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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | September 17, 1992
Foreign steel companies are showing interest in buying and perhaps operating Bethlehem Steel's closed rod mill at its Sparrows Point plant, according to a state economic development official.Scott M. Blacklin, director of the Maryland International Division, said representatives from three foreign companies have been meeting with Bethlehem and state officials since June about the possibility of buying the rod mill, which had employed about 350 workers. While he declined to name the companies, Mr. Blacklin said they include an Indonesian company, an Egyptian firm and a holding company based in Cyprus that represents Russian and Ukrainian steel operations.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Charles W. Thomas Jr., former owner of several steel fabrication companies and a Korean War veteran, died Saturday from renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Mays Chapel resident was 85. The son of Charles W. Thomas Sr., owner of Acme Steel Engineering Co., and Mary J. Thomas, a homemaker, Charles Wesley Thomas Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating in 1947 from the McDonogh School, Mr. Thomas followed his father into the steel fabrication business.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- When the Bethlehem Steel Corp. announced earlier this week that it would report a $64 million loss for the second quarter, it caused some nervousness among investors who had generally perceived the fortunes of the nation's second-largest steel producer, after USX, to be improving.After all, the company's losses had narrowed over the last year or so, and Bethlehem was laying off fewer workers and closing fewer plants.But the $64 million loss made it clear that Bethlehem's problems persist.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The owner of the financially ailing Sparrows Point steel plant is idling operations there, warning 1,975 workers Thursday that they would be laid off starting next month. The news, the latest casting doubt on the future of the Baltimore County facility, came as RG Steel is shopping the steel mill and its other assets to potential buyers. RG Steel informed the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulations that layoffs would begin June 4 and continue through June 18. The state said the company would be laying off 1,714 hourly and 261 salaried workers, losses that would be a significant blow to the economy.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Bethlehem Steel Corp., a grandfather of American industry whose vast Sparrows Point mill once placed Baltimore among the world's top steel-makers and shipbuilders, filed for bankruptcy protection yesterday. With $400 million in losses so far this year, the nation's third-largest steel manufacturer said it will cut jobs, renegotiate labor contracts and take "all possible steps" to reduce its expenses. The company will continue making steel as it reorganizes, and Chairman Robert S. Miller Jr. said the Sparrows Point plant will remain "a centerpiece" of its operations.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Now that Big Steel has foreign imports on the run with successful trade litigation, it doesn't want the government to mess it up by making a deal with other countries."
BUSINESS
By Jonathan P. Hicks and Jonathan P. Hicks,New York Times News Service | July 5, 1991
LTV Corp., the nation's third-largest steel producer, has told customers that it intends to raise prices on some products by about 5 percent, beginning Sept. 29.USX Corp., the nation's largest steel producer, and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Corp., the eighth-largest, said they would match the proposed increase.Other major steelmakers, including Bethlehem Steel Corp., InlandSteel and Armco Inc., said they were studying the price increases but that they had not yet decided whether to match them.Analysts, however, said the increases were unlikely to hold, given the current low demand from major customers and the inability of steelmakers over the last year to raise prices after several attempts.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Steelworkers, fearing they will lose their livelihoods as steel companies file for bankruptcy protection, will hold a rally this afternoon to support legislation in the House designed to protect the industry. The United Steelworkers of America, which is bringing in national President Leo Gerard for the event, hopes for a show of more than 1,000 this afternoon at the Sparrows Point union hall in Dundalk. They are rallying in support of the "Steel Revitalization Act." The legislation calls for tighter limits on imported steel, a $10 billion fund to provide loans to help companies upgrade their plants, and a 2 percent surcharge on all steel sold in the United States, with the proceeds going toward health insurance for retired Steelworkers and their spouses.
