Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSteelworkers
IN THE NEWS

Steelworkers

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
The United Steelworkers called a request by RG Steel to pay 21 of its remaining employees $767,000 in bonuses and health-insurance stipends "an inappropriate, unfair and outrageous effort. " The complaint, sent to members of the union Friday, came a day after the former steelmaker asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., for approval of the plan. RG Steel owned several steel mills, including Sparrows Point in Baltimore County, before auctioning off its property this summer for pennies on the dollar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Arthur V. D'Orazio, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. worker and musician, died Sunday of a heart attack at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Alessandro D'Orazio, a garment worker, and Elizabeth Grue D'Orazio, a homemaker, Arthur Vincent D'Orazio was born in Baltimore and raised near North Avenue and Fayette Street. He was a 1938 graduate of the old Thomas A. Edison Vocational High School at Howard and Centre streets. During World War II, he served with the 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment and fought in the New Guinea and Corregidor campaigns.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
For years, Jeff Mikula collected United Way donations from his fellow steelworkers at Sparrows Point. On Thursday, he - and 500 former co-workers from the now-closed plant - stood in line to receive them. The Dundalk man, who worked as an ironman for nearly 39 years at the mill, said accepting boxes stuffed by volunteers with chicken roasters and fixings for Christmas dinner was hard for the steelworkers, who were once among the charity's most generous donors in Maryland. "You see the need; you see what people are going through, the heartache," said Mikula, 57. "Steelworkers are proud people.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
Joshua Polanowski was one of the first to go. He drove south in his 15-year-old GMC pickup truck, leaving behind freezing cold and a forever-closed steel mill for a balmy winter and a choice of manufacturing jobs. Forrest and Lacey Martin followed with their two daughters and pair of cats. Goodbye, Maryland. Hello, Texas. The demise of Sparrows Point and its 2,000 jobs last year has forced many life-changing decisions. For a small but growing number of workers, that change is an out-of-state address.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
The two sides negotiating a labor contract that could lead to the reopening of an idled Bethlehem Steel Corp. division seem ready to throw in the towel.On Monday, the United Steelworkers of America rejected a contract proposal by Ispat Mexicana S.A. de C.V., which created BRW-Ispat Inc. to buy the bar, rod and wire division from Bethlehem Steel."It is time that BRW-Ispat group stop toying with our members and deceiving the community," Steelworkers President Lynn R. Williams said in statement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 1996
Displaying some of the labor movement's newfound aggressiveness, the United Steelworkers of America hopes to turn today's Indianapolis 500 into something more than a car race.Through demonstrations, banners, a blimp and a new country music song, the 700,000-member union is seeking to transform the speedway into a soapbox from which to urge consumers to boycott Bridgestone/Firestone Inc., the tire company.This is all part of a multipronged campaign, including rallies at tire dealers, to increase pressure on Bridgestone, a Japanese-owned company that the steelworkers have been fighting since they began a failed 10-month strike against it in July 1994.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2001
The deadline for the creditors of bankrupt LTV Corp. and the United Steelworkers of America to renegotiate their contract passed yesterday with no resolution. Talks are continuing indefinitely. The discussions are being watched closely by union members in Baltimore because Bethlehem Steel Corp., which employs about 4,000 people at its Sparrows Point plant, says it will demand that the union grant to it whatever concessions are given to LTV. Bethlehem's current contract with the Steelworkers went into effect in August 1999 and goes through July 2004.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
In a nearly hidden warren of second-floor offices on Eastern Avenue, newly energized steelworkers are focusing big labor's money and manpower in this election on the unseating of Newt Gingrich as House speaker.With a fury once reserved for the robber barons, these men and women will try to topple Gingrich by defeating stalwarts like Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. of Maryland's 2nd District. The freshman Republican, the steelworkers say, is an unrepentant supporter of Gingrich and his anti-worker agenda.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - With the steel industry facing a financial crisis, prospects appear to be growing for taxpayers to absorb a share of the health care costs for laid-off or retired workers that the industry is struggling to pay. Senate Democrats have included a one-year $400 million contribution to such costs as part of their price for supporting expanded trade negotiating authority for President Bush. Their plan - championed by Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland and John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia, both Democrats - would provide 73 percent of the cost of buying health insurance for laid-off or retired steelworkers who lose their company-provided health coverage.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
The United Steelworkers of America, instrumental in the history of Baltimore and other industrial cities but shrunken by the rise of technology and global competition, announced yesterday a plan to fortify itself by merging with another union. The Steelworkers will join the Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical and Energy Workers International Union (PACE) to become what the two organizations describe as the dominant union in North America in metals and many other commodities. Symbolic of the merger, the new union will have a lengthy name - the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied-Industrial and Service Workers International Union.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
