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NEWS
November 22, 1991
The big news in musical circles these days concerns Steinway. The pre-eminent American piano maker has struck a deal with Kawai, which has begun producing a new piano using Japanese materials, manufacturing techniques and Japanese workmen but with this imprint: "Designed by Steinway & Sons."Kawai hopes to market the new hybrid piano, dubbed the Boston, in seven upright and grand styles against such Far Eastern assembly-line pianos as Yamaha and Young Chang, which have won great popularity in recent years through their flexible pricing.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2011
An otherwise harmonious Board of Public Works meeting hit a dissonant note Wednesday when Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot objected to a $553,264 purchase of 32 Steinway-designed pianos for a performing arts center scheduled to open next year at Bowie State University. Franchot was outvoted by his fellow board members, Gov. Martin O'Malley and state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, but not before sounding an alarm that taxpayers were being asked to pay for top-of-the-line pianos at a time of budget austerity.
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NEWS
July 4, 1995
For the third time this century the venerable firm of Steinway & Sons, maker of the world's most famous pianos, has changed hands. The transition inevitably marks a period of uncertainty for the revered marque at a time when the future of the American piano industry is clouded.For most of this century, Steinway was a family-owned business whose products were synonymous with artistic excellence and hand-crafted quality. The Steinway piano was not only a fine musical instrument but a sound investment whose value increased steadily over the years.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
Virginia Hogan is more interested in style than in fashion. "I love putting things together my own way. I don't want to look like somebody else," says the 59-year-old concert pianist. When we "Glimpsed" the Cockeysville resident at The Center Club, she equated her taste in designer clothes to the standards of her profession. "I don't spend money on things that don't have quality. I'm a Steinway artist. I only play on Steinway [pianos] because Steinway is the real thing. ... I'm not a snob.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 5, 1992
The piano that Nelson Freire will play on this week and next is a new Steinway that the Baltimore Symphony bought this past spring after a year-long search.For years the BSO had been leasing Hamburg-made Steinways at a cost of $8,000 a year. The orchestra owned its own pianos -- a New York Steinway and a Viennese Bosendorfer -- but almost all of the pianists who came here didn't like them and the orchestra couldn't afford the money, now about $70,000, to buy a new instrument. So it was caught in the position of losing money through leases because it couldn't afford to make a larger purchase.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2005
NEW YORK / / Like soldiers at attention, lined up for a drill master's inspection, five grand pianos -- each 9 feet long, weighing in at 990 pounds, with about 12,000 individual parts -- sat along the wall of the nondescript, low-ceilinged selection room at the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens. The inspector, acclaimed Russian-born pianist Yefim Bronfman, calmly approached the formation and, progressing from left to right, put each instrument to the test -- rapid scales up and down the length of the keyboard, punchy chords, gentle phrases.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1996
Usually there is only one Steinway in evidence at Meyerhoff Hall. But this weekend, the place is chockablock with more than 70 of the world's most prestigious pianos.The instruments, which carry price tags from $13,000 to $75,000, occupy not the stage but the concert hall's lobby and balcony levels as part of a classy flea market that will benefit the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.It's the allure of owning the best that has excited Cynthia and Gene Eubanks of Jacksonville and her parents, Connie and Len Gajewski, visiting from Knoxville, Tenn.
NEWS
September 20, 2008
HENRY Z. STEINWAY Last of family to head piano maker Henry Z. Steinway, the last Steinway to run the piano-making company his family started in 1853, died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 93. Henry Ziegler Steinway - named for an uncle, and not to be confused with a cousin, Henry Steinway Ziegler - was the great-grandson of Heinrich Engelhard Steinway, the illiterate German immigrant who founded Steinway & Sons. Henry Steinway was born Aug. 23, 1915, in his parents' apartment on Park Avenue, between East 52nd and 53rd streets.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2003
SAN ANTONIO - As little girls, Helen Hewitt and her sister Ginger often were charged with dusting the grand piano that sat in their living room. It was no easy task, considering the piano's hulking shape and detailed woodwork. These days, the sisters have considerably more appreciation for the instrument's intricate engravings and majestic legs carved from rosewood. Last month, the piano was named the winner of a nationwide search for the oldest, privately owned Steinway grand piano, held to celebrate Steinway's 150th anniversary.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
Virginia Hogan is more interested in style than in fashion. "I love putting things together my own way. I don't want to look like somebody else," says the 59-year-old concert pianist. When we "Glimpsed" the Cockeysville resident at The Center Club, she equated her taste in designer clothes to the standards of her profession. "I don't spend money on things that don't have quality. I'm a Steinway artist. I only play on Steinway [pianos] because Steinway is the real thing. ... I'm not a snob.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
As a child, Heather Patterson played the piano. She's always loved opera and classical music. But that was a long time ago, before she wound up in prison on drug charges. Yet those memories came back Friday as renowned classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein performed selections of Schubert and Bach for about 46 inmates of the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup. "Listening to you play brought me back to a good time in my life," Patterson, 32 and originally of Hagerstown, told Dinnerstein.
