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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 27, 1991
FARRELL, Pa. -- When Ann Wilson heard that her daughter's Army Reserve unit in Saudi Arabia might have been hit by an Iraqi Scud missile, she feared the worst."
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NEWS
By Warren Veith and Warren Veith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2002
WEIRTON, W.Va. - In a town that measures its survival one tin can at a time, President Bush and his plan to protect the steel industry are worth about a penny. A penny more for each of the billions of cans made from Weirton steel might be enough to keep blast-furnace electrician Phil DiMatteis from getting another layoff notice. It might keep customers coming to Dewey Guida's BBQ rib restaurant, where $18.95 buys a full rack with a side of potato skins smothered in cheese sauce. It might even help Weirton Steel Corp.
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SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
Qadry Ismail is a physical fitness freak. If there's a New Age therapy or contraption on the market, chances are he has tried it, but the Ravens wide receiver is a traditionalist on one front: He loved playing at Three Rivers Stadium. On Sunday, the Ravens will attempt to become the first visiting team to win at Heinz Field, the Steelers' new home. Their two-game win streak in Pittsburgh, normally an inhospitable stop for out-of-towners, is linked to some breakout games from Ismail. "Who knows what Heinz Field has to offer?"
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
Qadry Ismail is a physical fitness freak. If there's a New Age therapy or contraption on the market, chances are he has tried it, but the Ravens wide receiver is a traditionalist on one front: He loved playing at Three Rivers Stadium. On Sunday, the Ravens will attempt to become the first visiting team to win at Heinz Field, the Steelers' new home. Their two-game win streak in Pittsburgh, normally an inhospitable stop for out-of-towners, is linked to some breakout games from Ismail. "Who knows what Heinz Field has to offer?"
NEWS
By Mike Nortrup and Mike Nortrup,Contributing Sports Writer | July 29, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Two county men's softball league teams brought back many memories from last weekend, when they knocked heads with 32 other teams in the 1992 Amateur Softball Association Class D state championship tournament held at the county sports complex.James Contracting's players will recall the great catches, big hits and, particularly, a certain T-shirt that helped them win the tournament and make them this year's Class D ASA state champions.EVAPCO's warriors will recall somewhat fewer big plays and two nightmarish seventh innings that knocked them out of the tournament.
NEWS
By Linda Shopes | January 18, 1993
Because of an editing error, the Jan. 18 review of William Serrin's "Homestead: The Glory and Tragedy of an American Steel Town" misidentified Mr. Serrin. He is the son of a baker. Other Voices regrets the error.,HOMESTEAD: THE GLORY AND TRAGEDY OF AN AMERICAN STEEL TOWN. By William Serrin. Times Books/Random House. 452 pages. $25.What is steel?" John Dos Passos wrote in 1946. "Steel is America!" If that is true, then towns like Homestead, Pa. - and Buffalo, Youngstown, Gary and Sparrows Point - are quintessential American places.
FEATURES
By Larry Lipman and Larry Lipman,Cox News Service | January 2, 1994
Three rivers run through it, and from their waters you can gauge modern Pittsburgh.Once these rivers were the polluted receptacles of millions of tons of industrial waste. Their waters carried steel and coal around the world.Now the waters sparkle. Pleasure boats slice down one river and up the next. Elaborate, old-fashioned clippers carry sightseers and party groups.The story of Pittsburgh can be told in one small room -- the visitors center at the top of the Duquesne Incline.For flatlanders to appreciate an incline, you have to know a bit about Pittsburgh's geography.
NEWS
By Warren Veith and Warren Veith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2002
WEIRTON, W.Va. - In a town that measures its survival one tin can at a time, President Bush and his plan to protect the steel industry are worth about a penny. A penny more for each of the billions of cans made from Weirton steel might be enough to keep blast-furnace electrician Phil DiMatteis from getting another layoff notice. It might keep customers coming to Dewey Guida's BBQ rib restaurant, where $18.95 buys a full rack with a side of potato skins smothered in cheese sauce. It might even help Weirton Steel Corp.
NEWS
By The Literary Almanac | January 11, 1998
Toni Morrison (1931-) was born Chloe Anthony Wafford in an Ohio steel mill town, the daughter of of black share-croppers who had migrated from the South. She read voraciously as a child, and in 1949 attended Howard University, where she later taught English. She began writing, after the breakup of her marriage, which resulted in her first book, "The Bluest Eye," in 1970. She eventually moved herself and her two sons to New York, where she wrote fiction and became a senior editor at Random House.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 23, 2006
WHEELING, W.Va. -- President Bush publicly pressured the quarreling Iraqi political factions yesterday to put aside their differences and establish a government. "It's time for a government to get stood up," he said in the latest of a series of appearances bolstering his Iraq policy. "There's time for the elected representatives - or those who represent the voters, the political parties - to come together and form a unity government," Bush said. "That's what the people want. Otherwise, they wouldn't have gone to the polls, would they have?"
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
They tell me steel is made of iron, manganese and carbon They speak to me of "Open Hearth" and "Bessemer" and Gary All these they say Make steel - strong But I know steel is made from more than processes and alloy It's the sweat and blood of a million men from the puddlers to the call boys.- From Steel Is Strong, by Roy H. Westman The news earlier this week that Bethlehem Steel Corp., whose Sparrows Point mill was once the largest in the world, had filed for bankruptcy protection recalled a time when nearly 30,000 workers toiled away there making steel around the clock.
FEATURES
By Larry Lipman and Larry Lipman,Cox News Service | January 2, 1994
Three rivers run through it, and from their waters you can gauge modern Pittsburgh.Once these rivers were the polluted receptacles of millions of tons of industrial waste. Their waters carried steel and coal around the world.Now the waters sparkle. Pleasure boats slice down one river and up the next. Elaborate, old-fashioned clippers carry sightseers and party groups.The story of Pittsburgh can be told in one small room -- the visitors center at the top of the Duquesne Incline.For flatlanders to appreciate an incline, you have to know a bit about Pittsburgh's geography.
NEWS
By Mike Nortrup and Mike Nortrup,Contributing Sports Writer | July 29, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Two county men's softball league teams brought back many memories from last weekend, when they knocked heads with 32 other teams in the 1992 Amateur Softball Association Class D state championship tournament held at the county sports complex.James Contracting's players will recall the great catches, big hits and, particularly, a certain T-shirt that helped them win the tournament and make them this year's Class D ASA state champions.EVAPCO's warriors will recall somewhat fewer big plays and two nightmarish seventh innings that knocked them out of the tournament.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 27, 1991
FARRELL, Pa. -- When Ann Wilson heard that her daughter's Army Reserve unit in Saudi Arabia might have been hit by an Iraqi Scud missile, she feared the worst."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - A federal judge has delayed a decision on granting bail to six Buffalo-area men accused of receiving terrorist training at an al-Qaida camp, amid new evidence introduced this week by prosecutors. U.S. Magistrate H. Kenneth Schroeder, who had been expected to rule today on granting bail, postponed the decision until next week at the request of defense attorneys. He scheduled a hearing today in a Buffalo federal court to hear arguments on new allegations tying one of the defendants to a document about suicide bombings, written in Arabic.
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