The Steelworkers union local at Sparrows Point has been taken over by its parent organization, a standard practice when a steel mill closes. United Steelworkers Local 9477 was put into "administratorship" in January, according to Jim Strong, the Baltimore-area director for the USW International. Strong has been appointed to oversee the local while it winds down operations. "They've begun the dissolution process, basically," said Chris MacLarion, vice president of the local at Sparrows Point before it was taken over.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
The United Steelworkers Local 9477 has dreamed up a number of fictitious reasons for the demise of the mill at Sparrows Point ("Union's account of steel mill's end," Dec. 18). They have refused to admit, and The Sun seems afraid to say, that the real reason there will no longer be a steel mill at Sparrows Point stems from the fact that no corporation in the U.S. can make money in that business because of high labor costs due to union demands. Why are our shoes no longer made in the United States?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
For years, Jeff Mikula collected United Way donations from his fellow steelworkers at Sparrows Point. On Thursday, he - and 500 former co-workers from the now-closed plant - stood in line to receive them. The Dundalk man, who worked as an ironman for nearly 39 years at the mill, said accepting boxes stuffed by volunteers with chicken roasters and fixings for Christmas dinner was hard for the steelworkers, who were once among the charity's most generous donors in Maryland. "You see the need; you see what people are going through, the heartache," said Mikula, 57. "Steelworkers are proud people.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Several hundred former Sparrows Point workers gathering late Monday afternoon for details of their steel mill's demise heard from union leaders that at least two groups had wanted to restart the plant but weren't given the chance. Joe Rosel, president of United Steelworkers Local 9477 in Sparrows Point, told the crowd that Sherman International, an iron and steel equipment supplier in Pittsburgh, wanted to operate the plant and tried to bid $150 million for it last week. "They were told they couldn't bid because the plant wasn't for sale anymore," Rosel said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A federal bankruptcy judge approved RG Steel's $767,000 "retention" plan for 21 employees Tuesday over the sharp objections of the United Steelworkers. The payments, approved by Judge Kevin J. Carey in Wilmington, include stipends for health insurance and a bonus equal to three months' salary, if the workers remain through Dec. 31. RG Steel — which owned the Sparrows Point mill in Baltimore County before auctioning it to a redevelopment firm and liquidator this summer — said the move was necessary to wind down its estate.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
The United Steelworkers called a request by RG Steel to pay 21 of its remaining employees $767,000 in bonuses and health-insurance stipends "an inappropriate, unfair and outrageous effort. " The complaint, sent to members of the union Friday, came a day after the former steelmaker asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., for approval of the plan. RG Steel owned several steel mills, including Sparrows Point in Baltimore County, before auctioning off its property this summer for pennies on the dollar.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
A bill introduced yesterday in the House of Representatives to provide health care under certain circumstances to retired steelworkers received a less than enthusiastic welcome from union officials and other steel allies. The legislation by Rep. Phil English, a Pennsylvania Republican, would provide health care benefits for the retirees of steel companies in the event that a firm was acquired by another domestic steelmaker, or if production capacity were reduced at the acquiring company's operations, or if a U.S. steelmaker closes.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Steelworkers, fearing they will lose their livelihoods as steel companies file for bankruptcy protection, will hold a rally this afternoon to support legislation in the House designed to protect the industry. The United Steelworkers of America, which is bringing in national President Leo Gerard for the event, hopes for a show of more than 1,000 this afternoon at the Sparrows Point union hall in Dundalk. They are rallying in support of the "Steel Revitalization Act." The legislation calls for tighter limits on imported steel, a $10 billion fund to provide loans to help companies upgrade their plants, and a 2 percent surcharge on all steel sold in the United States, with the proceeds going toward health insurance for retired Steelworkers and their spouses.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
More than 700 people turned out for workshops Tuesday connecting laid-off Sparrows Point workers with information about health insurance, training and other aid. An even larger number is expected at additional sessions scheduled for 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, both at the training center on the steel mill complex. Similar events in June drew much smaller crowds - employees were optimistic then that the idled Sparrows Point would be sold to a steelmaker and reopened.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Forrest Martin is looking at the same help-wanted listings as all the other Sparrows Point workers, the jobs with wages of $10 an hour, $13, $15. The jobs that could mean a pay cut of half — or more — from his steel mill days. But Martin, 31, isn't exactly in the same boat as everybody else. Half of the mill's workers started at Sparrows Point before he was born. Hundreds of its laid-off workers are eligible, if not able, to retire. Martin is part of a smaller group — about 280 of the 1,700 hourly employees — who are in their 20s or 30s and have most of their working lives ahead of them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.