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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
In an article yesterday on the steamboat Columbus, the builder of the ship's engine was misidentified. His name is Charles Reeder.The Sun regrets the error.Archaeologists say they have found a missing link in the evolution of American steamship technology -- the massive iron-and-copper engine from the side-wheeler Columbus, which caught fire and sank in the Chesapeake Bay almost 142 years ago.The charred timbers of the 220-foot shipwreck cradle what may be the only surviving specimen of a crosshead engine, said Paul Hundley, underwater archaeologist with the Maryland Historical Trust.
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NEWS
April 21, 2014
Now should be the time for the Port of Baltimore to show the world that it's open for business. Work resumed in February on the expansion of the Panama Canal, which is now expected to be completed in 2015. When that happens, super-sized cargo ships will be able to traverse that century-old connection between the Atlantic and Pacific, and as it stands, only two East Coast ports will be able to handle them: Norfolk and Baltimore. But a lingering labor dispute between the steamship lines and one of the port's unions that led to a three-day strike last fall is giving the Port of Baltimore a black eye at precisely the wrong time.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
WHEN IT OPENED 88 years ago, Baltimore's Hansa Haus contained the walk-in brokerage for a German steamship company, where people could book cruises or arrange to transport cargo. After subsequent conversions to a museum branch, a catalog showroom and a cafe, the Redwood Street landmark will come full cycle in its use on Oct. 16. That's when it officially reopens as the new home of Allfirst Brokerage Corp., a subsidiary of Allfirst Bank that sells stocks, bonds, options, mutual funds and annuities to the public.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Albert C. Haeger, a veteran customhouse broker and freight forwarder who owned and operated the old William H. Masson Inc. brokerage, died Aug. 3 of pancreatic cancer at his Bel Air home. He was 85. The son of a merchant marine engineer and a homemaker, Albert Charles Haeger was born and raised on Staten Island, N.Y., where he graduated in 1945 from St. Peter's High School. When he was 18 and fresh out of high school, Mr. Haeger began answering newspaper ads for jobs at custom brokerage firms and received only one reply.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Maurice C. Byan, president of the Steamship Trade Association, was named port leader of the year yesterday by the Baltimore Junior Association of Commerce at its 26th annual luncheon honoring a maritime leader.Mr. Byan has headed the association, which represents 36 port employers, including major stevedore and steamship companies, since 1990. He has helped negotiate labor agreements with the International Longshoremen's Association, and has been instrumental in establishing training and quality-improvement programs with the union.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
What's the good news from the Port of Baltimore? It is still open for business. What's the bad news? Almost too horrible to contemplate.That about sums up the bleak outlook on the docks. December's two-day strike by union boss Richard P. Hughes and his clerks local has had a devastating impact that could be felt for years to come. The result already is less cargo - and thus fewer longshoremen's jobs - at the port.Baltimore's poor labor image was the "overriding factor" in the decision of Tricontinental Service to take its business to Norfolk.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Leaders of Baltimore's Longshoremen's union have rejected an offer by the Steamship Trade Association for an $18 million buyout of the program that pays Longshoremen when they are not working.The Baltimore District Council of the International Longshoremen's Association voted unanimously late last week to reject the offer to pay each member of the 1,800-member association $10,000 in exchange for eliminating the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI) fund by March 1994."We didn't think it was sufficient," said Richard P. Hughes Jr., head of Local 953, which represents the 400 checkers and clerks who handle the port's paperwork.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
Samuel A. Clauss, a former merchant mariner and port safety director, died in his sleep Sunday at an assisted-living facility in Hammonton, N.J. He was 88, and formerly a longtime Towson resident. Mr. Clauss was born and raised in Hammonton, and after graduating from high school joined the Civilian Conservation Corps. He went to sea in the late 1930s when he became a merchant mariner as an engine room oiler. In 1942, he went to work for Norgulf Steamship Co., serving aboard its fleet of oil tankers as chief engineer.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | May 15, 1991
Polish Ocean Lines, one of the most important steamship lines in the port of Baltimore, has no plans to shift vessels to Hampton Roads, Va., now that the line has received permission to call there.Until last week, 12 militarily sensitive ports in the United States, including Hampton Roads, were off limits to vessels from Eastern bloc nations. On May 8, President Bush lifted that prohibition on ships from Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Romania.Krzysztof Tyc, the senior representative for POL in North America, said yesterday that while he welcomed the decision, he did not expect the line to shift ships from Baltimore to Hampton Roads.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