NEWS
December 16, 2001
CONSOLIDATION of big steel companies may be inevitable for their survival. It may also be in the national interest to encourage the merger of several money-losing companies, such as Bethlehem Steel, and promote greater efficiencies in this basic industry. But it is exceptionally bad policy for the federal government to assume the costs of the retiree health benefits of these firms to aid that consolidation. It would create a dangerous precedent and ongoing obligation for taxpayers while rewarding improvident decisions of bad management.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
Bethlehem Steel Corp. and other American steel companies received an early Christmas present yesterday as the U.S. Commerce Department slapped higher duties, ranging from 0.71 percent to 90.09 percent, on steel imports from 12 countriesThe ruling is expected to depress steel imports and to boost the prices of steel plate and sheet products, which are made at Bethlehem's Sparrows Point mill in Baltimore County.The amount of the conditional duties on various steel plate and sheet products varied depending on the company, country and the type of steel produced.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Daniel Heisler Sheppard Jr., co-founder of a Baltimore steel distribution and fabrication company and a noted collector of American antiques, died Saturday of a heart attack at his vacation home in Bethany Beach, Del. The longtime Ruxton resident was 85. Mr. Sheppard, the son of the owner of a dry cleaning establishment and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School, he enlisted in the Navy, where he was a signalman in the Pacific Theater aboard the battleship USS Indiana during World War II. After the war, Mr. Sheppard began his career as a steel salesman with United Steel of America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | November 25, 2009
George Alexander Kay III, a founder and partner in an Anne Arundel County steel distributorship, died Nov. 14 of lung cancer at his Severna Park home. He was 75. Mr. Kay was born in Baltimore and raised on Ferndale Avenue. He was a 1953 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in business and industrial management from the Johns Hopkins University in 1957. After serving as a lieutenant with the Army Corps of Engineers from 1957 to 1959, he began a 30-year career with Armco Steel Inc. of Middletown, Ohio, in the company's industrial engineering department in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
Who wants to be a bailout recipient? We do! say the steel companies. Not content with what is likely to be the biggest public works program in decades, Big Steel wants to ensure taxpayers buy bridge, road, school and electric-grid steel only or largely from U.S. producers. Every provision in Congress' forthcoming stimulus should contain "a buy America clause," Nucor CEO Daniel R. DiMicco told The New York Times. What a good idea. The Buy America Act of 1933, signed by Herbert Hoover as he exited his miserable presidency, fueled a global trade war that hurt American exports and made the Great Depression even greater.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Edward F. "Slim" Wojnowski, who had been a local duckpin bowling champion during the 1950s and 1960s and was an active member of the Polish-American community, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 89. Mr. Wojnowski was born in Baltimore, the son of Polish immigrants, and was raised in Fells Point and near Patterson Park. He was a 1937 graduate of City College and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 1941, he began working as a machinist apprentice at Rustless Iron and Steel Co. in East Baltimore, which later became Armco Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 11, 2008
David A. Morgan, a retired steel company executive and active church member, died Saturday from complications of an infection at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 86. Mr. Morgan was born in Elizabeth, N.J., and frequently moved until his family settled in Cleveland, where he graduated from Shaker Heights High School in 1939. He attended Ohio State University and the Cleveland Institute of Art. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1941 after the Pearl Harbor bombing and fought at the battles for Tarawa, Saipan and Okinawa, where he was wounded in action twice.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 5, 2007
For the better part of three decades, as Richard Offley grew from a boy to a man on the peninsula between the Patapsco and Back rivers, the Sparrows Point steel mill was at the center of community life. Back then, it was still owned by Bethlehem Steel Corp., as it had been since 1916, and many of its employees lived in its namesake company town. The mill put food on their tables, maintained their schools and churches and sponsored the softball teams. "`The Company,' we called it, whatever the Company wanted, that's pretty much what happened," said Offley, 62. "They owned the town, they owned the fire department, they owned the police department.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a confirmation of U.S. competitiveness in at least one sector of the economy, the nation's capital created an export in a single day that could reduce the trade deficit by $100 million or more over the next 12 months.It consists of legal and lobbying services to be contracted by the 21 foreign countries and 47 foreign steel companies that must defend themselves against the trade complaints filed here Tuesday by struggling U.S. steel producers.To avoid punitive customs duties of up to 165 percent on shipments to the United States, each company and each country has hired or plans to hire at least one Washington law firm.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
U.S. steelmakers will ask the government to slap punitive tariffs on imports of cold-rolled steel, a traditionally high-profit product used in such wares as appliances and cars, executives of Bethlehem Steel Corp. and other American companies say.At its Sparrows Point Division in Baltimore County, Bethlehem Steel is spending an estimated $300 million to replace its outdated mill for making cold-rolled steel.Bethlehem, USX-U.S. Steel Corp. and Steel Dynamics Inc. executives allege that some foreign steelmakers are "dumping" cold-rolled steel on the U.S. market -- selling it here for less than in their home market.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Lorraine Mirabella and Allison Connolly and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporters | August 3, 2007
As a fifth-grader, James P. Bouchard went on a tour of the Inland Steel mill with his father, an executive at the Chicago plant, and from then on knew what he wanted to do with his life. "My father was my hero and my idol," Bouchard, 45, said yesterday. "I did my first science report on the Inland Steel company." His brother, Craig T. Bouchard, 53, watched as their father, Robert C. Bouchard, became one of only three Inland employees to rise from mailroom clerk to executive. His father was quoted in a 1963 trade magazine as saying the key to success is being "out to win" every time - even when he played his sons at chess, checkers or pingpong.
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