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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Edward Gunther feels that he has lost more than a boss.In accepting the resignation of Robert C. Stempel as chairman and chief executive of General Motors Corp., the board of directors pulled the rug out from under perhaps the best person to turn the corporation around and steer it down the road to profitability, Mr. Gunther feels."Mr. Stempel was a different breed of man," said the 44-year-old worker at GM's minivan assembly plant on Broening Highway. "He wasn't a bean counter. He wasn't from the finance side of the company."
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2001
Sept. 6 Schooley & Stempel Inc., 224 E. Main St. Westminster, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Principal: James C. Stempel, president. Assets: under $50,000; liabilities: $40,368.66 Rosse & Associates, 9475 Deereco Road, Timonium, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Principal: Claire B. Rosse, vice president. Assets: over $100,000; liabilities: over $500,000 Abbreviations a.k.a.: also known as; c/o: care of; d/b/a: doing business as; t/a: trading as; n/a: not available; n/l: not listed; H/C: Holding Company; LLC: Limited Liability Company; L/P: Limited Partnership; J/V: Joint Venture; P/A: Professional Association; P/C: Professional Corporation
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NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 27, 1992
NEW YORK -- General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert C. Stempel, the hands-on engineer whose 1990 appointment was hailed as a shift toward long-term planning and quality, resigned yesterday after bowing to pressure from disgruntled board members.The move came just days after board members, said to be impatient with his methodical style as the company lost billions of dollars, took the unusual step of refusing to back Mr. Stempel after rumors surfaced that they were considering his ouster.But rather than help the ungainly auto giant return to profitability, industry analysts said, Mr. Stempel's resignation could create more problems and have little effect.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | November 16, 1992
In 1819, when Thomas Blanchard began making interchangeable gunstocks at the Springfield Arsenal in Massachusetts, the American industrial revolution was born. On Oct. 26, 1992, in Detroit, when General Motors' board forced out Chairman Bob Stempel, it died.In between, U.S. enterprise soared to unprecedented heights; then, in recent years, Japan, Germany and others caught up with us. Now, as the world economy changes dramatically, all bets are off; tomorrow's winners, individuals and companies and nations, are anybody's guess.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder | January 13, 1992
DETROIT -- As the smoke clears from President Bush's recent trade scuffle with the Japanese, it appears now that the battle is just beginning."We started a meaningful process in Japan, and we plan to follow up on it," General Motors Chairman Robert Stempel said yesterday before giving the keynote speech at the Automotive News World Congress, which began last night in Detroit."
BUSINESS
By Jim Fuquay and Jim Fuquay,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | March 8, 1992
He entered the chairman's office at General Motors at the start of a difficult decade, and by the second year of his tenure he had forged his die to recast the world's largest industrial company.The mold included plant closings and slashes in white-collar staffing, billions of dollars for modernization and vows to compete on a world scale. The blueprint was a bold corporate reorganization, an effort to dismantle empires and fiefdoms dating back to the days of Alfred P. Sloan, father of the modern GM.That was Roger Smith's vision of the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Linda Grant and Linda Grant,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 1992
NEW YORK -- Sources close to General Motors Corp. said yesterday that the board of directors' putsch against Robert C. Stempel's management, led by John G. Smale, retired chairman of Procter & Gamble, was strongly supported by directors Dennis Weatherstone, chairman of the New York bank J. P. Morgan & Co., and Thomas H. Wyman, former chairman of CBS Inc.J. Willard Marriott Jr., chairman of the Marriott Corp., played an active role last spring when the board first asserted control, sources said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 27, 1992
No matter who takes over at General Motors as Robert C.Stempel's replacement, or how good he is, the new chairman will locked into a corporate strategy even before he takes command -- a strategy dictated by the nation's weak economy.Simply stated, GM waited too long for ballooning sales to save the day. Sales are running at an annual rate of barely 13 million a year, far from the 15 million American car and truck sales that in the late 1980s had created enough demand to mask GM's numerous inefficiencies.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2001
Sept. 6 Schooley & Stempel Inc., 224 E. Main St. Westminster, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Principal: James C. Stempel, president. Assets: under $50,000; liabilities: $40,368.66 Rosse & Associates, 9475 Deereco Road, Timonium, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Principal: Claire B. Rosse, vice president. Assets: over $100,000; liabilities: over $500,000 Abbreviations a.k.a.: also known as; c/o: care of; d/b/a: doing business as; t/a: trading as; n/a: not available; n/l: not listed; H/C: Holding Company; LLC: Limited Liability Company; L/P: Limited Partnership; J/V: Joint Venture; P/A: Professional Association; P/C: Professional Corporation
BUSINESS
By Doron P. Levin and Doron P. Levin,New York Times News Service | April 7, 1992
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. abruptly demoted its No. 2 executive yesterday and reassigned several other top executives, a sign that the world's largest automaker faces continuing difficulty in reversing the steep losses of its troubled North American automotive operations.After a board meeting in Dallas, Lloyd E. Reuss was replaced as president, effective immediately, by John F. "Jack" Smith Jr.Mr. Smith, who had been a vice chairman in charge of GM's international operations since 1990, received the additional title of chief operating officer.
