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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 3, 2002
In Deuces Wild, a '50s gangster film, director Scott Kalvert (Basketball Diaries) tells a coming-of-age story with a tone that varies between nostalgia and regret. If only it didn't make you feel such a strong sense of regret for having watched it. Our heroes are Leon (Stephen Dorff), the relatively even-tempered leader of the Deuces, and Bobby (Brad Renfro), his fearless, hot-tempered brother. A third brother, Allie Boy, suffered a drug-related death three years before the main action.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
Even fans of Quentin Tarantino's gonzo gangsterism may find Shadowboxer to be a neo-noir novelty act worthy of rotten green tomatoes. Lee Daniels is a highly regarded indie producer with credits such as Monster's Ball and The Woodsman behind him. This movie about the humanity of paid assassins has enough gloss, pace and picturesque Philadelphia locations to suggest that he might have a career as a director in front of him. But he won't have much of...
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By Manohla Dargis and Manohla Dargis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2002
One of the great guilty pleasures of moviegoing is watching a film you expect to be bad turn out to be spectacularly bad. A horror movie that puts its own spin on the word "howler," feardotcom opens with a cameo from Udo Kier, a character actor whose presence usually portends either something pretty good (as when he's in a Lars von Trier film) or something pretty awful (take your pick, Barb Wire or The Adventures of Pinocchio. Clutching a book to his body and rolling his bloodshot eyes, Kier stumbles across a sound stage that's desperately trying to pass itself off as a New York subway platform and desperately failing.
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By Manohla Dargis and Manohla Dargis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2002
One of the great guilty pleasures of moviegoing is watching a film you expect to be bad turn out to be spectacularly bad. A horror movie that puts its own spin on the word "howler," feardotcom opens with a cameo from Udo Kier, a character actor whose presence usually portends either something pretty good (as when he's in a Lars von Trier film) or something pretty awful (take your pick, Barb Wire or The Adventures of Pinocchio. Clutching a book to his body and rolling his bloodshot eyes, Kier stumbles across a sound stage that's desperately trying to pass itself off as a New York subway platform and desperately failing.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
In "Backbeat," the Beatles discover that life is a cabaret, old chum.The movie, set largely in Hamburg in 1961, when they were just another scrubby bar band, chronicles the twisted relationship between John Lennon (played by Ian Hart, who also played him in "The Hours and Times") and legendary "fifth Beatle" Stu Sutcliffe.Sutcliffe (Stephen Dorff) is represented as some kind of avatar of artistic liberation whose charisma uniquely mesmerized Lennon, though the other band members -- George, Paul and Pete (no Ringo yet)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
Even fans of Quentin Tarantino's gonzo gangsterism may find Shadowboxer to be a neo-noir novelty act worthy of rotten green tomatoes. Lee Daniels is a highly regarded indie producer with credits such as Monster's Ball and The Woodsman behind him. This movie about the humanity of paid assassins has enough gloss, pace and picturesque Philadelphia locations to suggest that he might have a career as a director in front of him. But he won't have much of...
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Melanie Griffith, stick thin, all in black, a dazzling diamond crucifix against her throat, is right here in front of Planet Hollywood at the Inner Harbor.You'd think this would be the ultimate glam fix for the nearly 400 stargazers clustered by the stage and gawking from store windows and staircases.So, why is a mouthy band of fans asking for her hot Latin husband, Antonio Banderas?"You want Antonio?" the movie star asks in her baby bird voice. Yes, it is her real voice."I want Antonio too, believe me," she says with a smile almost as bright as the mango-sized diamonds in her ears.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 14, 1997
Their great movies may be decades behind them, but god bless Jack Nicholson and Bob Rafelson, who still make good movies."Blood & Wine" is just that: Pretty good. It's nothing that will haunt as did their seminal previous collaborations "Five Easy Pieces" or "The King of Marvin Gardens" but something that feels dark, troubling, entirely professional.The film, a caper-driven film noir set in the upscale Florida merchant class, has a '70s feel to it, as if Rafelson, who did his best work back then, has said to hell with the racier editing rhythms and advanced pyrotechnics of the '90s.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
The first major-budget film to be released exclusively on the Internet has it all: Talking protons, women playing accordions, VW Beetles being struck by lightning, walking drink glasses, you name it. "Quantum Project," a fictional exercise in love and relative physics that made its Web debut at midnight Thursday, could prove an intriguing piece of moviemaking; with a reported budget of some $3 million and a cast that includes Stephen Dorff ("Backbeat"),...
