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By DAN BERGER | September 25, 1991
If it were not in the Maryland Constitution that Steny must be given a district both Democratic and white, legislators would have no trouble drawing sensible and honest congressional districts.
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NEWS
January 27, 2011
Political parody by way of fake Twitter account? That's so 2009. Now, instead of skewering pols with the likes of @FakeOmalley and @StephanieRawlingsFake, someone has found a way to use the real thing: @LeaderHoyer. During Wednesday's State of the Union address, Democratic Rep. Steny Hoyer of Southern Maryland seemed to issue some startling tweets. "This AZ thing is working out for us very well," read one tweet attributed to the House's No. 2 Dem and captured by blogger Steve Lunceford . "Look how Republicans fell for this bi-partisan seating crap.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 12, 2001
There are too many bomb scares. Cut it out. Somebody better tell George that freedom of information is good. It's the other side that won't have it. Nancy Pelosi beat Steny Hoyer for whip because she raised more money for House Democrats than he did. It's that simple. If some big loudmouth liberal went deaf, Rush Limbaugh would joke about it, which would not make it funny.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman | October 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Republicans and some Democrats assailed yesterday a new Democratic proposal that would roll back some of the expanded spy powers that Congress passed into law in August. "Despite a very real terror threat, the House Democrats' proposal handcuffs our terror fighters trying to protect American families at home and troops overseas," said Sen. Christopher S. Bond of Missouri, the senior Republican on the Senate intelligence panel. Rep. Rush D. Holt, a New Jersey Democrat, unveiled a competing proposal that would further curtail the new spy powers, arguing that "one of the things we despise about totalitarian governments is that they spy on their own people in the name of national security."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
State Del. John S. Morgan, a conservative Republican from Prince George's County, is officially kicking off his congressional campaign today with a daylong tour of Maryland's 5th District -- a bid for a seat the GOP believes it can capture next year.Mr. Morgan, 31, a physicist from Laurel, has made no secret of his intentions of running next year against Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a once-powerful Democratic member of the House who is viewed as vulnerable by the Republicans."Since I cannot outspend Steny Hoyer, I'm going to outwork him and have an organization that'll outwork him," Mr. Morgan said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Call him ambitious. Call him a workaholic. Whatever the case, John S. Morgan never seems to quit.A 30-year-old Republican state delegate, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory physicist and congressional science adviser, "he's so busy he doesn't have time to find a wife," said his mother, Louise Morgan, of Hagerstown.And now the second-term delegate from Laurel is considering a run for Congress in 1996 against entrenched Democratic incumbent Steny H. Hoyer, who represents Prince George's County's 5th District.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman | October 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Republicans and some Democrats assailed yesterday a new Democratic proposal that would roll back some of the expanded spy powers that Congress passed into law in August. "Despite a very real terror threat, the House Democrats' proposal handcuffs our terror fighters trying to protect American families at home and troops overseas," said Sen. Christopher S. Bond of Missouri, the senior Republican on the Senate intelligence panel. Rep. Rush D. Holt, a New Jersey Democrat, unveiled a competing proposal that would further curtail the new spy powers, arguing that "one of the things we despise about totalitarian governments is that they spy on their own people in the name of national security."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Although many pols and political junkies are still recovering from the election year that would not die, some Republicans are already back on the war drums, looking ahead to 1996.Del. John S. Morgan, the Republican rocket scientist from Howard County, is seriously eyeing a bid against Democrat Steny H. Hoyer for Maryland's 5th District congressional seat.In fact, encouraged by GOP loyalists, the baby-faced 31-year-old from Laurel is forming an exploratory committee to look at the political reality of trying to topple the eight-term congressman and assess the cost of making such a run."
NEWS
March 27, 1992
Maryland's delegation in the U.S. House of Representatives bTC voted 5-3 against a leadership move to override President Bush's veto of the Democrats' election-year tax bill. Such an unusual result may explain why the Democratic leadership was unable to round up even a simple majority against the White House veto.Only Democrats Steny Hoyer, Benjamin Cardin and Kweisi Mfume answered "yes" when the roll was called. The "no" votes came from Republicans Wayne Gilchrest and Helen Delich Bentley, which were to be expected; from Beverly Byron, who was defeated in the March 3 primary, and Thomas McMillen, who is running against Mr. Gilchrest in a newly drawn district.
NEWS
September 26, 1992
Are voters still angry enough at Congress to exchange one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill for a political neophyte? The race for Maryland's newly redrawn Fifth Congressional District promises to be a useful gauge for determining if hostility toward incumbents has abated since the House check-bouncing scandal, or if it continues to be a force.Ordinarily, Republican Larry Hogan Jr. wouldn't stand a chance against Rep. Steny Hoyer. But the reaction against incumbents has made Mr. Hoyer -- the fourth-highest ranking member of his party's leadership and the quintessential "slick" politician -- vulnerable.