In yet another effort to make the port of Baltimore more competitive, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday it will not increase rates for steamship lines next year, despite moves by other East Coast ports to do so.The unexpected decision to hold the line on tariffs came just days after Baltimore dockworkers ratified a five-year contract that employers said was critical to retaining business at the struggling port and for attracting new cargo."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Bruce Page Wilson, former president of Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co., who earlier had been president of the old Baltimore & Annapolis Railroad, died July 5 of complications from a stroke at Nubbin Ridge, his Green Spring Valley home, where he had lived for more than half a century. He was 92. "Bruce Wilson was a very strong and ethical person. He had it all," said H. Grant Hathaway, former chairman and chief executive officer of the old Equitable Trust Bank. "He was ... a terrific competitor.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 30, 2007
The final Saturday in June was the day we dreamt about all year. For a family with deep Baltimore roots, all we wanted to do was beat it out of town in advance of the July heat wave. The backyard garden walk and the alley behind my family's Guilford Avenue house were the beginning of our evacuation route. And it seemed as if the whole neighborhood was out to observe on the day the women and children were sent away to the beach.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
Samuel A. Clauss, a former merchant mariner and port safety director, died in his sleep Sunday at an assisted-living facility in Hammonton, N.J. He was 88, and formerly a longtime Towson resident. Mr. Clauss was born and raised in Hammonton, and after graduating from high school joined the Civilian Conservation Corps. He went to sea in the late 1930s when he became a merchant mariner as an engine room oiler. In 1942, he went to work for Norgulf Steamship Co., serving aboard its fleet of oil tankers as chief engineer.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
William Augustine McAuliffe Jr., a former shipping executive who later operated a cab company on the Eastern Shore, died of cancer Wednesday at Chester River Hospital Center. The Chestertown resident was 90. Mr. McAuliffe was born and raised in New York City. In 1938, he graduated from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. Before World War II, he worked for Lloyd's of London and R&K Steamship Lines. He enlisted in the Navy on Dec. 7, 1941, the day Pearl Harbor was attacked, and served throughout the war, attaining the rank of lieutenant commander.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2004
Capt. Steven M. Moodie, a World War II Liberty shipmaster who later became president of the Baltimore-based Calmar Steamship Corp., died of lung cancer March 6 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 82. With his closely cut silver hair and ruddy complexion, Captain Moodie seemed to be the embodiment of an experienced old salt. He was born in Dundee, Scotland, into a seafaring family. His father was a steamship captain, and an uncle had been master of the famed British clipper ship Cutty Sark, which was built in 1869.
NEWS
February 2, 2001
WHAT A VICTORY for Baltimore. No, not the football championship. We're talking about Baltimore's massive deal with the world's leading roll-on/ roll-off shipping company. It's a maritime comeback of Super Bowl proportions, one that makes Baltimore the dominant force among East Coast ports when it comes to "ro/ro" vehicles -- cars, trucks and farm equipment. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the giant Scandinavian steamship line, now will make Baltimore its largest North American "load center." More than 600,000 tons of cargo per year are expected to pass through its hub at Dundalk Marine Terminal, enough to create 1,000 more jobs on the waterfront.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
The Port of Baltimore enters the year hoping to continue its steady growth in cargo by capitalizing on last year's agreements liberalizing world trade.Both the North American Free Trade Agreement and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade accord are expected to increase trade in Baltimore and elsewhere by significantly reducing or eliminating tariffs."We're anticipating a positive impact at the port of Baltimore," said Michael P. Angelos, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, which oversees the state's five public marine terminals.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
The Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore is close to finalizing an $18 million loan agreement that would allow the port employers' group to finance a buyout of an expensive program that pays Longshoremen when they are not working.Sources at the port say a lump sum of about $10,000 would be offered to each member of the 1,800-member Longshoremen's association under the buyout. If accepted, the plan could cut labor costs at the port by $12 million a year by 1996.But the Longshoremen are fiercely protective of the Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
WHEN IT OPENED 88 years ago, Baltimore's Hansa Haus contained the walk-in brokerage for a German steamship company, where people could book cruises or arrange to transport cargo. After subsequent conversions to a museum branch, a catalog showroom and a cafe, the Redwood Street landmark will come full cycle in its use on Oct. 16. That's when it officially reopens as the new home of Allfirst Brokerage Corp., a subsidiary of Allfirst Bank that sells stocks, bonds, options, mutual funds and annuities to the public.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Lawmakers are usually in the business of getting money for their constituency. The more the better. So when Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest of Maryland took to the House floor recently and offered to give back millions already earmarked for two dredging projects in his home state, colleagues were stunned. "When you even talk about deauthorizing [a project], it is the buzz of the Capitol," said Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Baltimore Democrat who helped lead a successful effort to defeat Gilchrest's proposed amendment.
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