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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | May 14, 2008
While beauty-shop camaraderie will appeal more to women than men in the audience of Prince George's Little Theatre's production of Steel Magnolias, the strong friendships and barbed wit that allow us to cope with hardship should have near-universal appeal. Robert Harling's comic play was first produced off-Broadway in 1987 with an all-female cast and ran for 1,126 performances. In 1989 Steel Magnolias became a movie starring Shirley MacLaine, Olympia Dukakis, Dolly Parton and Julia Roberts in a role that garnered her her first Oscar nomination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Paul Alvarez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 20, 2013
Some cravings will not be ignored. Deny yourself for too long, and the craving may become an obsession. The foods we crave are often regional specialties that are seemingly out of reach - a Philly cheese steak, barbecue pulled pork, red velvet cake or a big bowl of New England clam chowder. Luckily, you don't have to set the GPS and gas up the car to get what you want. We've found local chefs who are preparing these classics with authenticity - and willing to share their recipes, so you can have what makes you happy on your Baltimore food staycation.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | September 19, 1990
"We enjoy being nice to each other. There's not much else to do in this town," says Truvy, the amiable proprietor of the Louisiana beauty shop that serves as the backdrop for Robert Harling's play, "Steel Magnolias."Nice to each other? In truth, Truvy, her assistant Annelle and their four loyal customers of varying personalities and generations stretch the outer boundaries of "nice to each other" beyond recognition.These six strong, perceptive women collectively feed a reservoir of love and understanding that nurtures them when the vicissitudes of life come a' callin': widowhood, marital stress, family conflict, illness and, ultimately, death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
The Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre is in the midst of its 40th anniversary season, a significant milestone for a company that has tackled a sizable breadth of repertoire, from "Lysistrata" to "Hairspray," and maintained wallet-friendly ticket prices the whole time. This year, the troupe, based at the Community College of Baltimore County in Essex, has offered productions of "The King and I" and "Steel Magnolias," as well as a children's show, "Dr. Dolittle. " An eager, if uneven, production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Sunset Boulevard" opened last weekend on the main stage; "Laura," a play version of the hit 1940s film, opens Friday in the cabaret theater.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 19, 1996
Robert Harling's "Steel Magnolias" starts out like a comic country-western song and ends up a bona fide tear-jerker.Under F. Scott Black's direction, the cast in the Upstairs Cabaret at Cockpit in Court handles this shift in tone with finesse.The action takes place in Truvy Jones' small-town Louisiana beauty parlor on a series of Saturday mornings when the regulars gather for their weekly wash, set and gossip. But this temple to vanity turns out to be more of a balm for the soul than a cure for split ends.
NEWS
August 2, 2001
An interview with Ginny Van Brunt, co-founder of Steel Magnolias book club. What book are members reading this month? We're reading Tom Brokaw's book The Greatest Generation. The story is about World War II from the [point of view of the] soldiers who have come back. Does your group focus on a certain kind of book? We all personally like a certain kind of book, but as a group, no. ... One of the things that the members like is the fact that because we all get to choose a book ... a lot of times we read a book we never would have picked up ourselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996
The first Mainstage musical in Cockpit in Court's 1996 season is the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic "Oklahoma!", opening tomorrow. Directed by Tom Wyatt, the production stars Jennifer Viets and Jeff Burch as the couple who fear that "People Will Say We're in Love."Here's the rest of the season at Cockpit, the summer theater at Essex Community College, 7201 Rossville Blvd.: "Steel Magnolias" (Upstairs Cabaret, June 14-30); "Beauty and the Enchanted Beast" (Young People's Theatre in the Administration Building lecture hall, through July 21)
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1998
A MURAL depicting a Bedouin tribesman telling stories to children graces the wall of the study of Concetta and Eugene Pierelli, Normandy Heights residents for more than 30 years. Their son, Louis Pierelli, created the artwork on one of his trips home from Florence, Italy.He used techniques he learned in 21 years in Florence restoring frescoes, sculpture and other art objects.A 1974 graduate of Mount Hebron High School, Louis studied art history at the Johns Hopkins University and won a fellowship from Syracuse University to study in Florence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT and JESSICA BRANDT,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
The stars of the Vagabond Players' production of Steel Magnolias had to learn more than just their lines. Because the entire play takes place in a beauty shop, a number of the actresses had to learn how to style hair, too. In contrast to the popular 1989 film, the play is set entirely in a small-town Louisiana beauty shop -- a warm and open environment that provides its patrons an opportunity to let their hair down. Written by Robert Harling and based on the relationship between his mother and late sister, the play chronicles the story of six charming Southern women who support one another through a series of trials and triumphs.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | October 17, 1990
The Carroll Players is but one of many professional, educational and community theaters that patiently awaited the release of the production rights to Robert Harling's immensely popular "Steel Magnolias."When the film version finally made the money hoped for, theatrical rights were released and the poignant and humorous story found a home on stages coast to coast. There are or will be five productions of the play in this area, and it is the most-produced script of the season nationally.Selecting a recent popular film as part of a theatrical season is always a mixed blessing.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | May 14, 2008
While beauty-shop camaraderie will appeal more to women than men in the audience of Prince George's Little Theatre's production of Steel Magnolias, the strong friendships and barbed wit that allow us to cope with hardship should have near-universal appeal. Robert Harling's comic play was first produced off-Broadway in 1987 with an all-female cast and ran for 1,126 performances. In 1989 Steel Magnolias became a movie starring Shirley MacLaine, Olympia Dukakis, Dolly Parton and Julia Roberts in a role that garnered her her first Oscar nomination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT and JESSICA BRANDT,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
The stars of the Vagabond Players' production of Steel Magnolias had to learn more than just their lines. Because the entire play takes place in a beauty shop, a number of the actresses had to learn how to style hair, too. In contrast to the popular 1989 film, the play is set entirely in a small-town Louisiana beauty shop -- a warm and open environment that provides its patrons an opportunity to let their hair down. Written by Robert Harling and based on the relationship between his mother and late sister, the play chronicles the story of six charming Southern women who support one another through a series of trials and triumphs.
