Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSteel Industry
IN THE NEWS

Steel Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1995
The U.S. steel industry, hammered by imports in the past, now is turning the tables a bit with a dramatic increase in exports in recent months to European and Asian countries.One of the chief beneficiaries of the surge is Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point mill in Baltimore County, where exports have multiplied by 20 this year to 400,000 tons.But, even though Sparrows Point hopes to cement some of these new foreign relations, analysts warn that the export boom may fade as foreign economies hit their peak and decline.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Worthington Industries warned state officials Wednesday that it will close its 54-employee steel processing plant in Essex next year, a move that follows the collapse last year of the nearby Sparrows Point steel mill. "With the consolidation of the steel industry, many of the mills that previously supplied the Baltimore facility have closed, negatively impacting the supply chain there," Worthington said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing. "The Company has concluded that it can more efficiently service its customers in the Mid-Atlantic Region from other Worthington facilities and processing partners.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
Having achieved mixed results in its efforts to restrict steel imports through the regulatory process, the steel industry is now trying to change the trade laws themselves -- an action that is raising the hackles of steel importers.The object of the steel industry's attention is the legislation implementing the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) -- the multinational agreement aimed at lowering trade barriers. Steel importers and users charge that the steel industry is trying to include provisions in the bill that are contrary to its purpose.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
With all the screaming and scandal and nonsense over a possible casino at National Harbor, has no one asked how many casinos we need here in Maryland ("Baltimore casino names manager," Sept. 26)? Once upon a time this nation produced products that could be sold for profit and the generation of tax dollars. Today, while politicians allow the steel industry in Maryland and across America to die, they fall all over themselves building casinos that generate no products and rely on income earned in other lines of work.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Franklin and Stephen Franklin,Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1990
CHICAGO -- Given its disastrous showing in the 1980s, when it dropped billions and shed 60 percent of its workers, you might expect the U.S. steel industry to be swallowing tons of aspirin and boarding up its windows.But the recessionary alarms going off all around have yet to stir serious jitters in the steel industry, and analysts and industry officials say it is not a matter of bluffing or blindness.The steel industry of the 1990s is very different from that of the 1980s, when the United States sank into its last recession, they say. Furthermore, few expect the economy to take as deep a plunge.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2002
Steel industry supporters said yesterday that they will make another attempt to add an industry health-coverage provision to the trade bill making its way through Congress. Senate and White House negotiators agreed Thursday to abandon language in the trade bill that would have provided one year of health insurance to steel workers and retirees who had lost their coverage. Amid rising imports that helped lower prices, more than 30 U.S. steel companies have filed for bankruptcy protection since late 1997 and more than 125,000 retirees have lost their health coverage.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
The company that nearly purchased Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s shipyard two years ago is back, but this time it is not clear whether it's trying to buy or sell.WHX Corp. said Monday that it had purchased 1.6 percent of Bethlehem shares. Rather than signaling a takeover bid, analysts said, the purchase might mean the New York firm is trying to lure Bethlehem into making a bid of its own for WHX's steel subsidiary."What it might be is a different approach; attack Beth hoping they'll turn around and take you out. It's the Pac-Man defense," said Charles A. Bradford of Bradford Research in New York.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | September 18, 1991
While cleaning up the air around Baltimore and saving the company costly pollution fines, Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s decision to suspend operations at its Sparrows Point coke ovens could hurt the U.S. steel industry's competitiveness, industry experts said yesterday.Idling the coke ovens will delay or scuttle a couple of federally funded experiments that might have allowed similar facilities nationwide to operate with far lower pollution.And, industry officials say, closing the three Baltimore batteries (where coal is baked into a hard, pure form of carbon called coke)
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
The celebration yesterday of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s new $300 million cold mill at Sparrows Point was tempered a bit by the fact that imported steel is on the rise and driving down prices. Bethlehem spent more than $600 million renovating the Baltimore County plant, the largest piece of which was the cold mill. Had the steelmaker's board of directors declined to invest in the new mill, company officials said, it would have been the beginning of the end for the 113-year-old Sparrows Point facility.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
A U.S. trade agency ruled yesterday that stainless-steel round wire allegedly "dumped" on the U.S. market by makers in Japan, South Korea and four other countries has not injured U.S. manufacturers, a setback for an industry that has launched a counterattack on cheap imports.The case was filed by Cockeysville-based Handy & Harman Specialty Wire Group Inc. and nine other companies. Specialty Wire is a unit of Handy & Harman, based in New York."We are deeply disappointed in the negative finding of injury," said George Kurisky, a vice president at Handy & Harman who also is chairman of the U.S. Stainless Wire Action Committee, an industry coalition.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