NEWS
September 20, 2008
HENRY Z. STEINWAY Last of family to head piano maker Henry Z. Steinway, the last Steinway to run the piano-making company his family started in 1853, died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 93. Henry Ziegler Steinway - named for an uncle, and not to be confused with a cousin, Henry Steinway Ziegler - was the great-grandson of Heinrich Engelhard Steinway, the illiterate German immigrant who founded Steinway & Sons. Henry Steinway was born Aug. 23, 1915, in his parents' apartment on Park Avenue, between East 52nd and 53rd streets.
FEATURES
By McClatchy/Tribune | October 9, 2006
It's easy to be the 5 Browns. All you need are discipline, good looks and piano lessons starting at age 3. Or at least that's what you might believe when talking with the five cheerful offspring of Keith and Lisa Brown. The five are the hottest act in classical music. They are serious, Juilliard-trained pianists ages 21 to 27 who don't shy from casual dress. They always take time during their concerts for questions from the audience. What separates the Browns from most cheesily hyped classical crossover acts is that they are all sophisticated musicians.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2005
NEW YORK / / Like soldiers at attention, lined up for a drill master's inspection, five grand pianos -- each 9 feet long, weighing in at 990 pounds, with about 12,000 individual parts -- sat along the wall of the nondescript, low-ceilinged selection room at the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens. The inspector, acclaimed Russian-born pianist Yefim Bronfman, calmly approached the formation and, progressing from left to right, put each instrument to the test -- rapid scales up and down the length of the keyboard, punchy chords, gentle phrases.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2003
SAN ANTONIO - As little girls, Helen Hewitt and her sister Ginger often were charged with dusting the grand piano that sat in their living room. It was no easy task, considering the piano's hulking shape and detailed woodwork. These days, the sisters have considerably more appreciation for the instrument's intricate engravings and majestic legs carved from rosewood. Last month, the piano was named the winner of a nationwide search for the oldest, privately owned Steinway grand piano, held to celebrate Steinway's 150th anniversary.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | July 23, 2000
What could be more groovy, man? The '60s, the decade that baby boomers invented and now can't remember, is back -- at least in a design sense, according to Twist magazine (demographic: 'N Sync, Freddie Prinze Jr.). Normally you wouldn't expect much design advice from a magazine that features life's most embarrassing moments, several pages of fashion's hottest summer sandals, and celebrities' high school yearbook pictures (let's see, was that a year ago, or only six months?). However, Twist magazine, which says it provides "down-to-earth coverage of important teen issues with a fun, 'get real' approach," has some cool decorating suggestions.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson | June 17, 1999
Linda Gilbert is back from piano heaven, the glow of that experience still in her voice.She played a fantastic Steinway piano, competed against other pianists chosen for the Van Cliburn Foundation's competition of outstanding amateurs, and sat in on a talk given by Cliburn, one of her heroes of the keyboard. His words brought her to tears."It was great," she says. "He quoted from Rachmaninoff, and what he said is that music is enough for a lifetime. Music, all by itself, is enough for a lifetime.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 16, 1994
Pianist Eun Joo Chung walked on stage at Tawes Theatre at the University of Maryland College Park. Four gleaming grand pianos greeted her. The young musician seated herself at the first, a Steinway made in Hamburg, Germany, played the opening phrases of a Mozart sonata and immediately stood up and moved to a Steinway made in New York.She played more of the Mozart, some Chopin and some of Samuel Barber's Sonata. Then she moved again -- this time to a Yamaha grand -- but only for a short time before moving to the fourth instrument, a Baldwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | June 5, 2000
A new high-tech piano could be the perfect toy for the musically challenged dot-com magnate with extra cash to burn. Lots of extra cash. The glitzy, chip-powered Yamaha Disklavier Pro 2000, on display recently in San Francisco, can literally play itself and run its own video of the pianist. It's so talented it can recreate an evening with the late George Gershwin, with the same flair and style of the master himself. The fully loaded musical instrument has enough power to make the common desktop PC jealous.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson | June 17, 1999
Linda Gilbert is back from piano heaven, the glow of that experience still in her voice.She played a fantastic Steinway piano, competed against other pianists chosen for the Van Cliburn Foundation's competition of outstanding amateurs, and sat in on a talk given by Cliburn, one of her heroes of the keyboard. His words brought her to tears."It was great," she says. "He quoted from Rachmaninoff, and what he said is that music is enough for a lifetime. Music, all by itself, is enough for a lifetime.
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