FEATURES
December 31, 2004
One dirty practical joke deserves - and begets - another in Johann Strauss Jr.'s 1874 opera Die Fledermaus (8:30 p.m.-11 p.m., WETA, Channel 26), recorded during a 2003 Washington performance. Washington Opera director Placido Domingo pops up in a cameo. At a glance WJZ 13 Special: Baltimore's New Year's Eve Spectacular (11 p.m.-12:30 a.m., WJZ, Channel 13) - The news team covers the fun and fireworks live. CBS. Bait (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) - Feds release a small-time crook, believing he'll lead them to stolen gold.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
McDaniel College to screen, discuss movie `Awara Soup' McDaniel College's Office of Multicultural Services will hold its monthly film series on "Exploring Our Connections: Documenting Our Lives" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Hall Room 108. Awara Soup will be shown with subtitles. The film focuses on a global village in the backcountry of French Guyana on the edge of South America. In Mana, 1,500 people speak 13 different languages and live together in harmony. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. A discussion of the film will be held after the viewing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linda Lee and By Linda Lee,NEW YORK TIMES | January 5, 2003
As if the economy and the sad state of his favorite sports team weren't enough, a man now has something new to cry about. The movie Antwone Fisher opened late last month, and all over the country men are honking into their handkerchiefs as the movie ends with a crawl saying, "In memory of my father ... " The film is a virtual fatherfest, with Denzel Washington (who also directed) playing a psychiatrist-father figure to the title character, a mixed-up (and fatherless) Navy seaman played by Derek Luke.
NEWS
August 2, 2001
An interview with Ginny Van Brunt, co-founder of Steel Magnolias book club. What book are members reading this month? We're reading Tom Brokaw's book The Greatest Generation. The story is about World War II from the [point of view of the] soldiers who have come back. Does your group focus on a certain kind of book? We all personally like a certain kind of book, but as a group, no. ... One of the things that the members like is the fact that because we all get to choose a book ... a lot of times we read a book we never would have picked up ourselves.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
McDaniel College to screen, discuss movie `Awara Soup' McDaniel College's Office of Multicultural Services will hold its monthly film series on "Exploring Our Connections: Documenting Our Lives" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Hall Room 108. Awara Soup will be shown with subtitles. The film focuses on a global village in the backcountry of French Guyana on the edge of South America. In Mana, 1,500 people speak 13 different languages and live together in harmony. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. A discussion of the film will be held after the viewing.
NEWS
June 14, 1996
Auto show, swap meet set Sunday in WestminsterAuto-Motion Promotions Inc. of Hampstead will sponsor its third annual Father's Day Jamboree Auto Show and Swap Meet on Sunday at Carroll County Agricultural Center, Smith Avenue, Westminster.Gates open at 7 a.m., with registration for the car show taken until 11: 30 a.m. Judging will begin at noon and prizes totaling $1,400 will be awarded.Last year's show drew more than 400 show cars from surrounding states and as far away as California. Sunday's show will be videotaped and the tapes available for purchase.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 1998
A MURAL depicting a Bedouin tribesman telling stories to children graces the wall of the study of Concetta and Eugene Pierelli, Normandy Heights residents for more than 30 years. Their son, Louis Pierelli, created the artwork on one of his trips home from Florence, Italy.He used techniques he learned in 21 years in Florence restoring frescoes, sculpture and other art objects.A 1974 graduate of Mount Hebron High School, Louis studied art history at the Johns Hopkins University and won a fellowship from Syracuse University to study in Florence.
NEWS
By Richard Horrmann and Richard Horrmann,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
"Do you know what it's like to never have had someone turn to you and say, 'I love you'?"Eight months after filming, these words, softly uttered by Aurora Greenway's housekeeper in the new film "The Evening Star," still bring tears to Marion Ross' eyes.As well they should. For not only do they signal a defining moment in this long-awaited sequel to "Terms of Endearment," they also are the words that landed Ross a role in the movie, the biggest part she's ever had in a feature film -- and they're the words that just might land her an Oscar.
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