NEWS
October 29, 1992
The earthquake in the Detroit boardroom of General Motors is causing tremors at the GM plant on Broening Highway. With the ouster of chairman Robert C. Stempel, a boss popular with the rank-and-file, tough-minded outside directors are now in charge, their eyes firmly fixed on the bottom line.Not that the Baltimore operation seems to be in immediate danger; its mid-sized vans remain one of the more popular vehicles on the market. Last December, Broening escaped the first hit-list as Mr. Stempel launched a national campaign to close 21 plants and eliminate 74,000 jobs.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 28, 1992
If General Motors was run like Blue Cross of Maryland, CEO Stempel would have just got a raise.Rejecting their constitution is the first thing a majority of Canadians have agreed about in years.If Ross doesn't win the election, you will know it was dirty tricks; without dirty tricks he would surely win, right?Get ready for a whole new wave of updated, contemporary, pure '90s cliches to pepper our punditry. There's a new edition of Bartlett's out.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992
Text of statements released Monday by General Motors Corp. from resigning Chairman Robert C. Stempel and John G. Smale, who heads the GM board's executive committee:Robert C. Stempel"Today I informed the General Motors board of directors that I was resigning as chairman and chief executive officer, effective immediately, and that I would serve at the pleasure of the board until a successor could be named."I made this decision in the best interest of the corporation and its fine, dedicated employees at all levels of the organization.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Edward Gunther feels that he has lost more than a boss.In accepting the resignation of Robert C. Stempel as chairman and chief executive of General Motors Corp., the board of directors pulled the rug out from under perhaps the best person to turn the corporation around and steer it down the road to profitability, Mr. Gunther feels."Mr. Stempel was a different breed of man," said the 44-year-old worker at GM's minivan assembly plant on Broening Highway. "He wasn't a bean counter. He wasn't from the finance side of the company."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 27, 1992
No matter who takes over at General Motors as Robert C.Stempel's replacement, or how good he is, the new chairman will locked into a corporate strategy even before he takes command -- a strategy dictated by the nation's weak economy.Simply stated, GM waited too long for ballooning sales to save the day. Sales are running at an annual rate of barely 13 million a year, far from the 15 million American car and truck sales that in the late 1980s had created enough demand to mask GM's numerous inefficiencies.
BUSINESS
By Linda Grant and Linda Grant,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 1992
NEW YORK -- Sources close to General Motors Corp. said yesterday that the board of directors' putsch against Robert C. Stempel's management, led by John G. Smale, retired chairman of Procter & Gamble, was strongly supported by directors Dennis Weatherstone, chairman of the New York bank J. P. Morgan & Co., and Thomas H. Wyman, former chairman of CBS Inc.J. Willard Marriott Jr., chairman of the Marriott Corp., played an active role last spring when the board first asserted control, sources said.
BUSINESS
By John Lippert and Greg Gardner and John Lippert and Greg Gardner,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
DETROIT -- In a nationwide teleconference today, General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert Stempel is expected to open the next traumatic chapter in GM history -- including cost cutting to deal with a $3.5 billion loss for 1991 and plant closings that will spare Michigan's Willow Run assembly plant but could sacrifice a Texas factory.Mr. Stempel also may announce other plant closings and comment on efforts to trim thousands of white-collar jobs, said GM and United Auto Workers officials who asked not to be named.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 28, 1992
If General Motors was run like Blue Cross of Maryland, CEO Stempel would have just got a raise.Rejecting their constitution is the first thing a majority of Canadians have agreed about in years.If Ross doesn't win the election, you will know it was dirty tricks; without dirty tricks he would surely win, right?Get ready for a whole new wave of updated, contemporary, pure '90s cliches to pepper our punditry. There's a new edition of Bartlett's out.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 27, 1992
NEW YORK -- General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert C. Stempel, the hands-on engineer whose 1990 appointment was hailed as a shift toward long-term planning and quality, resigned yesterday after bowing to pressure from disgruntled board members.The move came just days after board members, said to be impatient with his methodical style as the company lost billions of dollars, took the unusual step of refusing to back Mr. Stempel after rumors surfaced that they were considering his ouster.But rather than help the ungainly auto giant return to profitability, industry analysts said, Mr. Stempel's resignation could create more problems and have little effect.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | October 24, 1992
DETROIT -- Scrambling to satisfy an impatient board of directors, General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it was eliminating two of the six bureaucracies responsible for designing and building its vehicles.In a statement put out under the names of its reputedly lame-duck chairman, Robert C. Stempel, and president, John F. Smith Jr., GM said the consolidation would help it reach its goal of slashing 20,000 white-collar jobs by the end of 1993.Although it comes after a week of indications that Mr. Stempel's job is in jeopardy, yesterday's action is part of a retrenchment begun in December that is intended to eliminate 74,000 jobs and close 21 factories.
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