Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStephen Dixon
IN THE NEWS

Stephen Dixon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1997
"Gould: A Novel in Two Novels," by Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt and Company 227 pages. $24.One hates to be pedantic, but I must point out that Mr. Dixon, a prolific and recognized author, has for some reason refused to use paragraphs in this book. Since a great deal of the book is dialogue, he must divide speech with "and she said, and he said" repeatedly, and, I must add, ad nauseam.I don't mean he uses few paragraphs. He uses virtually no paragraphs. Almost the entire 227 pages is one long screed in which not change of scene, change of time, change of speaker, nor anything you may have become used to, is separated by the convention of an indentation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
The Baltimore novelist and short story writer Stephen Dixon has won a 2014 O. Henry Award for his short story, "Talk. " The annual prize honors 20 of the best short stories each year. Also on this year's list are such well-known national authors as Louise Erdrich and William Trevor. "Talk," which was published in "The American Reader," is a moving portrait of loneliness. In this stream of consciousness monologue, a recent widower realizes that he has gone nearly an entire day without speaking to another human being.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alane Salierno Mason and By Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | May 16, 1999
"30: Pieces of a Novel," by Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt & Co. 672 pages. $30.What defines a writer's writer? Critical acclaim without by popular recognition? Prolific output that evades easy categorization? A great reputation as a teacher of writing? Something in the work? On each of these counts, Stephen Dixon, author of 20 short story collections and novels -- two of which, "Frog" (1991) and "Interstate" (1994) were finalists for the National Book Award -- seems to qualify.His new novel, "30: Pieces of a Novel," has had a subtitle only a writer could love, particularly a writer despairing of turning his or her own "pieces" into a whole.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Loss tunnels through Stephen Dixon's fiction, pushing up his words like so many clods of dirt. Oh, the loss isn't there on the surface, which is flat and smooth and level. The loss isn't present in the spiky, black-footed letters stretching from one end of the page to the next. Instead, readers soon begin to sense ... something. They press an ear to the ground, listen for a rumble. "I teach my readers how to read my work while they're reading it," Dixon says. And, so he does. Readers immersed in Dixon's fictional world learn to delve beneath the sentences to grasp the whole story.
NEWS
By Merrill Leffler | April 17, 1994
In "The Victor," a story about a novelist's jealous reaction at not winning a major fiction prize his book has been nominated for, the writer, Robert Burmeister, is sitting at a table with his wife, his small-press publisher and his editor. The publisher, perhaps trying to ease the sting of losing, asks if Robert will have a new manuscript ready for publication the next year.His wife answers for him: "Don't worry about this guy. Living is writing, writing is living, even the stomach flu along with a death in the family and cramps hardly stop him for a day, so expect one every year and only occasionally every other year, till you yell uncle."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | November 15, 1991
Everything comes at a price, we are told, and for Stephen Dixon it is no different. Being nominated for the National Book Award in fiction is a welcome honor, but he will have to wear a tuxedo.Not that he doesn't appreciate being nominated for "Frog," the 769-page work consisting of three interrelated novels, three novels and 15 short stories, all interrelated. Despite having published five novels and close to 300 short stories, Mr. Dixon, a professor of fiction in the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars since 1980, has labored in relative anonymity for nearly 30 years.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Phone rings. I pick up the receiver, say "Hello." "Hello," says Stephen Dixon. He sounds ... The phone rings after I punch in 10 digits. Brpuppupp. Bruuuuup. Brp. "Hello," someone says. "This is Stephen Dixon. No, it's fine. I can talk now. Just give me a minute, while I hand my wife a shirt." Phone doesn't ring. Why not? I'm sitting at my desk, waiting for Stephen Dixon to call. I drum my fingers. I want to chat about his 25th book. It's called Phone Rings. It's fair to say that Dixon, a critically acclaimed Baltimore author, has a writing style that is easily parodied.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Loss tunnels through Stephen Dixon's fiction, pushing up his words like so many clods of dirt. Oh, the loss isn't there on the surface, which is flat and smooth and level. The loss isn't present in the spiky, black-footed letters stretching from one end of the page to the next. Instead, readers soon begin to sense ... something. They press an ear to the ground, listen for a rumble. "I teach my readers how to read my work while they're reading it," Dixon says. And, so he does. Readers immersed in Dixon's fictional world learn to delve beneath the sentences to grasp the whole story.
NEWS
By HARRY MERRITT and HARRY MERRITT,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Rumspringa: To Be or Not To Be Amish Tom Shachtman THE END OF I. Stephen Dixon McSweeney's / 200 pages / $22 First came I., an acclaimed autobiographical novel by Stephen Dixon, who teaches at the Johns Hopkins University. Now comes The End of I., a sometimes funny, sometimes poignant novel with many of the same themes. In chapters that read as short stories, the narrator discusses his relationships with, among others, his disabled wife, his daughters, mother-in-law and a dying classmate.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 3, 1995
INTERSTATE. By Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt and Co. 374 pages. $25. OVER THE course of 16 works of fiction, Baltimore author Stephen Dixon has constructed a vision of contemporary life that's at once morbid, hysterical and frighteningly true. Mr. Dixon's quirky run-on sentence writing style has earned him the adoration of many of his former students at Johns Hopkins University (this reviewer among them), colleagues in academia and book critics.Yet, although Mr. Dixon has received his share of accolades from the high-brow literary world -- his last novel, the colossal "Frog," received nominations for both the National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award -- his work has only recently started to get the sort of attention that it deserves.
