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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
In the opening moments of Shattered Glass, the new movie about the colorful reporter whose fabricated stories wreaked havoc on The New Republic in the mid-1990s, there's a reference to All The President's Men, the Watergate film that made heroes of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. A young New Republic staffer telephones the political and cultural magazine's editor, Charles Lane, to warn him that the young Stephen Glass may be cracking under scrutiny. The call is made from a parking lot in the nation's capital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
I am a fan of Ira Glass and "This American Life. " In fact, I am such a fan, I have been sitting here for four days hoping someone else would write this piece. But no one is apparently. So, here goes. Let me preface it by saying maybe I am so out of step with most of my colleagues because I have been teaching Media Ethics for the past 15 years at an area college. (In fact. Glass is speaking at commencement for the school in May.) But while Mike Daisey deserves all the pounding and then some that he is taking in the press for his lies, I am troubled by how many of my colleagues are mostly giving Glass a pass for his gatekeeping failure in putting Daisey's work on the air in the first place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 8, 2004
Shattered Glass, a drama based on the web of lies spun by disgraced New Republic reporter Stephen Glass, started out as a very different film. "I thought there was an opportunity here for a satire," says writer-director Billy Ray, hired by HBO Films to write and direct the movie, working off an article that first appeared in Vanity Fair. "I thought, this could be like Network." But pretty soon, Ray stopped seeing the humor in what Glass had done - not so much because of any crimes against journalism, of which the once-respected writer, who fabricated all or part of dozens of stories, was certainly guilty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 8, 2004
Shattered Glass, a drama based on the web of lies spun by disgraced New Republic reporter Stephen Glass, started out as a very different film. "I thought there was an opportunity here for a satire," says writer-director Billy Ray, hired by HBO Films to write and direct the movie, working off an article that first appeared in Vanity Fair. "I thought, this could be like Network." But pretty soon, Ray stopped seeing the humor in what Glass had done - not so much because of any crimes against journalism, of which the once-respected writer, who fabricated all or part of dozens of stories, was certainly guilty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
I am a fan of Ira Glass and "This American Life. " In fact, I am such a fan, I have been sitting here for four days hoping someone else would write this piece. But no one is apparently. So, here goes. Let me preface it by saying maybe I am so out of step with most of my colleagues because I have been teaching Media Ethics for the past 15 years at an area college. (In fact. Glass is speaking at commencement for the school in May.) But while Mike Daisey deserves all the pounding and then some that he is taking in the press for his lies, I am troubled by how many of my colleagues are mostly giving Glass a pass for his gatekeeping failure in putting Daisey's work on the air in the first place.
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | May 18, 2003
WHILE INTERVIEWING for a job teaching journalism ethics at the University of Maryland in 1999, I fielded questions from a student representative called in to assess me, one Jayson Blair. Mr. Blair was poised to begin his first full-time reporting job, not at the Frederick Post or Montgomery Gazette but at the lofty New York Times. He was confident, witty, charming and charismatic. He seemed oh so serious about ethics. Talk about appearances being deceiving. His recently exposed spree of fabrication and plagiarism in the Times has done to journalism what the 1919 Chicago Black Sox scandal did to baseball.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 21, 2003
Shattered Glass traces the giddy rise and gaudy fall of Stephen Glass (Hayden Christensen), who achieved infamy in the scandal-charged journalistic world of the last decade by penning dozens of purportedly factual articles for The New Republic that turned out to be pure or partial fiction. While homing in on Glass, the movie exposes the drift of an entire media culture that lusts for youth and "freshness" (i.e., novelty) and desires to be entertained and entertaining at all costs. Journalism has always been vulnerable to the excesses of arrested adolescents who seek attention with extreme styles and opinions or who yearn for the validation of escalating bylines and Page 1 scoops.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
