gun issue. Tommy guns, .45 automatics, Winchester 97 shotguns, M-1 carbines and even Browning automatics are all cheerfully blazing away in Hunter's latest thriller, in a running series of bloody shoot-em-ups. "Hot Springs" is set in 1946. Marine Medal of Honor winner Earl Swagger, son of brutal, race-baiting Sheriff Charles Swagger, has been picked to lead an elite secret team to clean up that legendary Arkansas fleshpot.
FEATURES
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
Herewith, the second installment of 1998's books for the general reader - books that were about Maryland or by one or more Marylanders.(O) means oversize; (P) means paperboundEducation"Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African-American Males," by Freeman Hrabowski, Kenneth I. Maton and Geoffrey L. Greif (Oxford, 240 pages, $17.50) Important suggestions."Distance Training: How Innovative Organizations Are Using Technology to Maximize Learning and Meet Business Objectives," by Zane L. Berge and Deborah A. Schreiber (Jessey-Bass, 448 pages, $34.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
"Hot Springs," by Stephen Hunter. Simon & Schuster. 478 pages. $25. Don't tell the Million Moms, but Stephen Hunter's gun-crazy Swagger boys are back, setting a very bad example on the gun issue. Tommy guns, .45 automatics, Winchester 97 shotguns, M-1 carbines and even Browning automatics are all cheerfully blazing away in Hunter's latest thriller, in a running series of bloody shoot-em-ups. "Hot Springs" is set in 1946. Marine Medal of Honor winner Earl Swagger, son of brutal, race-baiting Sheriff Charles Swagger, has been picked to lead an elite secret team to clean up that legendary Arkansas fleshpot.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 23, 1992
THEATERA 'Lesson' to Be LearnedThe Pulitzer Prize-winning family drama "The Piano Lesson," currently at the Mechanic Theatre, is the 1930s installment of August Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of black life in 20th century America. A moving and important work by one of the country's pre-eminent playwrights, the play uses an heirloom piano as a central symbol to explore the question of the proper use of a legacy. The ensemble cast in this touring production is as tightly knit as its Broadway predecessor.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 5, 1998
TODAY, READERS, I will feature reaction from some of you to my column about that despicable dreck of a movie "Gone With the Wind."Susan Fanske of Ellicott City wrote:GWTW "should be interpreted and left for the literary work that it is, a love story taking place with the Civil War as a background. I think it is no more historically correct than James Cameron's 'Titanic,' which is also a love story first. Please don't read more into the story than what is there and let the author have his/her own literary license."
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 23, 1997
May I have the envelope, please? Thank you, my dear. By the way, don't you look lovely tonight and what are you doing after the ceremony? Anyhow, for best picture, the winner isBut I'm getting ahead of myself.Let us play the game according to the rules. Let us take our long, slow, cute stroll to the climax of the 69th annual Oscar ceremony, predicting hither and yon as we meander. (Channels 2 and 7 will broadcast the awards show at 9 p.m. tomorrow.) And let's obey some other rules, too. Kids, repeat after me: Rules Are Fun. So, let's play the fashion rule game, by painting a picture of the host of our ceremony in high Oscar splendor.
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