NEWS
By HARRY MERRITT and HARRY MERRITT,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
Rumspringa: To Be or Not To Be Amish Tom Shachtman THE END OF I. Stephen Dixon McSweeney's / 200 pages / $22 First came I., an acclaimed autobiographical novel by Stephen Dixon, who teaches at the Johns Hopkins University. Now comes The End of I., a sometimes funny, sometimes poignant novel with many of the same themes. In chapters that read as short stories, the narrator discusses his relationships with, among others, his disabled wife, his daughters, mother-in-law and a dying classmate.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
Phone Rings Stephen Dixon Melville House / 333 pages. We all dread that one truly terrible phone call, the one that heralds inestimable grief, the one we absolutely know cannot - must not - be true. Stephen Dixon, winner of the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Award, a two-time nominee for the National Book Award and a Baltimorean on the faculty at Johns Hopkins, begins Phone Rings, his 25th work of fiction, with just such a phone call: Manny Fine calls his Uncle Stu to inform him of the accidental death of Dan, Manny's father and Stu's brother.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Phone rings. I pick up the receiver, say "Hello." "Hello," says Stephen Dixon. He sounds ... The phone rings after I punch in 10 digits. Brpuppupp. Bruuuuup. Brp. "Hello," someone says. "This is Stephen Dixon. No, it's fine. I can talk now. Just give me a minute, while I hand my wife a shirt." Phone doesn't ring. Why not? I'm sitting at my desk, waiting for Stephen Dixon to call. I drum my fingers. I want to chat about his 25th book. It's called Phone Rings. It's fair to say that Dixon, a critically acclaimed Baltimore author, has a writing style that is easily parodied.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alane Salierno Mason and By Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | May 16, 1999
"30: Pieces of a Novel," by Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt & Co. 672 pages. $30.What defines a writer's writer? Critical acclaim without by popular recognition? Prolific output that evades easy categorization? A great reputation as a teacher of writing? Something in the work? On each of these counts, Stephen Dixon, author of 20 short story collections and novels -- two of which, "Frog" (1991) and "Interstate" (1994) were finalists for the National Book Award -- seems to qualify.His new novel, "30: Pieces of a Novel," has had a subtitle only a writer could love, particularly a writer despairing of turning his or her own "pieces" into a whole.
NEWS
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1997
"Gould: A Novel in Two Novels," by Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt and Company 227 pages. $24.One hates to be pedantic, but I must point out that Mr. Dixon, a prolific and recognized author, has for some reason refused to use paragraphs in this book. Since a great deal of the book is dialogue, he must divide speech with "and she said, and he said" repeatedly, and, I must add, ad nauseam.I don't mean he uses few paragraphs. He uses virtually no paragraphs. Almost the entire 227 pages is one long screed in which not change of scene, change of time, change of speaker, nor anything you may have become used to, is separated by the convention of an indentation.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
Baltimore's literary reputation cranked up a notch or three yesterday as a poet and two novelists here were named asfinalists for the 1995 National Book Awards, which rank second only to the Pulitzers in prestige among American writing prizes.Baltimore authors captured two of the five nominations for fiction. Stephen Dixon received his second nomination in four years, this time for his novel "Interstate," an exploration of the traumas of parents whose children have been victims of violence.
NEWS
By ALLEN BARRA and ALLEN BARRA,Special to The Sun | May 7, 1995
"Interstate," by Stephen Dixon. New York: Henry Holt and Company. 374 pages. $25Shortly after you read this, you're probably going to hear that Stephen Dixon's remarkable new novel "Interstate" is "experimental" in form, and this will probably put you off, as it should, since an investment of $25 and several hours worth of serious reading time entitles you to something more than an experiment. You shouldn't be put off; "Interstate" is not experimental but a work that reads as if Mr. Dixon had used such radical techniques his entire literary (this is 17th book)
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
Phone Rings Stephen Dixon Melville House / 333 pages. We all dread that one truly terrible phone call, the one that heralds inestimable grief, the one we absolutely know cannot - must not - be true. Stephen Dixon, winner of the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Award, a two-time nominee for the National Book Award and a Baltimorean on the faculty at Johns Hopkins, begins Phone Rings, his 25th work of fiction, with just such a phone call: Manny Fine calls his Uncle Stu to inform him of the accidental death of Dan, Manny's father and Stu's brother.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 3, 1995
INTERSTATE. By Stephen Dixon. Henry Holt and Co. 374 pages. $25. OVER THE course of 16 works of fiction, Baltimore author Stephen Dixon has constructed a vision of contemporary life that's at once morbid, hysterical and frighteningly true. Mr. Dixon's quirky run-on sentence writing style has earned him the adoration of many of his former students at Johns Hopkins University (this reviewer among them), colleagues in academia and book critics.Yet, although Mr. Dixon has received his share of accolades from the high-brow literary world -- his last novel, the colossal "Frog," received nominations for both the National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award -- his work has only recently started to get the sort of attention that it deserves.
NEWS
By ALLEN BARRA and ALLEN BARRA,Special to The Sun | May 7, 1995
"Interstate," by Stephen Dixon. New York: Henry Holt and Company. 374 pages. $25Shortly after you read this, you're probably going to hear that Stephen Dixon's remarkable new novel "Interstate" is "experimental" in form, and this will probably put you off, as it should, since an investment of $25 and several hours worth of serious reading time entitles you to something more than an experiment. You shouldn't be put off; "Interstate" is not experimental but a work that reads as if Mr. Dixon had used such radical techniques his entire literary (this is 17th book)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.