They know massive layoffs loom, but Sparrows Point steelworkers who gathered at Micky's Bar after work Monday - the expected start of cuts - hadn't been told if or when they'd be out of a job. State and local officials trying to ramp up efforts to help them were similarly in the dark. Cash-strapped Sparrows Point owner RG Steel LLC wouldn't even confirm Monday whether its 1,975-job reduction had begun as planned, saying only that the cuts would be spread over the course of weeks. The company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy-law protection last week after warning state regulators that it would lay off most of its workforce.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
With the Sparrows Point steel mill preparing for a shutdown next week and a possible sale, Baltimore County officials began looking Wednesday for ways to redevelop the peninsula, bringing new jobs and businesses to the area around the ailing plant. In naming a task force to come up with ideas for the land, officials said they hope to capitalize on the expansion of the nearby port of Baltimore to lure new industry and revitalize communities that have been hit hard by unemployment.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
The struggling Sparrows Point steel mill could be sold within the next six months, mill owner RG Steel said Monday. "We're not going to be specific at this time," said Bette Kovach, an RG Steel spokeswoman, as she confirmed comments by two company executives that potential buyers were eyeing the Baltimore County plant, as well as others owned by the firm. Speaking last week to the Baltimore chapter of the Association of Women in the Metal Industries, Jerry Nelson, RG Steel's chief commercial officer, said that "people have expressed interest" in acquiring some RG Steel plants and that "I think it's safe to say everything is on the table.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
Three years ago, the purchase of the Sparrows Point steel mill by OAO Severstal was greeted with considerable cheer. After all, the one thing the Russian steelmaker could provide would surely be stable ownership after all the uncertainty of the ArcelorMittal takeover and the Bethlehem Steel bankruptcy. Of course, what wasn't so obvious in March 2008 was how far the U.S. and global economies would fall in the economic recession, and the hardship that would cause the steel industry.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | October 11, 2007
CHICAGO -- In a decision that will cheer domestic steel producers but disappoint U.S. manufacturers that buy steel to make their products, the U.S. International Trade Commission voted yesterday to extend anti-dumping duties on hot-rolled steel imported from China and five other countries. The fight over the import duties on hot-rolled steel is the latest flash point between the U.S. steel industry and domestic steel consumers. The domestic steel industry argues that U.S. steelmakers need protection, in the form of anti-dumping and countervailing duties, from low-cost steel imports from China and other countries that don't abide by U.S. trade rules.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 15, 2006
In a move that cheered automakers but angered domestic steel producers, the U.S. International Trade Commission yesterday eliminated most of its controversial tariffs on carbon-steel imports. The independent federal agency's ruling ends an unusual, high-profile feud between two American smokestack industries battered by global competition, Big Steel and its major customer, the auto industry. The commission's action will lower the price auto companies pay for steel and bring a similar benefit to other major steel buyers, such as implement makers Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Those same lower steel prices promise to pressure profits at many American steel producers.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2001
With the steel industry's perilous position underscored by Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s bankruptcy filing earlier this week, two local congressmen went to the Sparrows Point plant yesterday to assure management and union leaders that Congress is working on their behalf. Bethlehem was the 24th U.S. steel maker - and the largest - to file for bankruptcy protection since late 1998, and Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin and Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said several legislative and executive actions that are pending could bring some relief.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
Bethlehem Steel Corp. will cut more than 500 nonunion jobs from its nationwide work force this year, as the steelmaker struggles to recover from deflated prices and five straight money-losing quarters. About 100 workers will be cut from among the 650 salaried engineers, foremen and supervisors at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point Division in Baltimore, company officials said. The rest of the cuts will come from other Bethlehem locations. The company's salaried, nonunion work force includes about 4,500 people throughout the country.
NEWS
November 20, 2006
Foreign ownership of steel is big threat Jay Hancock's article "Another new owner might not be bad for the Point" (Nov.15) lays out a very clear picture of what's ahead for the American steel industry. Some bells should be going off in the heads of our politicians with the United States still at war and the biggest part of the American steel industry owned by non-American citizens. Mr. Hancock says that "for Sparrows Point, one more change might be better than the status quo." Yes - but I take that to mean American ownership of Sparrows Point steel mills.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,sun reporter | October 17, 2006
Executives from the nation's largest steel manufacturers, including Sparrows Point owner Mittal Steel Co. NV, will face off with automakers today over tariffs on foreign-made corrosion-resistant steel. DaimlerChrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Nissan and Toyota want the U.S. International Trade Commission to drop the duties on imports from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan and South Korea, a request fiercely resisted by steelmakers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.