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Stephanopoulos

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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | February 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- White House communications chief George Stephanopoulos is such a master of control that when he gets annoyed, he lowers his already faint voice to a near whisper. As he gets angrier and angrier, the voice gets gentler and gentler, and the listener must get closer and closer to hear him out.It is a sort of reverse bludgeoning, a psyche-out played pianissimo."It allows him to dominate in a very unusual way," says one of his friends.It is much like the way the White House spokesman, who has become one of the celebrities of the Clinton crowd with his boyish features and GQ look, is trying to command the message sent out by the new administration each day: with measured words and measured access and a supremely controlled hand.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
It used to be that change at a network anchor desk was huge news. Now, with all the fragmentation, not so much. Anchor changes like the ones announced at ABC News today are a real barometer of how far network news has sunk in prestige and power -- though the networks are still making money off the nightly newscasts as they crawl on bloody knees to the media boneyard. ABC News announced today that it is shuffling its anchor desk. Diane Sawyer, who helped make "World News" a more aggressive operation and led a ratings surge that overtook Brian Williams and his sinking NBC News ship, is leaving the anchor desk.
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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | December 6, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Will Hillary Clinton have a major role at the White House? You bet, says President-elect Bill Clinton's communications director, George Stephanopoulos."
NEWS
By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | March 17, 2009
On the Web: * Sen. John McCain and ABC News correspondent George Stephanopoulos will be "tweeting" today in an interview hosted on the Twitter Web site. ABC News says McCain and Stephanopoulos will come together online for a "Twitterview." It will be conducted at noon. The microblogging platform restricts each entry to 140 characters. The public will be able to read the real-time 15-minute exchange by signing up at the Twitter site to follow both Stephanopoulos and McCain. Meanwhile, Stephanopoulos is inviting everyone to "tweet" him proposed questions - with a 140-character limit.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- While it lasted, the relationship was white-hot. Passion, late-night phone calls, angry scenes. When it cooled, time to tell the world: President Clinton was a shameless, lying dog. After all, ratting on a president can net big bucks, TV interviews, maybe a bestseller.No, not Monica Lewinsky alone. Sure, 74 million people, even after they swore they wouldn't, watched her giggle-and-tears romp with Barbara Walters. Her syrupy "Monica's Story" is a publishing comet.Why shouldn't George Stephanopoulos cash in on this trash-the-Clintons casino?
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | March 24, 1999
IT'S BEGINNING to look as if George Stephanopoulos bailed out too soon. Not that he needed a grueling year of defending President Clinton from Monica Lewinsky revelations and impeachment. But at the end of that harrowing road, Mr. Clinton is moving back toward the strategy of deferring to congressional Democrats that Mr. Stephanopoulos always supported -- with disastrous results.Not that you'd get much sense of that from Mr. Stephanopoulos' alternately engaging and superficial memoir, "All Too Human."
NEWS
By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | March 17, 2009
On the Web: * Sen. John McCain and ABC News correspondent George Stephanopoulos will be "tweeting" today in an interview hosted on the Twitter Web site. ABC News says McCain and Stephanopoulos will come together online for a "Twitterview." It will be conducted at noon. The microblogging platform restricts each entry to 140 characters. The public will be able to read the real-time 15-minute exchange by signing up at the Twitter site to follow both Stephanopoulos and McCain. Meanwhile, Stephanopoulos is inviting everyone to "tweet" him proposed questions - with a 140-character limit.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Even though Bill Clinton said he would focus like a "laser beam" on the economy, the president-elect is making himself heard on foreign affairs and coordinating his remarks on sensitive matters with the Bush administration.Yesterday he spoke by telephone with a group of Latin American leaders. Last week he sent a supportive telegram to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin that echoed President Bush's own words. And today he may speak to Caribbean leaders."When you're about to become president, you have to pay attention to problems you face around the world," George Stephanopoulos, Mr. Clinton's communications director, said yesterday.
FEATURES
December 4, 1996
Stephanopoulos accepts teaching post at Columbia U.George Stephanopoulos, one of President Clinton's closest advisers, has decided to teach at Columbia University after leaving the White House early next year, an official said yesterday.Stephanopoulos, whose service to Clinton dates to the 1992 campaign, made it known before Clinton's re-election that he would not serve in a second term.Stephanopoulos, 35, started at the White House as communications director. He soon moved out of the spotlight to an office next to the Oval Office and continued as one of the president's most trusted aides.
