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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
As a youngster in the 1920s, H. Graham Wood of Roland Park spent countless hours sailing the Chesapeake Bay in graceful steamboats with his father, a lumber merchant.His boyhood fascination with the imposing vessels led to a lifelong interest, including co-writing a book, "Steamboats Out of Baltimore," in 1968.Mr. Wood, a retired senior vice president with First National Bank of Maryland, died Friday of complications from a stroke at his home in Roland Park, an area where he lived most of his life.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 31, 2011
Discovered and submitted for your pleasure: A curious tale from the historically seismic year of 1861 — you might say "Pirates of the Caribbean" transported to the Civil War and the Chesapeake Bay. If the Coen brothers turn down the opportunity to turn this into a movie starring Johnny Depp, someone else should grab it. This is a story for the big screen: a 150-year-old true yarn about a flamboyant lad from Southern Maryland who dressed like a...
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FEATURES
By Kara Kenna | May 8, 1994
Saddle up for a Wales rideA new trail-riding trip through the North Wales countryside has been added to the horseback vacations offered by Cross Country International Equestrian Vacations. Ideal for beginner, intermediate and advanced riders, the trail covers about 120 miles across the Lleyn peninsula, one of the most remote regions Wales.Riding groups are limited to a maximum of six riders, plus a leader. The cost for the six-day/seven-night trip, which follows // the Pilgrim Trail westerly, is $1,425; a three-day/four-night trip that travels east along the Snowdonia Trail costs $950.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 2, 2003
A Memorable Place Rediscovering America, on a steamboat By Robert Lidston SPECIAL TO THE SUN During the 1970s, people said I looked like a young Mark Twain. My hair and mustache were reddish-brown and bushy. Since then, my hair has become mostly white. Last year, I booked a steamboat trip from New Orleans to Memphis on the 80-year-old Delta Queen, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. I let my hair and mustache grow for a few months, packed a black bow tie and off-white summer suit, and bought a big, cheap cigar.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK TIDEWATER BY STEAMBOAT: A SAGA OF THE CHESAPEAKE. David C. Holly. Johns Hopkins University. 314 pages. $29.95. and J. WYNN ROUSUCK TIDEWATER BY STEAMBOAT: A SAGA OF THE CHESAPEAKE. David C. Holly. Johns Hopkins University. 314 pages. $29.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 1991
MONDO CANINE.Compiled and editedby Jon Winokur.Dutton.265 pages. $18.95. As proof that even professional curmudgeons love dogs, Jon Winokur -- editor of "The Portable Curmudgeon" and "A Curmudgeon's Garden of Love" -- has created "Mondo Canine."Like his previous efforts, this volume consists primarily of quotations, articles and stories. True to his record, he includes most of the best and brightest sources, from cana experta Barbara Woodhouse to such literary lights as James Thurber and E. B. White.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 31, 2011
Discovered and submitted for your pleasure: A curious tale from the historically seismic year of 1861 — you might say "Pirates of the Caribbean" transported to the Civil War and the Chesapeake Bay. If the Coen brothers turn down the opportunity to turn this into a movie starring Johnny Depp, someone else should grab it. This is a story for the big screen: a 150-year-old true yarn about a flamboyant lad from Southern Maryland who dressed like a...
FEATURES
By Alfred Borcover and Alfred Borcover,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1992
It's time for skiers to get serious. Makes no difference that autumn leaves, footballs and golf balls are still flying through the air, but nary a snowflake so far.Nevertheless, winter athletes should gear up for their season to streak down mountainsides, leaving plumes of powder snow in their wake. Or work out to glide with ease over cross-country ski trails through the woods.Winter images give many of us a chill. Thoughts of prolonged cold weather, naked trees and frigid winds can depress.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 2, 2003
A Memorable Place Rediscovering America, on a steamboat By Robert Lidston SPECIAL TO THE SUN During the 1970s, people said I looked like a young Mark Twain. My hair and mustache were reddish-brown and bushy. Since then, my hair has become mostly white. Last year, I booked a steamboat trip from New Orleans to Memphis on the 80-year-old Delta Queen, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. I let my hair and mustache grow for a few months, packed a black bow tie and off-white summer suit, and bought a big, cheap cigar.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | December 28, 1997
IT'S ONLY IN THE PERIOD after Dec. 25 that I can unwind. I enjoy these short days and long nights when the house is clean and cozy and the doorbell doesn't stop ringing.Friends and neighbors show up on my porch because they know that by now the Christmas garden is ready for lookers. After all, it takes a goodly chunk of the fall to make all those little toy trains and streetcars run on schedule. And there are plenty of street lamps to burn out. And what was a green pastoral scene of farm and field last year is in the winter of 1997 an icy white ski slope.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 26, 1991
On an August night during the 1930s, H. Graham Wood liked nothing better than to borrow his father's Buick, drive to Federal Hill and watch the maritime show unfolding in the harbor.It was better than fireworks. One by one, the Chesapeake Bay excursion steamboats glided up the Patapsco to berths on Light Street. His park bench seat gave him a view of the old Emma Giles, Express, Annapolis and Cambridge. Each blasted a throaty steam whistle.As night fell, the generators outlined their white wood sides with electric light bulbs.