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 2000
In "Cecil B. Demented," the latest offering from Baltimore director John Waters, an underground filmmaker (Stephen Dorff) kidnaps a big Hollywood star (Melanie Griffith) and forces her to appear in his next flick. After spending time with the soundtrack album, you might wonder why he didn't grab a few pop stars while he was at it. The songs on "Cecil B. Demented: Music from the Motion Picture" (RCA Victor 09026-63722, arriving in stores today) aren't just noisy and annoying; they're amateurishly so, drawing on rap and club music, thrash and noise rock without doing any of them well.
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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 3, 2002
In Deuces Wild, a '50s gangster film, director Scott Kalvert (Basketball Diaries) tells a coming-of-age story with a tone that varies between nostalgia and regret. If only it didn't make you feel such a strong sense of regret for having watched it. Our heroes are Leon (Stephen Dorff), the relatively even-tempered leader of the Deuces, and Bobby (Brad Renfro), his fearless, hot-tempered brother. A third brother, Allie Boy, suffered a drug-related death three years before the main action.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 2000
In "Cecil B. Demented," the latest offering from Baltimore director John Waters, an underground filmmaker (Stephen Dorff) kidnaps a big Hollywood star (Melanie Griffith) and forces her to appear in his next flick. After spending time with the soundtrack album, you might wonder why he didn't grab a few pop stars while he was at it. The songs on "Cecil B. Demented: Music from the Motion Picture" (RCA Victor 09026-63722, arriving in stores today) aren't just noisy and annoying; they're amateurishly so, drawing on rap and club music, thrash and noise rock without doing any of them well.
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By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2000
CANNES, France -- John Waters ducked into a Mercedes on his way to a luncheon with film distributors last week, and a blast of heat bounced off the leather seat like the Beltway in July. When the driver informed him that the air conditioning wasn't working, Waters says with a hint of indignation, "Let's not get this car again." John Waters in a Mercedes? In a Mercedes driven by a chauffeur? A Mercedes that wasn't up to his standards? It seems an unlikely pairing. But Waters will be the first to tell you that the irony is over.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
The first major-budget film to be released exclusively on the Internet has it all: Talking protons, women playing accordions, VW Beetles being struck by lightning, walking drink glasses, you name it. "Quantum Project," a fictional exercise in love and relative physics that made its Web debut at midnight Thursday, could prove an intriguing piece of moviemaking; with a reported budget of some $3 million and a cast that includes Stephen Dorff ("Backbeat"),...
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Melanie Griffith, stick thin, all in black, a dazzling diamond crucifix against her throat, is right here in front of Planet Hollywood at the Inner Harbor.You'd think this would be the ultimate glam fix for the nearly 400 stargazers clustered by the stage and gawking from store windows and staircases.So, why is a mouthy band of fans asking for her hot Latin husband, Antonio Banderas?"You want Antonio?" the movie star asks in her baby bird voice. Yes, it is her real voice."I want Antonio too, believe me," she says with a smile almost as bright as the mango-sized diamonds in her ears.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 14, 1997
Their great movies may be decades behind them, but god bless Jack Nicholson and Bob Rafelson, who still make good movies."Blood & Wine" is just that: Pretty good. It's nothing that will haunt as did their seminal previous collaborations "Five Easy Pieces" or "The King of Marvin Gardens" but something that feels dark, troubling, entirely professional.The film, a caper-driven film noir set in the upscale Florida merchant class, has a '70s feel to it, as if Rafelson, who did his best work back then, has said to hell with the racier editing rhythms and advanced pyrotechnics of the '90s.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2000
CANNES, France -- John Waters ducked into a Mercedes on his way to a luncheon with film distributors last week, and a blast of heat bounced off the leather seat like the Beltway in July. When the driver informed him that the air conditioning wasn't working, Waters says with a hint of indignation, "Let's not get this car again." John Waters in a Mercedes? In a Mercedes driven by a chauffeur? A Mercedes that wasn't up to his standards? It seems an unlikely pairing. But Waters will be the first to tell you that the irony is over.
FEATURES
July 21, 2000
Tickets for the Hollywood-style opening of John Waters' new film, "Cecil B. Demented," scheduled for Aug. 2 at the Senator, go on sale today. Filmed in Baltimore last year, "Cecil B. Demented" stars Stephen Dorff as the title character, a guerrilla filmmaker determined to make movies on his own terms, movies that not only buck the Hollywood system, but will lead to the destruction of Hollywood as we know it. Melanie Griffith plays a big-time star who...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 22, 1994
In "Backbeat," the Beatles discover that life is a cabaret, old chum.The movie, set largely in Hamburg in 1961, when they were just another scrubby bar band, chronicles the twisted relationship between John Lennon (played by Ian Hart, who also played him in "The Hours and Times") and legendary "fifth Beatle" Stu Sutcliffe.Sutcliffe (Stephen Dorff) is represented as some kind of avatar of artistic liberation whose charisma uniquely mesmerized Lennon, though the other band members -- George, Paul and Pete (no Ringo yet)
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