NEWS
By Ronal Kobell and Ronal Kobell,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
When he entered politics at the age of 27, Steny Hoyer wanted to be the top man in Annapolis. He worked the halls of the State House, eventually winning election to the Senate president's office in 1975 and becoming the youngest person to serve in that position. Four years later, he became Acting Gov. Blair Lee III's running mate, hoping to eventually become governor. But the Lee-Hoyer ticket lost, and Hoyer found himself out of a job. Three years later, when Congresswoman Gladys Noon Spellman suffered a stroke and a special election was held to replace her, Hoyer decided to run for her seat.
NEWS
By David Schoetz and David Schoetz,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - When Steny H. Hoyer met Cory Alexander, the veteran Southern Maryland congressman had no idea that Alexander would be his chief of staff one day. In fact, according to Hoyer, the 8-year-old kid was a pain in the neck. But over the past 10 years, Alexander, now 32, has grown invaluable to the No. 2-ranking House Democrat. Moving through a range of positions before taking over the top staff job in 2001, Alexander is described as reliable, effective and intensely loyal. He also has a clear understanding of his duties: know Hoyer's goals and run the nearly 40-person office smoothly enough to achieve them.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 12, 2001
There are too many bomb scares. Cut it out. Somebody better tell George that freedom of information is good. It's the other side that won't have it. Nancy Pelosi beat Steny Hoyer for whip because she raised more money for House Democrats than he did. It's that simple. If some big loudmouth liberal went deaf, Rush Limbaugh would joke about it, which would not make it funny.
NEWS
October 1, 2000
THE SOUND OF prosperity -- an F-18 Hornet -- roared overhead, obliterating the words of the congressman seeking re-election. Nothing he said was more telling than the sound and sight of this war plane, a symbolic salute to his most important political achievements in Congress. Now seeking a 10th term in the U.S. House of Representatives, Steny H. Hoyer had come to inaugurate a post office in Lexington Park, home to Patuxent Naval Air Station, known as Pax River. The 5th District congressman helped get the bright blue-and-white building constructed -- after he saved Pax River, cementing it into the Navy's long-range plans.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
WHISPERS FROM the south have turned into a low roar over the 5th District congressional seat held by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, the eight-term Democrat from Prince George's County.It's starting to sound as if a GOP primary is likely March 5.Del. John S. Morgan, a second-term Republican legislator from Prince George's, already has announced his candidacy and has been working steadily for nearly a year to cultivate grass-roots support and line up party officials behind him.But Lawrence J. Hogan Jr., son of the former congressman and county executive, is weighing a bid of his own. And he is making sure that Republican Party activists, elected officials and past supporters know of his interest.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
REPUBLICAN DEL. John S. Morgan of Laurel has made it official: He will battle veteran Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer next year for Maryland's Fifth Congressional District seat. Mr. Hoyer, first elected to the office in 1981, overcame strong Republican challenges in 1990 and 1992. However, the conservative lay of the land in the newly redrawn Fifth District, the ascendancy of the right in American politics and Mr. Morgan's considerable assets probably mean Mr. Hoyer is in for his toughest fight yet.In the 1980s, when it mostly comprised Prince George's County, the Fifth was reliably Democratic.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
WHISPERS FROM the south have turned into a low roar over the 5th District congressional seat held by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, the eight-term Democrat from Prince George's County.It's starting to sound as if a GOP primary is likely March 5.Del. John S. Morgan, a second-term Republican legislator from Prince George's, already has announced his candidacy and has been working steadily for nearly a year to cultivate grass-roots support and line up party officials behind him.But Lawrence J. Hogan Jr., son of the former congressman and county executive, is weighing a bid of his own. And he is making sure that Republican Party activists, elected officials and past supporters know of his interest.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Think of it as a high school student government contest -- but one with infinitely higher stakes and, perhaps, nastier partisans.Maryland Representative Steny H. Hoyer is pitted against Michigan Representative David E. Bonior in a race to succeed Representative William H. Gray III of Pennsylvania as the new "whip" -- a powerful post that ranks third in the leadership hierarchy and puts its occupant in direct line of succession to the Speakership.The...
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
State Del. John S. Morgan, a conservative Republican from Prince George's County, is officially kicking off his congressional campaign today with a daylong tour of Maryland's 5th District -- a bid for a seat the GOP believes it can capture next year.Mr. Morgan, 31, a physicist from Laurel, has made no secret of his intentions of running next year against Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a once-powerful Democratic member of the House who is viewed as vulnerable by the Republicans."Since I cannot outspend Steny Hoyer, I'm going to outwork him and have an organization that'll outwork him," Mr. Morgan said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Call him ambitious. Call him a workaholic. Whatever the case, John S. Morgan never seems to quit.A 30-year-old Republican state delegate, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory physicist and congressional science adviser, "he's so busy he doesn't have time to find a wife," said his mother, Louise Morgan, of Hagerstown.And now the second-term delegate from Laurel is considering a run for Congress in 1996 against entrenched Democratic incumbent Steny H. Hoyer, who represents Prince George's County's 5th District.
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