TOPIC
By Richard Shenkman | June 20, 1999
PICTURE THIS. You and your family are huddled around a radio to hear the president of the United States speak about banking reform. Nobody smirks while he talks. Nobody dares to speak. The room is reverentially silent. This is an unheard-of scene today, and not just because no one huddles around radios anymore. It is unheard-of because we Americans no longer feel toward presidents the way we once did. They're not heroes anymore. When in 1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his celebrated Fireside Chat on banking reform, Americans held presidents in awe. They named their children after them, as Americans of 100 years before had done.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 14, 2002
George Stephanopoulos is smart, handsome, famous and popular - all desirable attributes in a budding star of the network news world. As Stephanopoulos makes his debut tomorrow as the new anchor of ABC's Sunday public affairs show This Week, however, there are two people who could stand in the way of his success. There's Tim Russert, the boisterous NBC News Washington bureau chief who is host of rival Meet the Press. Then there's George Stephanopoulos, the smart, handsome, famous and popular former aide to Bill Clinton.
TOPIC
By Richard Shenkman | June 20, 1999
PICTURE THIS. You and your family are huddled around a radio to hear the president of the United States speak about banking reform. Nobody smirks while he talks. Nobody dares to speak. The room is reverentially silent. This is an unheard-of scene today, and not just because no one huddles around radios anymore. It is unheard-of because we Americans no longer feel toward presidents the way we once did. They're not heroes anymore. When in 1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his celebrated Fireside Chat on banking reform, Americans held presidents in awe. They named their children after them, as Americans of 100 years before had done.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | March 24, 1999
IT'S BEGINNING to look as if George Stephanopoulos bailed out too soon. Not that he needed a grueling year of defending President Clinton from Monica Lewinsky revelations and impeachment. But at the end of that harrowing road, Mr. Clinton is moving back toward the strategy of deferring to congressional Democrats that Mr. Stephanopoulos always supported -- with disastrous results.Not that you'd get much sense of that from Mr. Stephanopoulos' alternately engaging and superficial memoir, "All Too Human."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and By David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | March 21, 1999
"All Too Human: A Political Education," by George Stephanopoulos. Little, Brown. 456 pages. $27.95.Former Clinton insider George Stephanopoulos has written a book that's very different from the buzz surrounding it.To hear such veterans of earlier administrations as Richard Goodwin, Carl Rowan, and Jack Valenti tell it, Stephanopoulos has betrayed his ex-boss for a reputed $2.7 million advance.But Bill Clinton has been so thoroughly sliced and diced that the most newsworthy "dish" Stephanopoulos serves up is about himself.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- While it lasted, the relationship was white-hot. Passion, late-night phone calls, angry scenes. When it cooled, time to tell the world: President Clinton was a shameless, lying dog. After all, ratting on a president can net big bucks, TV interviews, maybe a bestseller.No, not Monica Lewinsky alone. Sure, 74 million people, even after they swore they wouldn't, watched her giggle-and-tears romp with Barbara Walters. Her syrupy "Monica's Story" is a publishing comet.Why shouldn't George Stephanopoulos cash in on this trash-the-Clintons casino?
NEWS
By Bruce Gottlieb | September 25, 1998
SOME PEOPLE are looking for a way to punish President Clinton that's tougher than censure but not as tough as impeachment.On ABC's "This Week," former Clintonite George Stephanopoulos proposed a fine -- Mr. Clinton should reimburse the government for the cost of the Monica Lewinsky portion of independent counsel Kenneth Starr's investigation (the part for which his dissembling was responsible).Is this suggestion serious?Mr. Stephanopoulos certainly meant to be serious and subsequent newspaper articles treated his proposal respectfully.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 7, 1993
Rarely does a TV show get canceled at the height of its popularity. But that's what happened last week when the White House pulled the plug on its daily press briefings."
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman and Thomas L. Friedman,New York Times News Service The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Amid concern in the White House last Friday over charges that cronyism lay behind the dismissal of seven travel aides, Clinton advisers summoned a senior official in the FBI to a political strategy session and solicited a public statement from the agency backing their version of events.By calling on the Federal Bureau of Investigation to help save the administration from embarrassment, the White House appeared to be deviating from two decades of efforts to insulate the law enforcement agency from even the appearance of presidential manipulation.
FEATURES
December 4, 1996
Stephanopoulos accepts teaching post at Columbia U.George Stephanopoulos, one of President Clinton's closest advisers, has decided to teach at Columbia University after leaving the White House early next year, an official said yesterday.Stephanopoulos, whose service to Clinton dates to the 1992 campaign, made it known before Clinton's re-election that he would not serve in a second term.Stephanopoulos, 35, started at the White House as communications director. He soon moved out of the spotlight to an office next to the Oval Office and continued as one of the president's most trusted aides.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If you have both cable TV and too much tim on your hands, you might want to watch the Whitewater hearings that begin tomorrow.These are not the big hearings. These are not the hearings that will answer questions about just what Bill and Hillary did and when they did it.No, these hearings will answer a much simpler question:How dumb can you be and still be considered smart in Washington?A central part of these hearings will be an investigation into contacts between the White House and officials of the Treasury Department.
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