CLARIFICATION An article in Saturday's editions about former New Republic writer Stephen Glass imprecisely characterized the sentiments of the magazine's former editor, Charles Lane. Although Lane did criticize Simon & Schuster, publisher of Glass' new novel, he did not directly criticize CBS. At age 23, Stephen Glass was writing attention-grabbing articles about politics and pop culture for The New Republic filled with such fresh description and playful detail that the words seemed fairly to leap off the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2003
"It was extremely painful and difficult to watch. There were large chunks of it, or at least significant chunks of it, that I looked at the ground, I didn't look at the screen."-- Fabricating writer Stephen Glass, on the new film Shattered Glass
NEWS
May 13, 2003
An article in Sunday's editions may have created an erroneous impression about the origin of the Baltimore Community Foundation. It was founded in 1972 by several Baltimore banks, but was boosted to its current structure and size by contributions of money and staff from the Goldseker Foundation. An article in Saturday's editions about former New Republic writer Stephen Glass imprecisely characterized the sentiments of the magazine's former editor, Charles Lane. Although Lane did criticize Simon & Schuster, publisher of Glass' new novel, he did not directly criticize CBS.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 21, 2003
Shattered Glass traces the giddy rise and gaudy fall of Stephen Glass (Hayden Christensen), who achieved infamy in the scandal-charged journalistic world of the last decade by penning dozens of purportedly factual articles for The New Republic that turned out to be pure or partial fiction. While homing in on Glass, the movie exposes the drift of an entire media culture that lusts for youth and "freshness" (i.e., novelty) and desires to be entertained and entertaining at all costs. Journalism has always been vulnerable to the excesses of arrested adolescents who seek attention with extreme styles and opinions or who yearn for the validation of escalating bylines and Page 1 scoops.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
In the opening moments of Shattered Glass, the new movie about the colorful reporter whose fabricated stories wreaked havoc on The New Republic in the mid-1990s, there's a reference to All The President's Men, the Watergate film that made heroes of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. A young New Republic staffer telephones the political and cultural magazine's editor, Charles Lane, to warn him that the young Stephen Glass may be cracking under scrutiny. The call is made from a parking lot in the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | May 18, 2003
WHILE INTERVIEWING for a job teaching journalism ethics at the University of Maryland in 1999, I fielded questions from a student representative called in to assess me, one Jayson Blair. Mr. Blair was poised to begin his first full-time reporting job, not at the Frederick Post or Montgomery Gazette but at the lofty New York Times. He was confident, witty, charming and charismatic. He seemed oh so serious about ethics. Talk about appearances being deceiving. His recently exposed spree of fabrication and plagiarism in the Times has done to journalism what the 1919 Chicago Black Sox scandal did to baseball.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
CLARIFICATION An article in Saturday's editions about former New Republic writer Stephen Glass imprecisely characterized the sentiments of the magazine's former editor, Charles Lane. Although Lane did criticize Simon & Schuster, publisher of Glass' new novel, he did not directly criticize CBS. At age 23, Stephen Glass was writing attention-grabbing articles about politics and pop culture for The New Republic filled with such fresh description and playful detail that the words seemed fairly to leap off the page.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
Cheaters never prosper, the old adage goes. But Winona Ryder, Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair might beg to differ. All three can tell you that sometimes crime pays. After appearing in court dressed in fashion label Marc Jacobs' clothes to face charges of shoplifting a Marc Jacobs top, among other items, Ryder has now modeled for the designer. Stephen Glass, a former writer for The New Republic, Rolling Stone, Harper's and George magazines, was discovered in 1998 to be fabricating his articles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 18, 2003
Last Sunday, four full pages of The New York Times boiled forth the offenses of its reporter Jayson Blair. The articles specified "journalistic fraud" in at least 36 of the last 73 dispatches Blair wrote for the newspaper. It reported that 13 months before Blair was caught and fired, after repeated published admissions of error had retracted elements of his stories, metropolitan editor Jonathan Landman had sent his bosses a message that said "We have to stop Jayson from writing for the Times.
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