TRAVEL
By Kennerly Clay and Kennerly Clay,Special to the Sun | September 7, 2003
A two-lane stretch of road crawls toward the village of Whitehaven, between cornfields and head-high marsh grasses, past farm and chicken houses that teeter on a fading way of life. A bare breeze carries a distinctly Eastern Shore hint of salty sea, river marsh and soil -- rooting me to this region I still consider home. I grew up just down the road in Quantico, a town of about 100 people with roughly twice the population of Whitehaven, which is a short drive from Salisbury, a metropolis by comparison.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2001
As they have in two earlier books, Hampden residents Bert and Anthea Smith are again taking readers on a Technicolor postcard perambulation to the resorts that once spanned the Chesapeake Bay from the Susquehanna Flats to Cape Henry, Va. A Day on the Bay, recently published by Johns Hopkins University Press, recalls a time when crowds carrying picnic hampers and portmanteaus jammed aboard white-painted, paddle-wheeled excursion steamboats with names like...
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
"Steamboat Vacations: Excursions on the Chesapeake," an exhibition that recently opened at the Maryland Historical Society recalls an era when Baltimoreans took to the water aboard bay steamers to escape the searing heat and humidity of the city.Carrying picnic hampers laden with fried chicken, deviled eggs, cakes and jugs of lemonade, crowds dressed in white flannels, summer frocks and wearing straw hats happily piled off streetcars holding the hands of anxious children as they made their way to the Pratt and Light street piers to board waiting steamers.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
The death of David C. Holly, 83, last month in Annapolis, was the second within a year of a prominent Chesapeake Bay steamboat historian.Last May, H. Graham Wood, 87, co-author of "Steamboats Out of Baltimore," published by Tidewater in 1968, died at his Roland Park home.Written with Robert H. Burgess, the book has become one of the standard works for anyone interested in the era when white packet boats, with their single straight black funnels belching the aroma of soft coal smoke, plied the bay, stitching together via a waterborne highway the entire Delmarva region.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 17, 1999
Since childhood, David C. Holly had been in love with steamboats, moved by their glamour and romance, mesmerized by the memories of seeing these huge vessels line the harbors of Baltimore, and spellbound by the stories he was told as a child.Mr. Holly turned his love for steamboats, in particular, and ships, in general, into a career, including 20 years of military service in the Navy, years of teaching at colleges and universities on the East Coast and writing four books.Mr. Holly died Friday at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis after a short illness.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
As a youngster in the 1920s, H. Graham Wood of Roland Park spent countless hours sailing the Chesapeake Bay in graceful steamboats with his father, a lumber merchant.His boyhood fascination with the imposing vessels led to a lifelong interest, including co-writing a book, "Steamboats Out of Baltimore," in 1968.Mr. Wood, a retired senior vice president with First National Bank of Maryland, died Friday of complications from a stroke at his home in Roland Park, an area where he lived most of his life.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
"Steamboat Vacations: Excursions on the Chesapeake," an exhibition that recently opened at the Maryland Historical Society recalls an era when Baltimoreans took to the water aboard bay steamers to escape the searing heat and humidity of the city.Carrying picnic hampers laden with fried chicken, deviled eggs, cakes and jugs of lemonade, crowds dressed in white flannels, summer frocks and wearing straw hats happily piled off streetcars holding the hands of anxious children as they made their way to the Pratt and Light street piers to board waiting steamers.
NEWS
By Rosemary Armao and Rosemary Armao,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Let me start with the garnish to make a point about The New Steamboat Landing Restaurant in Galesville. Food is served at this exquisite West River eatery on flat, bone-white plates ringed with a showy confetti of grated red cabbage, carrots and celery.Down to the smallest details, the new owners of this long-established restaurant have thought through what makes for unique dining."You have to go in and look at the bathroom," says Letitia Policano Gordon, who took over Steamboat Landing last year with her sister, Camille Policano, and their father, Larry Policano.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | December 28, 1997
IT'S ONLY IN THE PERIOD after Dec. 25 that I can unwind. I enjoy these short days and long nights when the house is clean and cozy and the doorbell doesn't stop ringing.Friends and neighbors show up on my porch because they know that by now the Christmas garden is ready for lookers. After all, it takes a goodly chunk of the fall to make all those little toy trains and streetcars run on schedule. And there are plenty of street lamps to burn out. And what was a green pastoral scene of farm and field last year is in the winter of 1997 an icy white ski slope.
NEWS
By Rosemary Armao and Rosemary Armao,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Let me start with the garnish to make a point about The New Steamboat Landing Restaurant in Galesville. Food is served at this exquisite West River eatery on flat, bone-white plates ringed with a showy confetti of grated red cabbage, carrots and celery.Down to the smallest details, the new owners of this long-established restaurant have thought through what makes for unique dining."You have to go in and look at the bathroom," says Letitia Policano Gordon, who took over Steamboat Landing last year with her sister, Camille Policano, and their father, Larry Policano.
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